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WHAT IS YOUR WORLDVIEW?

WHAT IS YOUR WORLDVIEW?
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Understanding Evolution The bacteria that changed the world - May, 2017 The make-up of Earth's atmosphere, once the domain of Earth science textbooks, has become an increasingly "hot" news topic in recent decades, as we struggle to curb global warming by limiting the carbon dioxide that human activity produces. While the changes that humanity has wrought on the planet are dramatic, this isn’t the first time that one species has changed Earth’s atmosphere. Three billion years ago, there was no free oxygen in the atmosphere at all. Life was anaerobic, meaning that it did not need oxygen to live and grow. That all changed due to the evolution of Cyanobacteria, a group of single-celled, blue-green bacteria. Read the rest of the story here | See the Evo in the News archive

2_Darwin%20tree-11130.html from suntimes.com When I began as a film critic, Jean-Luc Godard was widely thought to have reinvented the cinema with "Breathless" (1960). Now he is almost 80 and has made what is said to be his last film, and he's still at the job, reinventing. If only he had stopped while he was ahead. That would have been sometime in the 1970s. Maybe the 1980s. For sure, the 1990s. The thousands of seats in the Auditorium Debussy were jammed, and many were turned away. Continue reading → An article reflecting on 25 years at the movies by Roger Ebert. Continue reading → I know it is coming, and I do not fear it, because I believe there is nothing on the other side of death to fear. Continue reading → An essay about Rod Blagojevich by Roger Ebert. Continue reading → Roger Ebert's essay on film in the 1978 edition of the Britannica publication, "The Great Ideas Today." Continue reading → Thank you. Continue reading → Continue reading → Continue reading → Continue reading → Continue reading →

Twelve Virtues of Rationality by Eliezer Yudkowsky by Eliezer Yudkowsky The first virtue is curiosity. A burning itch to know is higher than a solemn vow to pursue truth. To feel the burning itch of curiosity requires both that you be ignorant, and that you desire to relinquish your ignorance. If in your heart you believe you already know, or if in your heart you do not wish to know, then your questioning will be purposeless and your skills without direction. Curiosity seeks to annihilate itself; there is no curiosity that does not want an answer. The second virtue is relinquishment. The third virtue is lightness. The fourth virtue is evenness. The fifth virtue is argument. The sixth virtue is empiricism. The seventh virtue is simplicity. The eighth virtue is humility. The ninth virtue is perfectionism. The tenth virtue is precision. The eleventh virtue is scholarship. Before these eleven virtues is a virtue which is nameless. Miyamoto Musashi wrote, in The Book of Five Rings: How can you improve your conception of rationality?

What they used to look like. Living the wild life... Call of Duty Karachi Sherlock? Leaving messages for the future. This dog's life is beyond better than mine. If countries were classmates. Teach the Controversy - Intelligently designed t-shirts urging you to show both sides of every story - by Jeremy Kalgreen The Origin and Evolution of Cells - The Cell - NCBI Bookshelf Ikea Science Fiction by Susana Polo | 11:53 am, May 9th, 2011 I could make some joke here about how Ikea directions always make me feel like I’m expected to build something that’s bigger on the inside, but I actually have never had that much trouble following Ikea directions THERE I SAID IT. Seriously, if you’ve ever put together some Lego sets, you already have all the experience you need. No, the problem I always seem to have is with the furniture where you have to pick up extra parts that aren’t expressly mentioned all over the boxes of the parts you already have, and I find that I’ve left a vital element of a bed, like the bits that hold up the mattress, at the warehouse. (via College Humor.)

6 Questions That Will Make You Fee Peaceful and Complete “The best place to find a helping hand is at the end of your own arm.” ~Swedish Proverb When I was in my mid-twenties an unhealthy relationship with an unhealthy guy sent me packing off to the corner of New Mexico to find myself. I became a workshop junkie. I got rolfed, (and got more intense body-work by thick-boned Maoris) and rebirthed with conscious breath work. I went on vision quests in the desert, called leading psychics, mapped my astrological chart, figured out my Enneagram number, dreamed lucidly for nights in an upright chair, and drew down the moon in Wiccan circles. I had psychic surgeries, soft-tissue chiropractic work, drank herbal tinctures and elixirs, bought every kind of healing essential oil, collected a library of self-help books, and did inner-child work, gestalt dialogues, and did loads of homework with several life coaches. I know. I was a perpetual seeker. Whether he meant it or not, he would say: What’s not to love about you? 1. 2. 3. As humans we make mistakes.

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