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Science Shows Something Surprising About People Who Love to Write

Science Shows Something Surprising About People Who Love to Write
DAVOS, Switzerland — In an exclusive interview on Friday, British Prime Minister David Cameron told Mic that defeating is "the battle of our generation." "For many in your audience, I think this is something people really need to understand, the scale of the threat that we face," Cameron said. "It's the battle of our time." In a wide-ranging foreign policy conversation with Mic at the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum, Cameron sketched out his vision on a series of issues, including the fight against global terrorism, the war in Syria and the refugee crisis. Cameron said that he and President Barack Obama are working "very closely together" and are "one and the same" in their approach to defeating the Islamic State, also known as ISIL, ISIS or Daesh. "They are making a fundamental mistake of trying to blame all of Islam and all Muslims for what is the ideology and the actions of a minority." Read the transcript of our conversation below, condensed and for clarity:

http://mic.com/articles/98348/science-shows-writers-have-a-serious-advantage-over-the-rest-of-us#.zLBTna7yV

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The Alarming New Research on Perfectionism Perfectionism is a trait many of us cop to coyly, maybe even a little proudly. (“I’m a perfectionist” being the classic response you say in a job interview when asked to name your biggest flaw — one that you think isn’t really a flaw — for example.) But real perfectionism can be devastatingly destructive, leading to crippling anxiety or depression, and it may even be an overlooked risk factor for suicide, argues a new paper in Review of General Psychology, a journal of the American Psychological Association. The most agreed-upon definition of perfectionist is simply the need to be perfect, or to at least appear that way.

20 Mystical Bridges That Will Take You To Another World Bridges lead Queens to their castles, Brooklyn to New York, and commuters on their everyday route to work. Without bridges our world would be a different place, although we rarely stop to think about a world without bridges. Back many years ago, the South American Inca civilization were among the first we know of to use bridges as a mode of transportation. Their rope bridges paved the way for many more bridges to develop in societies all over the world, and all throughout time. Some bridges are big and beautiful, while other bridges play it simple and humble. These 20 bridges are incredibly mystical, for more reasons than one.

30 Magical Photos Of Children Playing Around The World No matter their cultural background, no matter their economic situation, kids will always find imaginative ways to have fun. Their wild imaginations and magical childhood moments, when captured on camera by talented photographers, can make for truly wonderful photos. These 33 images we collected will prove that childhood can be wonderful no matter where you go. Show Full Text 20 words that once meant something very different Words change meaning over time in ways that might surprise you. We sometimes notice words changing meaning under our noses (e.g., unique coming to mean “very unusual” rather than “one of a kind”) — and it can be disconcerting. How in the world are we all going to communicate effectively if we allow words to shift in meaning like that?

Robin Williams, depression and the complex causes of suicide As the tributes to the actor and comedian Robin Williams continue, so too do the arguments over the meaning of his death. Suicide is a profound act that touches many, and it would be surprising if it didn’t raise strong feelings. On the one hand we have Shep Smith of Fox News calling Williams a “coward” (he has since apologised). How To Improve Your Writing: 5 Secrets From Hollywood Thanks to the internet, people are reading and writing more than ever. But is it me, or does it seem like the quality of that writing has gotten worse? However, this can be a good thing. These days, solid writing really stands out.

No one could see the colour blue until modern times This isn’t another story about that dress, or at least, not really. It’s about the way that humans see the world, and how until we have a way to describe something, even something so fundamental as a colour, we may not even notice that it’s there. Until relatively recently in human history, “blue” didn’t exist. As the delightful Radiolab episode “Colours” describes, ancient languages didn’t have a word for blue — not Greek, not Chinese, not Japanese, not Hebrew. And without a word for the colour, there’s evidence that they may not have seen it at all. 4 Ways to Deal with Your Emotional Black Hole. The Emotional Black Hole – also known as hitting the self destruct button, self sabotaging goals, aspirations and dreams and existing in a negatively charged emotional state that makes life nearly unbearable for yourself and everyone around you. Are any of these familiar? They are to me: I don’t feel like it. I hate the way I look.

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