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Home - The Journal of Teaching English With Technology (TEwT)

Home - The Journal of Teaching English With Technology (TEwT)
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Australasian Journal of Educational Technology Announcement: AJET moves to early release When articles have been accepted for publication and have been copyedited and typeset they will be made available online. Early release allows us to disseminate research into the public domain more rapidly, and thereby more effectively serve our authors and readers. More details can be found in the Editorial for Volume 31, Issue 1. Call for Proposals for a Special Issue of AJET in 2016 The editors of the Australasian Journal of Educational Technology (AJET) welcome expressions of interest from individuals or teams interested in guest editing a special issue of the journal in 2016. Expressions of interest of up to 500 words should include the following information: - Names and affiliations of guest editor(s), including experience and brief biographical details - Proposed special edition theme, including possible topics - The relevance of the theme to the scope and coverage of the journal Table of Contents Editorial Articles

English Language Teaching English Language Teaching (ELT) is a double-blind peer-reviewed international journal dedicated to promoting scholarly exchange among teachers and researchers in the field of English Language Teaching. The journal is published monthly in both print and online versions by the Canadian Center of Science and Education. The scope of ELT includes the following fields: theory and practice in English language teaching and learning, teaching English as a second or foreign language, English language teachers’ training and education. Authors are encouraged to submit complete, unpublished, original, and full-length articles that are not under review in any other journals. Statistics 2014 Q2: Articles Received: 110; Accepted: 61; Rejected: 49; Published: 48; Retracted: 2 2014 Q1: Articles Received: 122; Accepted: 56; Rejected: 74; Published: 47; Retracted: 0 2013: Articles Received: 415; Accepted: 250; Rejected: 166; Published: 201; Retracted: 2 Issues What is e-Version FirstTM Announcements

#AusELT | Connecting ELT professionals in Australia and beyond ACAL Australian Council for Adult Literacy - supporting literacy and numeracy education for adults Courses in Sydney - Centre for Continuing Education - The University of Sydney Teacher Collaboration: When Belief Systems Collide It's impossible to explore how we can work more effectively together in schools without considering conflict -- an inevitable part of working together. Conflict can be challenging and destructive, or it can lead to a deeper understanding between people, and perhaps higher quality work from a team. There are many reasons why conflict can exist within a school or a team of educators. In December, I attended a fantastic workshop at the annual Learning Forward conference on breaking through conflict. It was led by Robert Garmston (co-author of Unlocking Group Potential to Improve Schools) and Jennifer Abrams (author of Having Hard Conversations). In this workshop, the presenters offered one way of identifying where conflict originates -- in the belief systems that we each hold about the role and purpose of education. 6 Belief Systems In his book, Cognitive Coaching, Robert Garmston (with co-author Arthur Costa) identifies six predominant ideologies that influence educators' decision-making:

Who Teaches The Teachers? by Simon Oxenham That’s a question now being raised after a major report from the National Council on Teacher Quality found most teacher training textbooks and courses aren’t based in evidence and contain large amounts of myths and misinformation. One researcher is now posing the question – if not textbooks – where do teachers, can teachers, and should teachers get reliable information? The numbers above are clearly heavily skewed at the tech savvy end of the spectrum due to being based on a small opportunity sample obtained from Twitter – obviously this isn’t a scientific study. But it’s not the numbers that I find interesting, it’s the question itself. The idea that cognitive journals are the most objective form of research is clearly highly debatable, and likely influenced by the fact that the infographic was created by a cognitive researcher. Traditionally textbooks are widely treated as the pinnacle of evidence and lowly blogs, well... less so.

5 Good Teaching Habits | ELT Blog As teachers and learners, we all expect different things from learning and teaching. Some learners expect language-heavy courses, full of grammar and with lots of teacher explanation. Others anticipate a more social learning approach, where they play with the language and acquire it through practice, practice and practice. Whatever the style you take or whatever the style your learners expect you to take, there are some basic behaviours that all teachers should follow in the classroom. These go a long way to building an effective learning environment. Whether you have been in teaching for five minutes or five years, reminding yourself of the core basics of good teaching is always a good refresher. So, what are these top five teaching behaviours or habits? (1) Make it count Adults, businessmen, Young Learners – all types of learners will take every word you say in the classroom seriously. This is something which is unlikely to change, so you need to be prepared for this. (2) Listen to them

Lesson Plan: Selfie Safari – ELT Ideas Level: All levelsSkills: Speaking, Vocabulary, PresentationsObjectives: build relationships with classmates, practice polite language for talking with strangers, develop vocabulary related to the target items, become confident navigating the city, practice giving an informal presentationNumber of students: 4 + Going on a selfie safari (flickr.com/photos/time-to-look/) This is a simple, fun activity where students are given a list of places or items that they have to find and photograph in the city where they’re studying. Download the teachers’ guide below for more details.

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