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Venus figurines

Venus figurines
"Venus figurines" is an umbrella term for a number of prehistoric statuettes of women portrayed with similar physical attributes from the Upper Palaeolithic, mostly found in Europe, but with finds as far east as Irkutsk Oblast, Siberia, extending their distribution to much of Eurasia, from the Pyrenees to Lake Baikal. Most of them date to the Gravettian period, but there are a number of early examples from the Aurignacian, including the Venus of Hohle Fels, discovered in 2008, carbon dated to at least 35,000 years ago, and late examples of the Magdalenian, such as the Venus of Monruz, aged about 11,000 years. These figurines were carved from soft stone (such as steatite, calcite or limestone), bone or ivory, or formed of clay and fired. The latter are among the oldest ceramics known. In total, over a hundred such figurines are known; virtually all of modest size, between 4 cm and 25 cm in height. They are some of the earliest works of prehistoric art. History of discovery[edit] Notes[edit] Related:  Mother-Earth DeitieslilipilyspiritGods of Earth and Nature

The Stone Carvings And Stony-Hearted Women According to legends ascetics lived in their forest hermitages (ashram) in couples (mithuna). So I can adduce web versions of the famous Indian epos Ramayana, the very touching story of female loyal love Savitri and Satyavan, the myth on the god of ascetics and his consort Sati & Shiva who lived in the Himalayas — the homeland of Yakshas, and finally the legend of Upagupta: The Buddhist Monk portraying a Mathura sculptor carving sculpture of a beautiful female ascetic. Besides, in Indian mythology in Indian mythology occurs a very common motif of the interruption of an ascetic feat (tapas) with a sexual intercourse by a beautiful women. Also it's significant that Buddhist esoteric tradition of tantra is known to combine ascetic and sexual practices. Later historical sources picture Ancient Indian ascetics as celibates, sex as vulgarly sensual, and gender relations as problematic. and never in the reality or in realistic art. They feel at ease having no real cloth on.

Hathor Hathor (/ˈhæθɔr/ or /ˈhæθər/;[2] Egyptian: ḥwt-ḥr and from Greek: Άθωρ, "mansion of Horus")[1] is an Ancient Egyptian goddess who personified the principles of joy, feminine love, and motherhood.[3] She was one of the most important and popular deities throughout the history of Ancient Egypt. Hathor was worshiped by Royalty and common people alike in whose tombs she is depicted as "Mistress of the West" welcoming the dead into the next life.[4] In other roles she was a goddess of music, dance, foreign lands and fertility who helped women in childbirth,[4] as well as the patron goddess of miners.[5] The cult of Hathor predates the historic period, and the roots of devotion to her are therefore difficult to trace, though it may be a development of predynastic cults which venerated fertility, and nature in general, represented by cows.[6] Hathor is commonly depicted as a cow goddess with horns in which is set a sun disk with Uraeus. Early depictions[edit] Temples[edit] Hesat[edit] Notes[edit]

Terra (mythology) The word tellus, telluris is also a Latin common noun for "land, territory; earth," as is terra, "earth, ground". In literary uses, particularly in poetry, it may be ambiguous as to whether the goddess, a personification, or the common noun is meant. This article preserves the usage of the ancient sources regarding Tellus or Terra. Dedicatory inscription to Terra Mater fulfilling a vow (votum), 1st century AD The two words terra and tellus are thought to derive from the formulaic phrase tersa tellus, meaning "dry land". The 4th-century AD Latin commentator Servius distinguishes between tellus and terra in usage. Varro identifies Terra Mater with Ceres: Ovid distinguishes between Tellus as the locus ("site, location") of growth, and Ceres as its causa ("cause, agent").[13] Mater, the Latin word for "mother," is often used as an honorific for goddesses, including Vesta, who was represented as a virgin. Detail from a sarcophagus depicting a Mother Earth figure (3rd century AD)

Slavic mythology Many generations of Slavic artists were inspired by their national folklore: Ilya Yefimovich Repin, Sadko in the Underwater Kingdom (1876) Slavic mythology is the mythological aspect of the polytheistic religion that was practised by the Slavs before Christianisation. The religion possesses many common traits with other religions descended from the Proto-Indo-European religion. Old Slavic religion evolved over more than a thousand years and some parts of it were from neolithic or possibly even mesolithic times. The Earth was worshipped as Mat Zemlya and there were no temples. Modern wooden statue of Perun, the god of thunder and lightning, Ruthenia Sources of information[edit] Unlike Greek, Indian or Egyptian mythology, there are no first-hand records for the study of Slavic mythology. Written sources[edit] Artistic representation of Saxo Grammaticus Though considered authentic by some Slavic neopagans, the Book of Veles appears to be a forgery from the first half of the twentieth century.

Appreciating the Female Form... Well, I thought I’d never get access to this blog again, but here I am! You guys have stayed with me for so long, I’d love to get to know some of you. Feel free to ask anything or submit! 3:26 am • 2 April 2014 • 1 note Anonymous asked: How do i upload a picture? Just go to the submit page and feel free to upload a picture. 8:46 pm • 4 January 2013 Anonymous asked: Hey can you add pictures of girls with more pubic hair and more realistic looking women. I’d love to, but the resources that I get these pictures from are extremely random and I’m limited to posting what I get from there. If anyone would like to submit themselves or anywhere I can get such images from, I will gladly do so.

Mut Nineteenth dynasty statue of Mut, part of a double statue, c. 1279-1213 BCE, Luxor Museum Mut, which meant mother in the ancient Egyptian language,[1] was an ancient Egyptian mother goddess with multiple aspects that changed over the thousands of years of the culture. Alternative spellings are Maut and Mout. She was considered a primal deity, associated with the waters from which everything was born through parthenogenesis. She also was depicted as a woman with the crowns of Egypt upon her head. Some of Mut's many titles included World-Mother, Eye of Ra, Queen of the Goddesses, Lady of Heaven, Mother of the Gods, and She Who Gives Birth, But Was Herself Not Born of Any. Changes of mythological position[edit] Much later new myths held that since Mut had no parents, but was created from nothing; consequently, she could not have children and so adopted one instead. Making up a complete triad of deities for the later pantheon of Thebes, it was said that Mut had adopted Menthu, god of war.

Rhea (mythology) Rhea (or Cybele), after a marble, 1888. Then she hid Zeus in a cave on Mount Ida in Crete. According to varying versions of the story: Rhea only appears in Greek art from the fourth century BC, when her iconography draws on that of Cybele; the two therefore, often are indistinguishable;[10] both can be shown on a throne flanked by lions, riding a lion, or on a chariot drawn by two lions. Most often Rhea's symbol is a pair of lions, the ones that pulled her celestial chariot and were seen often, rampant, one on either side of the gateways through the walls to many cities in the ancient world. In Homer, Rhea is the mother of the gods, although not a universal mother like Cybele, the Phrygian Great Mother, with whom she was later identified.

Vergin (United w/ Pachamama after Spanish Invasion) Roman Catholic veneration of Mary, the mother of Jesus, which has grown over time in importance, is manifested not only in prayer but also in the visual arts, poetry and music.[2][3][4][5] Popes have encouraged it, while also taking steps to reform some manifestations of it.[note 1] The Holy See has insisted on the importance of distinguishing "true from false devotion, and authentic doctrine from its deformations by excess or defect".[6] There are significantly more titles, feasts and venerative Marian practices among Roman Catholics than in other Christian traditions.[7] Marian Movements and Societies with millions of members have arisen from belief in events such as Akita, Fatima and Lourdes and other reasons.[12] From Christ to Mary in the Roman Catholic tradition[edit] Theological basis for the veneration of Mary[edit] Mysteries of Christ and Mary[edit] At the centre of this mystery, in the midst of this wonderment of faith, stands Mary. From veneration to theology[edit]

Pachamama Pachamama is a goddess revered by the indigenous people of the Andes. She is also known as the earth/time mother. [1] In Inca mythology, Mama Pacha or Pachamama is a fertility goddess who presides over planting and harvesting. She causes earthquakes and is typically in the form of a dragon. Etymology[edit] Pachamama is usually translated as Mother Earth, but a more literal translation would be "World Mother" (in Aymara and Quechua. Modern Day Rituals[edit] Pachamama and Inti are believed to be the most benevolent deities; they are worshiped in parts of the Andean mountain ranges, also known as Tawantinsuyu (the former Inca Empire) (stretching from present day Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile and northern Argentina being present day Peru the center of the empire with its capital city in Cuzco). Household Rituals[edit] The Sunday Parade[edit] A main attraction of the Pachamama festival is the Sunday parade. New Age Worship[edit] Political Usage[edit] See also[edit] Notes[edit] References[edit]

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