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Science Experiments You Can Do At Home or School

Science Experiments You Can Do At Home or School

Iterative Algorithmic Plastic Sculpture: Fimo Fractals - Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories One of our favorite shapes is the Sierpinski triangle. In one sense, a mere mathematical abstraction, on the other, a pattern that naturally emerges in real life from several different simple algorithms. On paper, one can play the Chaos Game to generate the shape (or cheat and just use the java applet). You can also generate a Sierpinski triangle in what is perhaps a more obvious way: by exploiting its fractal self-similarity. Beginning with a single triangle, replace that triangle with three half-size copies arranged so that their outer border form a new triangle of the same size as the original. Then, replace each of those three triangles with three triangles half that size, and so forth.

100 Incredible Lectures from the World's Top Scientists Posted on Thursday June 18, 2009 by Staff Writers By Sarah Russel Unless you’re enrolled at one of the best online colleges or are an elite member of the science and engineering inner circle, you’re probably left out of most of the exciting research explored by the world’s greatest scientists. But thanks to the Internet and the generosity of many universities and online colleges, you’ve now got access to the cutting edge theories and projects that are changing the world in this list below. If you’re looking for even more amazing lectures, check out our updated list for 2012 with more talks from great minds. Master the Power: How to Shock People with Your Fingertips « Fear Of Lightning The circuit schematic is represented in the (incredibly detailed) drawing below: The generator charges you up like a capacitor, then when you come in contact with a grounded object (person), the voltage is discharged through them. I found it was best to put the generator, battery and switch inside an old shoe, like so (the "stripped" wire is ground): Of course, to get it inside the shoe it's necessary to do a little drilling...

25 Amazing Electron Microscope Images All the common objects are kinda boring when you look at them, but the situation changes when an awesome Electron Microscope comes in the scene. I mean, take a look at the Salt and pepper image. Isn’t it cool? Is like you’re eating massive stones and pieces of wood. Lego printer This is the home of the "lego felt tip 110". A fully working lego printer with driver for Mac OSX. Many people have asked for documentation, source code, instructions etc, so here it is. If you're wanting to make your own lego printer be aware that most of what I have done could be much more easily achieved with a lego mindstorms kit.

Mystery Human Fossils Unearthed in China An international team of researchers has discovered fossils of a previously unknown Stone Age people in southwest China. An artist's reconstruction of fossils from two caves in southwest China (Peter Schouten) The fossils are of a people with a highly unusual mix of archaic and modern anatomical features and are the youngest of their kind ever found in mainland East Asia. The discovery is published in the journal PLoS-ONE. “Dated to just 14,500 to 11,500 years old, these people would have shared the landscape with modern-looking people at a time when China’s earliest farming cultures were beginning,” said Dr.

Lesson Plan for Making a Speaker Laboratory ©1995 The Regents of the University of California by Regan Lum Introduction: A speaker is a device that converts an electronic signal into sound. How do rappers freestyle on the spot? Freestyle rappers such as Eminem and Philadelphia's Cassidy make up and bust out rhymes on the spot — a hugely challenging art form. Now, however, researchers have learned how the brain does it. A new study finds that when rappers improvise, parts of their brains linked to motivation, organization and integration get active, while portions responsible for self-monitoring and control get quiet. A CD spectrometer A simple spectrometer can be built from a CD and a box. Cut a slit on one side of the box. Place the CD on the other side with about 60 degree angle. Look down into the openning on the box.

How to Grasp Size, Scale and Temperature with Three Giant Infographics Jun 10, 2010 Here are three fantastic inforgraphics that will blow your mind. While the visuals help explain the sheer size, depth and temperature of things on our planet and in our Universe. You might feel slightly less significant :) Relatively speaking… Source: Karl Tate from Our Amazing Planet How to Extract DNA from Anything Living First, you need to find something that contains DNA. Since DNA is the blueprint for life, everything living contains DNA. For this experiment, we like to use green split peas. But there are lots of other DNA sources too, such as: Spinach Chicken liver Strawberries Broccoli Certain sources of DNA should not be used, such as:

Hands-on Activities for Teaching Biology to High School or Middle School Students by Drs. Ingrid Waldron and Jennifer Doherty, University of Pennsylvania The expression "hands-on, minds-on" summarizes the philosophy we have incorporated in these activities - namely, that students will learn best if they are actively engaged and if their activities are closely linked to understanding important biological concepts. Many of our activities are explicitly aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards, as indicated by (NGSS) in the descriptions below and the links to the right. Additional information is provided in Summary Tables and in the Teacher Preparation Notes for these activities.

7th Grader mimics Nature 13 year old copies Nature to Improve Solar Performance Thirteen year old Aidan Dwyer was walking in the woods in Upstate New York in the winter and noticed a spiral pattern to tree branches. Aidan realized the tree branches and leaves had a mathematical spiral pattern that could be shown as a fraction. After some research he also realized the mathematical fractions were the same numbers as the Fibonacci sequence. "On the oak tree, the Fibonacci fraction is 2/5, which means that the spiral takes five branches to spiral two times around the trunk to complete one pattern.