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Adam Was Black

Adam Was Black

http://www.adamwasblack.org/

Related:  yhwh truth

Hebrew Lexicon The Old Testament Hebrew lexicon is Brown, Driver, Briggs, Gesenius Lexicon; this is keyed to the "Theological Word Book of the Old Testament." Also included are pronunciations of each word with alternate pronunciations if available. Bible Study Tools offers two Bible versions, King James and New American Standard, for studying within the Old Testament lexicons. Israelites Came to Ancient Japan Ark of the covenant of (left) and "Omikoshi" ark of (right) Dear friends in the world, I am a Japanese Christian writer living in . As I study the Bible, I began to realize that many traditional customs and ceremonies in are very similar to the ones of ancient . I considered that perhaps these rituals came from the religion and customs of the Jews and the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel who might have come to ancient . The following sections are concerned with those Japanese traditions which possibly originated from the ancient Israelites.

Current sea level rise Trends in global average absolute sea level, 1870–2008.[1] Changes in sea level since the end of the last glacial episode. Current sea level rise is about 3 mm/year worldwide. According to the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), "this is a significantly larger rate than the sea-level rise averaged over the last several thousand years", and the rate may be increasing.[2] This rise in sea levels around the world potentially affects human populations in coastal and island regions[3] and natural environments like marine ecosystems.[4] Between 1870 and 2004, global average sea levels rose 195 mm (7.7 in), 1.46 mm (0.057 in) per year.[5] From 1950 to 2009, measurements show an average annual rise in sea level of 1.7 ± 0.3 mm per year, with satellite data showing a rise of 3.3 ± 0.4 mm per year from 1993 to 2009,[6] a faster rate of increase than previously estimated.[7] It is unclear whether the increased rate reflects an increase in the underlying long-term trend.[8]

70 metal books found in Jordan cave could change our view of Biblical history By Fiona Macrae Updated: 19:36 GMT, 30 March 2011 For scholars of faith and history, it is a treasure trove too precious for price. This ancient collection of 70 tiny books, their lead pages bound with wire, could unlock some of the secrets of the earliest days of Christianity. Academics are divided as to their authenticity but say that if verified, they could prove as pivotal as the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1947. Lines of inquiry: The metal tablets could change our understanding of the Bible On pages not much bigger than a credit card, are images, symbols and words that appear to refer to the Messiah and, possibly even, to the Crucifixion and Resurrection.

Hebrew Alphabet The Hebrew and Yiddish languages use a different alphabet than English. The picture below illustrates the Hebrew alphabet, in Hebrew alphabetical order. Note that Hebrew is written from right to left, rather than left to right as in English, so Alef is the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet and Tav is the last. The Hebrew alphabet is often called the "alefbet," because of its first two letters. Letters of the Alefbet Aboriginal Hebrews Black Hebrews? The very words cause many people to grin at what appears to be simply a play on words. No one reads about such people in european authored history books and there are only a few references to "Ethiopian Jews" in white Jewish sources. Yet Black Hebrews have existed since biblical times. Black History Month Exhibition! Africans in India: From Slaves to Generals and Rulers Generals, commanders, admirals, prime ministers, and rulers, East Africans greatly distinguished themselves in India. They wrote a story unparalleled in the rest of the world — that of enslaved Africans attaining the pinnacle of military and political authority not only in a foreign country but also on another continent. Come discover their extraordinary story in a groundbreaking exhibition at the Schomburg Center — on view from February 1 to July 6 — and on March 21, join Dr.

Jewish Values This fascinating series will discuss the commandments in the Torah that focus on our relationships with other people. Discussing both the laws and philosophy of these commandments, we will discover how the Torah's teachings can still be highly relevant to the world we live in today. We will discuss how they can enable us to lead happier and more tranquil lives by improving our relationships with the people around us.

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