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Howard Zinn

Howard Zinn
Life and career[edit] Early life[edit] Zinn was born to a Jewish immigrant family in Brooklyn. His father, Eddie Zinn, born in Austria-Hungary, emigrated to the U.S. with his brother Samuel before the outbreak of World War I. World War II[edit] On a post-doctoral research mission nine years later, Zinn visited the resort near Bordeaux where he interviewed residents, reviewed municipal documents, and read wartime newspaper clippings at the local library. Zinn wrote: I recalled flying on that mission, too, as deputy lead bombardier, and that we did not aim specifically at the 'Skoda works' (which I would have noted, because it was the one target in Czechoslovakia I had read about) but dropped our bombs, without much precision, on the city of Pilsen. Six years later, he wrote: Recall that in the midst of the Gulf War, the U.S. military bombed an air raid shelter, killing 400 to 500 men, women, and children who were huddled to escape bombs. Education[edit] Academic career[edit] Related:  War & Peace

Noam Chomsky Avram Noam Chomsky (/ˈnoʊm ˈtʃɒmski/; born December 7, 1928) is an American linguist, philosopher,[21][22] cognitive scientist, logician,[23][24][25] political commentator and anarcho-syndicalist activist. Sometimes described as the "father of modern linguistics",[26][27] Chomsky is also a major figure in analytic philosophy.[21] He has spent most of his career at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he is currently Professor Emeritus, and has authored over 100 books. He has been described as a prominent cultural figure, and was voted the "world's top public intellectual" in a 2005 poll.[28] Born to a middle-class Ashkenazi Jewish family in Philadelphia, Chomsky developed an early interest in anarchism from relatives in New York City. Chomsky has been a highly influential academic figure throughout his career, and was cited within the field of Arts and Humanities more often than any other living scholar between 1980 and 1992. Early life Childhood: 1928–45

Mahatma Gandhi Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (pronounced [ˈmoːɦənd̪aːs ˈkərəmtʃənd̪ ˈɡaːnd̪ʱi] ( ); 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the preeminent leader of Indian nationalism in British-ruled India. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahatma (Sanskrit: "high-souled", "venerable"[2])—applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa,[3]—is now used worldwide. He is also called Bapu (Gujarati: endearment for "father",[4] "papa"[4][5]) in India. Gandhi famously led Indians in challenging the British-imposed salt tax with the 400 km (250 mi) Dandi Salt March in 1930, and later in calling for the British to Quit India in 1942. Gandhi is commonly, though not officially,[10] considered the Father of the Nation[11] in India. Early life and background Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi in his earliest known photo, aged 7, c. 1876 English barrister Civil rights movement in South Africa (1893–1914)

Rogue State Official website of the author, historian, and U.S. foreign policy critic. A Guide to the World’s Only Superpower If you believed that the NATO (read U.S.) bombing of Yugoslavia for 78 days and nights in 1999 was a “humanitarian” act, Rogue State hopefully can serve as a wake-up call to both your intellect and your conscience. It is a mini-encyclopedia of the numerous un-humanitarian acts perpetrated by the United States since the end of the Second World War. “Rogue State forcibly reminds us of Vice President Agnew’s immortal line: ‘The United States, for all its faults, is still the greatest nation in the country’.” – Gore Vidal, author, The Decline and Fall of the American Empire “Critics will call this a one-sided book. But it is an invaluable corrective to the establishment portrait of America as the world’s greatest force for peace. Table of Contents Introduction Ours and theirs: Washington’s love/hate relationship with terrorists and human-rights violators 1. Purchase Rogue State

List of anti-war organizations List of anti-war organizations From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search In order to facilitate organized, determined, and principled opposition to war, peace-centered activists have often founded anti-war organizations. Contents [hide] Society of Peace[edit] Origins International[edit] Africa[edit] Asia[edit] Europe[edit] North America[edit] United States[edit] Canada[edit] Oceania[edit] Religious[edit] Christian[edit] Buddhist[edit] Buddhist Peace Fellowship See also[edit] Retrieved from " Categories: Navigation menu Personal tools Namespaces Variants Views Actions Navigation Interaction Tools Print/export Languages Edit links This page was last modified on 25 May 2014 at 00:38.

Thích Quảng Đức Thích is a Buddhist honorary title and Quảng Đức is descriptive of meritorious attributes: see dharma name. Thích Quảng Đức[1] (1897 – 11 June 1963, born Lâm Văn Túc), was a Vietnamese Mahayana Buddhist monk who burned himself to death at a busy Saigon road intersection on 11 June 1963.[2] Quang Duc was protesting the persecution of Buddhists by the South Vietnamese government led by Ngô Đình Diệm. Photographs of his self-immolation were circulated widely across the world and brought attention to the policies of the Diệm government. John F. Kennedy said in reference to a photograph of Duc on fire, "No news picture in history has generated so much emotion around the world as that one. Quang Duc's act increased international pressure on Diệm and led him to announce reforms with the intention of mollifying the Buddhists. Biography[edit] Accounts of the life of Quảng Đức are derived from information disseminated by Buddhist organizations. Religious background[edit] Self-immolation[edit] [edit]

Category:Peace organizations From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Peace organizations are part of the Peace movement. See also Category:Anti-nuclear weapons movement for organizations which focus on opposition to nuclear weapons and/or nuclear testing. International Society for Peace Subcategories This category has the following 13 subcategories, out of 13 total. Pages in category "Peace organizations" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 292 total. (previous 200) (next 200)(previous 200) (next 200) Countdown to Zero Official Film Site War "Conflict zone" redirects here. For the 2001 video game, see Conflict Zone. The War by Tadeusz Cyprian (1949), a photograph in the collection of the National Museum in Warsaw showing ruins of Warsaw's Napoleon Square in the aftermath of World War II. War is a state of armed conflict between societies. It is generally characterized by extreme collective aggression, destruction, and usually high mortality. While some scholars see war as a universal and ancestral aspect of human nature,[1] others argue that it is only a result of specific socio-cultural or ecological circumstances.[2] Etymology The English word war derives from the late Old English (circa.1050) words wyrre and werre, from Old French werre (also guerre as in modern French), in turn from the Frankish *werra, ultimately deriving from the Proto-Germanic *werzō 'mixture, confusion'. Types Main article: Types of war Behaviour and conduct The behaviour of troops in warfare varies considerably, both individually and as units or armies.

The Threat of a Good Example, by Noam Chomsky (Excerpted from What Uncle Sam Really Wants) No country is exempt from U.S. intervention, no matter how unimportant. In fact, it's the weakest, poorest countries that often arouse the greatest hysteria. Take Laos in the 1960s, probably the poorest country in the world. But as soon as a very low-level social revolution began to develop there, Washington subjected Laos to a murderous "secret bombing," virtually wiping out large settled areas in operations that, it was conceded, had nothing to do with the war the US was waging in South Vietnam. Grenada has a hundred thousand people who produce a little nutmeg, and you could hardly find it on a map. From the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 till the collapse of the Communist governments in Eastern Europe in the late 1980s, it was possible to justify every US attack as a defense against the Soviet threat. The attack against Nicaragua was justified by the claim that if we don't stop "them" there, they'll be pouring across the border at Harlingen, Texas-just two days' drive away.

List of peace activists This list of peace activists includes people who've proactively advocated diplomatic, philosophical, and non-military resolution of major territorial or ideological disputes through nonviolent means and methods. Peace activists usually work with others in the overall peace movement to focus the world's attention on the irrationality of violent conflicts, decisions, and actions. They thus initiate and facilitate wide public dialogues aimed at nonviolently altering long-standing societal agreements directly related to, and held in place by, the various irrational, violent, habitual, and historically fearful thought-processes residing at the core of these conflicts, with the intention of peacefully ending the conflicts themselves.

Michael Parenti: Against Empire Richly informed and written in an engaging style, Michael Parenti’s Against Empire exposes the ruthless agenda and hidden costs of the U.S. empire. Documenting the pretexts and the lies used to justify violent intervention and maldevelopment abroad, he demonstrates how the conversion to a global economy is a victory of finance capital over democracy. As much of the world suffers unspeakable misery, and as the Third-Worldization of the Unites States accelerates, civil society is impoverished by policies that benefit the rich and powerful transnational corporations and the national security state. The empire feeds off the resources of the republic, and the hard-won gains made by ordinary people are swept away. The history of imperialism is also, however, a history of resistance, struggle, and achievement; Against Empire offers compelling alternatives for progressive change. Contents Imperialism 101 An introduction to the process by which political and economic domination is achieved.

History of U.S. Military Interventions since 1890 by Dr. Zoltan Grossman The following is a partial list of U.S. military interventions from 1890 to 2011. Below the list is a Briefing on the History of U.S. The list and briefing are also available as a powerpoint presentation. This guide does not include: mobilizations of the National Guard offshore shows of naval strength reinforcements of embassy personnel the use of non-Defense Department personnel (such as the Drug Enforcement Administration) military exercises non-combat mobilizations (such as replacing postal strikers) the permanent stationing of armed forces covert actions where the U.S. did not play a command and control role the use of small hostage rescue units most uses of proxy troops U.S. piloting of foreign warplanes foreign or domestic disaster assistance military training and advisory programs not involving direct combat civic action programs and many other military activities. Versions of this list have been published on Zmag.org, Neravt.com, and numerous other websites.

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