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THIS NEW GREEN HOUSE"

THIS NEW GREEN HOUSE"
Related:  Eco-Design, -livingAbout

Grain Bin Cabin Plan Grain Bin Cabin Mark Clipsham, Architect This 1 bedroom, 2 bathroom 692 sf cabin will keep you warm in winter and cool in summer. It also has the potential to provide as many as 12 "berths" for use as a hunting cabin or such. Each berth could have its indiviual heat or A/C duct for greater efficiency. The basis of the design components is to put a grain bin inside a grain bin and insulate the space between them with foam. Don't want to use foam insulation or too far from an installer? Floor Plans Mark is offering 4 hours of consulting time with the basic cost of this plan, and this can be done before you receive the plans so that it is possible to have some custom alterations made. All designs depicted are the exclusive property of Architecture By Synthesis and are copyright protected. These plans include all plans, sections, elevations, details, etc. that are appropriate for this plan package.

Go Green || Sustainable Design - Buildipedia.com™ Upgrade your home’s insulation and air-seal gaps and cracks sooner rather than later. This is one home improvement that will pay for itself relatively quickly and then continue to generate savings for as long as you live in your home. Even if a full upgrade is not in your budget this year, you can tackle several low- or no-cost improvements right now. 1. If you have a sunroom or enclosed porch with a southern exposure, it can collect a great deal of heat. 2. In winter, a surprising amount of cold air can leak into your house around window and door openings, due largely to the fact that the framed (or rough) opening of a window or door is bigger than actual size of the window or door. 3. Baseboard and crown moldings that run along exterior walls are also sources of cold air infiltration. 4. Vent fans, recessed lights, and electric receptacles and switches on exterior walls can be significant sources of uncomfortable drafts and energy loss. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Down to Earth Design - online articles on natural building & sustainable design Straw has been used in various ways as a construction material for as long as there has been agriculture. Early structures implement straw-clay combinations. The straw provided tensile strength and some insulation value, and gave clay building materials additional structural integrity. Europeans used straw lightly coated with clay slip to infill heavy timber construction. Many examples of both of these techniques survive today. Straw is the stalk of any grain plant (oat, wheat, rice, barley, etc.). There are 2 basic types of strawbale construction: loadbearing (or Nebraska style) and non-loadbearing (or infill). Strawbale infill construction does not rely on bales to carry any of the building loads (other than the weight of the bales themselves).

Santa Fe IV Plan Santa Fe IV Sven Alstrom, Designer South Elevation This one story Santa Fe Style Guest House is based upon 24-inch wide straw bale construction or adobe block on concrete foundation & footings with crawl spaces. Natural interior plaster and natural exterior stucco are recommended. The house is 1,650 square feet gross (outside dimension) plus the courtyard & porch. Section Floor Plan The open kitchen may seat eight and is shown with a work table next to the entry. Here is a quote from one of Sven's many satisfied customers: "Sven worked within the design times that he initially gave us, worked well with other design people, helped us negotiate a contract with the general contractor, and was very active in recommendations for purchased items and appliances. Copyright Ecological Architecture P.C. for this design.

The Seemingly Simple GO Home is a LEED Platinum House That Packs a Green Energy Punch Photo credit: Trent Bell The bright red GO Home in Belfast, Maine was recently selected as the LEED for Homes Project of the Year for 2011. Completed by GO Logic, the seemingly simple house packs an impressive renewable energy punch and is a LEED Platinum and Passive House certified residence. Because it is a passive house, the home’s owners will see a 90% reduction in their heating bill, resulting in a cool $300 dollars per year for space heating, while enjoying all the comforts of the super insulated building shell during the winter months. + GO Logic Homes

Strawbale vs. Cob...Not the Typical "King Kong vs. Godzilla" Story King Kong and Godzilla fought to the death. One victor. One “good guy”. Not so for strawbale and cob. STRAWBALES insulate. STRAWBALES work best... ...as exterior walls anywhere you are trying to keep the inside temperature different from the exterior temperature. I RECOMMEND: Build exterior walls with STRAWBALES if you live in a climate where a well-insulated home is more comfortable and cheaper to heat/cool. COB provides thermal mass. COB works best... ...as thermal mass built around a masonry heater or rocket stove (or near a wood burning stove), where the cob can absorb heat from the fire, and store the heat energy even after the fire is out. ...for trombe walls in passive solar design, with the cob thermal mass inside, where it is warmed by sun coming through South-facing glass. ...for any interior element when you are trying to keep the inside cool.

Solar Oval Cob Plan Small Cob Series No permit required - passive solar - small cob buildings SOLAR OVAL ONE is a compact passive solar design with a loft which can be an outbuilding for many possible uses. It has many valuable and green/sustainable features: Building with cob allows the use of local sustainable materials. In many areas the earth at your site can be used and only water, sand and straw will need to be brought to your site to make your cob. The cob is mixed right where you are building and stacked up on an impervious foundation. Floor Plan THE SMALL COB SERIES is a set of small cob structures designed to not require building permits. Solar Oval One is a 120 interior sf. cob design intended to not require a building permit. Section looking North The introduction of irregular, non rectilinear and curved walls into your building creates a link between you, your building and the natural world. The materials needed to make a cob structure are generally very simple and there are many options:

Permaculture Principles | Resources | Free Downloads | Permaculture Ethics and Design Principles Poster Permaculture Flower Poster See how permaculture can be applied with this free poster for you to print out. The Permacuture Flower poster is a great teaching tool to present to students, or as a reference. The flower illustrates how the permaculture journey, begining with the ethics and design principles, moves through the key domains required to create a sustainable culture. Examples of specific fields, design systems and solutions are listed to help understand the concept. Suggested size A3 and above, but can be printed at any size without loss of quality. Usage: This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works. Available as a PDF in ENGLISH, DUTCH, SPANISH, PORTUGUESE, HEBREW, FRENCH and HUNGARIAN Permaculture Principle Song Lyrics & Chords Learn the 12 principle songs from the album Permaculture: A Rhymer’s Manual

Yes you can! Build with strawbales in wet climates... small habits that make a big difference... Cut down on cleaning products...make your own fast & effective cleaners in your kitchen! Ok, I'll admit it...when I someone first suggested this to me, I thought "that's nuts!" Do it because it's cheaper Well...needless to say, I tried it anyway. Do it for your health But the biggest reason to ditch the cleaners is health! Admittedly I don't make all of my cleaning products, but my supply of what I buy is pretty limited...down to dish liquid, laundry soap, and Murphy's oil soap. Below is my favorite book with recipes for every application you can think of. If you buy one book on homemade cleaners, this is the one I would get: If you are looking for additional information on the health and safety of various household products, I love the Health & Human Services database at:

Roundhouse Studio Plan Perfect for home offices and studios of all kinds, and also as a tiny house. Ideal beginner's project. This studio is one of the simplest, most practical of my designs. My main goal has been to reduce the cost of housing, while also making the designs sustainable, easy to build and livable. Cost: How much do earthbag houses cost? A typical 300-800 sq.ft. house made of natural building materials could be built by a DIY builder for about $3,000-$10,000 (about $10/sq.ft.) and have the following features: - gravel-filled bags on a rubble trench foundation (with insulating fill material such as perlite or scoria in cold climates) - earthbag walls filled with soil or insulation, such as perlite, volcanic rock or rice hulls - earth-berming for improved energy performance - earth, stone or recycled brick floors - earth or lime plaster - affordable roof options such as domes, spiral (reciprocal) roofs, green roofs, poles, pallet trusses, metal roofing for collecting rainwater, thatch, etc

Bees and Permaculture Article and Film- Brigit Strawbridge We are very proud to have a guest post this week by Brigit Strawbridge on Bees and Permaculture…. First up we have a film of a great talk that Brigit did about bees at the Sunrise Off Grid festival in 2011, followed by a article by Brigit on Bees and Permaculture, a great resource for all bee lovers out there. A quick note, Brigit contacted me to say that at the start of the film she says, there are 200,000 types of bees, but actually it’s 20,000, but it would be great if there was 200,000 Bees and permaculture: I have to admit to being just a little obsessed with bees. They have fascinated and enchanted me since my childhood, but it is only since the decline of the honeybee began to make headlines a few years ago that I fully realised the magnitude of their importance as pollinators – and how much I had always taken them for granted. Pollinators: Brief overview of the bee population: Bees within a permaculture design: Keeping honeybees: Biobees –

Green, cheap and efficient straw bale dome homes :) - Energetic Forum Hi easyrider. The dome structure is very solid, it now supports around 3-4 tons of weight with all the clay and straw bales. The work is rather hard and weather dependent, if it is raining, you need to cover the dome with something to prevent water damage, if it is sunny, you need to remove the rain protecting plastic or whatever so that clay can dry better. You need to do all the inside and outside clay works before you can proceed to waterproofing the inner and outer surface. There is also always a possibility of strawbales beginning to rot and other difficulties, that is why you would need to build everything as fast as you can so that straw bales have no chance to get wet. A little wetness is nothing bad, it dries fast, but prolonged wetness can cause problems. This is a 3/8 V3 dome 1m in diameter. If you have more questions, just ask! __________________ It's better to wear off by working than to rust by doing nothing.

Eco Nest 1200 Plan This 1434 sf home was designed specifically for an off grid building site. It's floorplan allows all spaces to be easily heated by the solar gain or by the woodstove at night. The main bedroom has its own bathroom and there is a cozy sleeping loft above the dining area for guests. The screened porch expands the living area to encompass the outdoors and the storage room will hold the bikes and garden tools. A 'living roof' completes the greening of this unique eco-nest! Floor Plan All of Integral Design Studio's strawbale plans incorporate an internal modified post and beam structure, with bales on edge as infill. These plans include all four elevations, scaled floorplans, cross section details, other significant construction details. *In some cases the prints may be on 24"x36" sheets.

This Amazing Invention Is Saving Countless Lives After Typhoon Haiyan When natural disaster strikes, one of the first and most significant casualties is clean water: Humans can only go so long without liquids; as days pass without functioning infrastructure, bacteria spread and multiply, as does the threat of disease. Large aid organizations’ answer has often been to send 747s stocked with cases of bottled water to the affected areas. But drop-offs like that can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and leave behind a stream of plastic waste. Enter WaterStep, a Kentucky-based aid organization that says it’s come up with a clever solution: the M-100 Chlorine Generator, a football-size water filter that allows survivors to produce up to 10,000 gallons of potable water per day. Sixty of the devices are being used in the Philippines, says WaterStep CEO Mark Hogg. The generator’s byproducts—chlorine and sodium hydroxide—are valuable resources for locals, says Hogg.

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