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Dr Vino's wine blog » wine talk that goes down easy Dr Vino's wine blog

Dr Vino's wine blog » wine talk that goes down easy Dr Vino's wine blog
Eataly Wine will close for six months and its owners, including celebrity chef Mario Batali, will also pay a $500,000 fine per an agreement with New York state authorities yesterday. No date has been set for the start of the closing. The settlement resulted from the State Liquor Authority’s enforcement of a ban on “interlocking interests.” The SLA also claimed that the shop’s owners suppressed that information. The turn of events is somewhat puzzling. It was no secret that Joe Bastianich sold wines that he made at his winery in the north of Italy.

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Appellation Beer: Celebrating Beer From a Place A quick exchange of comments here Monday provoked this thought from Boak & Bailey about what happens to even the most dominant of breweries over time: Our suspicion is that, of the current wave of new brewers (1970s to now) some will inevitably become the new Whitbreads and Watneys.We don’t see, say, Sierra Nevada going into the Lite Lager business any time soon, but we can imagine, in thirty years time, a business which seems complacent and arrogant, and of which people will say: “They’re so dominant that no-one else can get into the market, and all they produce is that bland, dumbed-down, sub-6% pale ale crap …”If that does happen, there will be plenty of brewers waiting to challenge them, and the cycle will continue. Of course change is inevitable, but is complacency?

Vegan Food Skip to Main Content PETA People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals Animals are not oursto eat, wear, experiment on, use for entertainment, or abuse in any other way. Vegan Food White Castle’s Veggie Sliders Are Now Vegan The times they are a-changin’, as burger chains such as White Castle offer vegan options. Pasty A pasty (/ˈpæsti/, Cornish: Hogen; Pasti), (sometimes known in the United States as a pastie or British pasty)[1] is a baked pastry, a traditional variety of which is particularly associated with Cornwall, the westernmost county in England. It is made by placing uncooked filling typically of meat and vegetables, without meat in vegetarian versions, on a flat pastry circle and folding it to wrap the filling, crimping the edge to form a seal. After baking, the result is a raised semicircular food item. The traditional Cornish pasty, which has Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) status in Europe,[2] is filled with beef, sliced or diced potato, swede (also known as a yellow turnip or rutabaga – referred to in Cornwall as turnip) and onion, seasoned with salt and pepper, and is baked. Today, the pasty is the food most associated with Cornwall, it is regarded as the national dish, and it accounts for 6% of the Cornish food economy.

Planet Of The Grapes Beware: Using your favorite wine in cocktails is a surefire way to scandalize the “serious” wine snobs in your life. Which, of course, is always fun. Mix up your wine routine with more than 40 new recipes from top mixologists in Planet of the Grapes Volume 3: Wine Cocktails, available now on Amazon. Home Brewing Blog by BeerSmith - Making Beer at Home This week we discuss how to keg your home brewed beer with Chris Graham from MoreBeer. I highly recommend watching the video as this week Chris provides a detailed overview on kegging equipment, kegging techniques and how to make the transition from bottles to kegs! Download the MP3 File – Right Click and Save As […]

sans titre iTunes version 4.9 or greater, click here. If you use another podcast reader, click here for our RSS feed. 4/25/2013: Anistatia Miller and Jared Brown: Mark and Francis welcome Anistatia Miller and Jared Brown to the show to discuss their new book, The Deans of Drink, historic cocktails, cocktail museums, and how Europe is different from the US, not ....>> More 3/6/2013: Susan McKenna Grant: Mark and Francis open the show with another discussion about photography in restaurants. Their guest is Susan McKenna Grant, owner of La Petraia, in Rada, Chianti and author of the new book, Dinamica....>> More Ale Ale is a type of beer brewed from malted barley using a warm fermentation with a strain of brewers' yeast.[1][2] The yeast will ferment the beer quickly, giving it a sweet, full bodied and fruity taste. Most ales contain hops, which help preserve the beer and impart a bitter herbal flavour that balances the sweetness of the malt. Another way to define ale is as "top-fermented"; that is, the yeast, rather than sinking to the bottom as in a lager, floats on the surface of the liquid during fermentation.

The Feiring Line Impressed by the handling of the Olivier Cousin case, I stopped in to talk lawyer Eric Morain when last in Paris. With a case of Frank Cornelissen 2009s resting against the wall, the avocat sat behind his desk in his art-filled office. His handsome-cherubic face is angled in by a gently silvering beard. Mail constantly beeped into his computer. With the help of my friend, Alon Rozen who is acting dean of the ENPC MBA, Paris, we started to talk about life, natural, Voltaire, French and wine. Fraud was the primary issue in the case.

African cuisine African cuisine is a generalized term collectively referring to the cuisines of Africa. The continent of Africa is the second largest landmass on Earth, and is home to hundreds of different cultural and ethnic groups. This diversity is also reflected in the many local culinary traditions in terms of choice of ingredients, style of preparation and cooking techniques. Traditionally, the various cuisines of Africa use a combination of locally available fruits, cereal grains and vegetables, as well as milk and meat products. In some parts of the continent, the traditional diet features a preponderance of milk, curd and whey products. In much of Tropical Africa, however, cow's milk is rare and cannot be produced locally (owing to various diseases that affect livestock).

Tablas Creek Vineyard Blog By Robert Haas Congratulations to Jean-Pierre and François Perrin, "Men of the Year" in the current issue of the venerable English wine magazine Decanter. I cannot think of any French wine family with better credentials. We love them.

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