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This is actually what America would look like without gerrymandering

This is actually what America would look like without gerrymandering
The GOP scored 33 more seats in the House this election even though Democrats earned a million more votes in House races. Professor Jeremy Mayer says gerrymandering distorts democracy. (The Fold/The Washington Post) The GOP scored 33 more seats in the House this election even though Democrats earned a million more votes in House races. Professor Jeremy Mayer says gerrymandering distorts democracy. The GOP scored 33 more seats in the House this election even though Democrats earned a million more votes in House races. In his State of the Union speech, President Obama called on lawmakers and the public to take a number of steps "to change the system to reflect our better selves" for "a better politics." In most states, state legislatures draw the district boundaries that determine how many delegates the state sends to the U.S. The process of re-drawing district lines to give an advantage to one party over another is called "gerrymandering". Big difference, isn't it? Wonkbook newsletter

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/01/13/this-is-actually-what-america-would-look-like-without-gerrymandering/

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