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THIS NEW GREEN HOUSE"

THIS NEW GREEN HOUSE"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpAJix897jg

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Down to Earth Design - online articles on natural building & sustainable design Straw has been used in various ways as a construction material for as long as there has been agriculture. Early structures implement straw-clay combinations. The straw provided tensile strength and some insulation value, and gave clay building materials additional structural integrity. Sustainable Design - Buildipedia.com™ Upgrade your home’s insulation and air-seal gaps and cracks sooner rather than later. This is one home improvement that will pay for itself relatively quickly and then continue to generate savings for as long as you live in your home. Even if a full upgrade is not in your budget this year, you can tackle several low- or no-cost improvements right now. Here are 10 tips to keep your home comfortable this winter. 1.

Grain Bin Cabin Plan Grain Bin Cabin Mark Clipsham, Architect This 1 bedroom, 2 bathroom 692 sf cabin will keep you warm in winter and cool in summer. It also has the potential to provide as many as 12 "berths" for use as a hunting cabin or such. Each berth could have its indiviual heat or A/C duct for greater efficiency. The basis of the design components is to put a grain bin inside a grain bin and insulate the space between them with foam. This makes the structure self-supporting, self-framing (no studs in the outside walls), thermally and acoustically broken (super-high performance), and maintenance free for fifty plus years. Strawbale vs. Cob...Not the Typical "King Kong vs. Godzilla" Story King Kong and Godzilla fought to the death. One victor. One “good guy”. They didn’t walk off into the sunset hand-in-hand at the end of the battle. Not so for strawbale and cob.

The Seemingly Simple GO Home is a LEED Platinum House That Packs a Green Energy Punch Photo credit: Trent Bell The bright red GO Home in Belfast, Maine was recently selected as the LEED for Homes Project of the Year for 2011. Completed by GO Logic, the seemingly simple house packs an impressive renewable energy punch and is a LEED Platinum and Passive House certified residence. Because it is a passive house, the home’s owners will see a 90% reduction in their heating bill, resulting in a cool $300 dollars per year for space heating, while enjoying all the comforts of the super insulated building shell during the winter months. With a roof clad in solar panels, The GO Home is also net zero, creating all the energy on site that it needs to provide heat, hot water and electricity for the home owners who will not see an energy bill for the next 25 years. + GO Logic Homes

Santa Fe IV Plan Santa Fe IV Sven Alstrom, Designer South Elevation This one story Santa Fe Style Guest House is based upon 24-inch wide straw bale construction or adobe block on concrete foundation & footings with crawl spaces. Yes you can! Build with strawbales in wet climates... small habits that make a big difference... Cut down on cleaning products...make your own fast & effective cleaners in your kitchen! Ok, I'll admit it...when I someone first suggested this to me, I thought "that's nuts!" I figure there was no way home-made products would work well. Otherwise no one would buy cleaning products!

Permaculture Ethics and Design Principles Poster Permaculture Flower Poster See how permaculture can be applied with this free poster for you to print out. The Permacuture Flower poster is a great teaching tool to present to students, or as a reference. The flower illustrates how the permaculture journey, begining with the ethics and design principles, moves through the key domains required to create a sustainable culture. Solar Oval Cob Plan Small Cob Series No permit required - passive solar - small cob buildings SOLAR OVAL ONE is a compact passive solar design with a loft which can be an outbuilding for many possible uses. It has many valuable and green/sustainable features: Building with cob allows the use of local sustainable materials.

Green, cheap and efficient straw bale dome homes :) - Energetic Forum Hi easyrider. The dome structure is very solid, it now supports around 3-4 tons of weight with all the clay and straw bales. The work is rather hard and weather dependent, if it is raining, you need to cover the dome with something to prevent water damage, if it is sunny, you need to remove the rain protecting plastic or whatever so that clay can dry better. You need to do all the inside and outside clay works before you can proceed to waterproofing the inner and outer surface.

Bees and Permaculture Article and Film- Brigit Strawbridge We are very proud to have a guest post this week by Brigit Strawbridge on Bees and Permaculture…. First up we have a film of a great talk that Brigit did about bees at the Sunrise Off Grid festival in 2011, followed by a article by Brigit on Bees and Permaculture, a great resource for all bee lovers out there. A quick note, Brigit contacted me to say that at the start of the film she says, there are 200,000 types of bees, but actually it’s 20,000, but it would be great if there was 200,000 Bees and permaculture:

Roundhouse Studio Plan Perfect for home offices and studios of all kinds, and also as a tiny house. Ideal beginner's project. This studio is one of the simplest, most practical of my designs. Multiple units can be connected if you want to add on later or they can be built as free standing structures in clusters pavilion style. Numerous roof options available. 177 sq. ft. interior, fold-out bed, 1 bath: footprint: 18' diameter, plus buttress. How new straw-bale homes could help solve the housing crisis -Low impact living info, training, products & services In an ordinary street in Bristol, UK, something extraordinary is happening. All of the seven houses are made with straw. Built from carbon-capturing, renewable materials of timber and straw, the homes bank more carbon than is emitted in making them.

This Amazing Invention Is Saving Countless Lives After Typhoon Haiyan When natural disaster strikes, one of the first and most significant casualties is clean water: Humans can only go so long without liquids; as days pass without functioning infrastructure, bacteria spread and multiply, as does the threat of disease. Large aid organizations’ answer has often been to send 747s stocked with cases of bottled water to the affected areas. But drop-offs like that can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and leave behind a stream of plastic waste. Enter WaterStep, a Kentucky-based aid organization that says it’s come up with a clever solution: the M-100 Chlorine Generator, a football-size water filter that allows survivors to produce up to 10,000 gallons of potable water per day. Sixty of the devices are being used in the Philippines, says WaterStep CEO Mark Hogg. The generator’s byproducts—chlorine and sodium hydroxide—are valuable resources for locals, says Hogg.

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