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Howard Zinn

Howard Zinn
Life and career[edit] Early life[edit] Zinn was born to a Jewish immigrant family in Brooklyn. His father, Eddie Zinn, born in Austria-Hungary, emigrated to the U.S. with his brother Samuel before the outbreak of World War I. Howard's mother, Jenny (Rabinowitz) Zinn,[4] emigrated from the Eastern Siberian city of Irkutsk. World War II[edit] On a post-doctoral research mission nine years later, Zinn visited the resort near Bordeaux where he interviewed residents, reviewed municipal documents, and read wartime newspaper clippings at the local library. Zinn wrote: I recalled flying on that mission, too, as deputy lead bombardier, and that we did not aim specifically at the 'Skoda works' (which I would have noted, because it was the one target in Czechoslovakia I had read about) but dropped our bombs, without much precision, on the city of Pilsen. Six years later, he wrote: Education[edit] After World War II, Zinn attended New York University on the GI Bill, graduating with a B.A. in 1951.

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Rogue State Official website of the author, historian, and U.S. foreign policy critic. A Guide to the World’s Only Superpower If you believed that the NATO (read U.S.) bombing of Yugoslavia for 78 days and nights in 1999 was a “humanitarian” act, Rogue State hopefully can serve as a wake-up call to both your intellect and your conscience. Is a college education worth the money? A member of the Class of 2010—who this season dons synthetic cap and gown, listens to the inspirational words of David Souter (Harvard), Anderson Cooper (Tulane), or Lisa Kudrow (Vassar), and collects a diploma—need not be a statistics major to know that the odds of stepping into a satisfying job, or, indeed, any job, are lower now than might have been imagined four long years ago, when the first posters were hung on a dorm-room wall, and having a .edu e-mail address was still a novelty. Statistically speaking, however, having an expertise in statistics may help in getting a job: according to a survey conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, graduates with math skills are more likely than their peers in other majors to find themselves promptly and gainfully employed. The safest of all degrees to be acquiring this year is in accounting: forty-six per cent of graduates in that discipline have already been offered jobs.

Graduation Day with Howard Zinn It's a beautiful day in May. The sun is streaming down; the birds are on their migration paths north; the first day lilies are just breaking into bloom -- and students are gathering for their graduation ceremonies on an afternoon when everything seems just right in a world where so much seems so wrong. These are the students who began their college lives within weeks, possibly days, even hours of that moment when, on September 11, 2001, the first hijacked plane hit the north tower of the World Trade Center. Certainly they -- above all classes of recent times -- have the right to peer into a murky future and wonder, with a certain trepidation, what's in store for them. Through no fault of their own, they have earned the right to discouragement, even perhaps despair.

The Threat of a Good Example, by Noam Chomsky (Excerpted from What Uncle Sam Really Wants) No country is exempt from U.S. intervention, no matter how unimportant. In fact, it's the weakest, poorest countries that often arouse the greatest hysteria. Take Laos in the 1960s, probably the poorest country in the world. Most of the people who lived there didn't even know there was such a thing as Laos; they just knew they had a little village and there was another little village nearby.

How the Notion That a College Degree Is Essentially Worthless Has Become One of the Year’s Most Fashionable Ideas Pity the American parent! Already beleaguered by depleted 401(k)s and gutted real-estate values, Ponzi schemes and toxic paper, burst bubbles and bear markets, he is now being asked to contend with a new specter: that college, the perennial hope for the next generation, may not be worth the price of the sheepskin on which it prints its degrees. As long as there have been colleges, there’s been an individualist, anti-college strain in American culture—an affinity for the bootstrap. But it is hard to think of a time when skepticism of the value of higher education has been more prominent than it is right now. Over the past several months, the same sharp and distressing arguments have been popping up in the Times, cable news, the blogosphere, even The Chronicle of Higher Education. The cost of college, as these arguments typically go, has grown far too high, the return far too uncertain, the education far too lax.

Howard Zinn The FBI’s Reading Room contains many files of public interest and historical value. In compliance with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) requirements, some of these records are no longer in the physical possession of the FBI, eliminating the FBI’s capability to re-review and/or re-process this material. Please note, that the information found in these files may no longer reflect the current beliefs, positions, opinions, or policies currently held by the FBI. The image quality contained within this site is subject to the condition of the original documents and original scanning efforts. These older files may contain processing procedures that are not compliant with current FOIA processing standards. All recently scanned images posted to the Reading Room adhere to the NARA 300 DPI standard.

Michael Parenti: Against Empire Richly informed and written in an engaging style, Michael Parenti’s Against Empire exposes the ruthless agenda and hidden costs of the U.S. empire. Documenting the pretexts and the lies used to justify violent intervention and maldevelopment abroad, he demonstrates how the conversion to a global economy is a victory of finance capital over democracy. As much of the world suffers unspeakable misery, and as the Third-Worldization of the Unites States accelerates, civil society is impoverished by policies that benefit the rich and powerful transnational corporations and the national security state.

Want Kids to Win the Future? Turn Them Into Makers — and Sci-Fi Fans Erwin Dral and his son, Hidde Bleeker, 6, build their own ArtBot at the PetBot booth during the 2010 Maker Faire in San Mateo, California.Photo: Jim Merithew/Wired.com Nolan Bushnell once almost destroyed his family’s garage. As a youngster in Utah, he went tooling around with a liquid-fuel rocket on a roller skate and things went awry. He (and the garage) survived, and Bushnell went on to be a lifelong innovator — from Pong to Chuck E. Remembering Howard Zinn / Chomsky It is not easy for me to write a few words about Howard Zinn, the great American activist and historian who passed away a few days ago. He was a very close friend for 45 years. The families were very close too.

The Face of Imperialism "A searing indictment of the ruthless nature of imperial capitalism. Eloquent, deeply researched, and beautifully argued, The Face of Imperialism is a truly wonderful book that is essential for understanding the world we live in. Parenti's compassionate voice is a much-needed corrective to the lies we are routinely fed." —Gregory Elich, author of Strange Liberators: Militarism, Mayhem, and the Pursuit of Profit "Michael Parenti's study of imperialism provides a timely and incisive framework for understanding the upheavals in North Africa and the Middle East.

Cheap linux computer I read an article yseterday (can't remember where and can't find it today) in which the quthor put together a cheap linux computer for $200, not including shipping and taxes. He built an AMD64 x2 with 1 gig ram and 4xx GB HD, 500 watt psu on an AM3 MB with on board sound and video. He built it to prove that you could build a linux box for a general purpose second computer much cheaper than you could get even a netbook that ran windows. I don't know if I would go as low as $200, but just as a point of general discussion, what would you put in a budget linux box? Those were my choices for a reasonably capable, low cost, expandable linux box. what would you choose?

Howard Zinn's Biased History tags: Howard Zinn, Daniel J. Flynn, historical criticism, Pequot War, historical theory, A People's History by Daniel J. Flynn

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