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Stache - A smarter way to bookmark web pages for Mac, iPhone and iPad Learn | The Hour of Code Dance Party Grades 2+ | Blocks Minecraft Hour of Code Make a Flappy game Star Wars: Building a Galaxy with Code Grades 2+ | Blocks, JavaScript Code with Anna and Elsa Write your first computer program Minecraft Hour of Code: AI for Good The Grinch: Saving Christmas with Code Grades 2-8 | Blocks Make Your Own Kodable Mazes Pre-reader - Grade 5 | JavaScript, Language independent (can be taught in multiple languages) codeSpark Academy with The Foos: Create Games Pre-reader - Grade 5 | Blocks Code Your Hero Lightbot Coding Town Grades 2-5 | JavaScript Kodable (pre-readers welcome) Pre-reader - Grade 5 | Blocks | All modern browsers, iPad app Create your own Google logo Grades 2+ | Blocks, Scratch Codesters: Basketball Grades 6+ | Python Box Island All ages | Blocks Gumball's Coding Adventure Grades 6-8 | Blocks, Scratch Imagine a World Moana: Wayfinding with Code Barbie You Can Be Anything Pre-reader - Grade 5 | Blocks, Tynker Code a Cartoon Animate a Name Learn to Code with Crossy Road Grades 9+ | Blocks Boat Race Candy Quest

10 places where anyone can learn to code Teens, tweens and kids are often referred to as “digital natives.” Having grown up with the Internet, smartphones and tablets, they’re often extraordinarily adept at interacting with digital technology. But Mitch Resnick, who spoke at TEDxBeaconStreet, is skeptical of this descriptor. Sure, young people can text and chat and play games, he says, “but that doesn’t really make you fluent.” Mitch Resnick: Let's teach kids to code Fluency, Resnick proposes in this TED Talk, comes not through interacting with new technologies, but through creating them. The point isn’t to create a generation of programmers, Resnick argues. In his talk, Resnick describes Scratch, the programming software that he and a research group at MIT Media Lab developed to allow people to easily create and share their own interactive games and animations. At Codecademy, you can take lessons on writing simple commands in JavaScript, HTML and CSS, Python and Ruby. While we’re at it: bonus!

Presentations ETC Homepage Use these free backgrounds, templates, letters, frames, and buttons for school presentations, websites, class newsletters, digital scrapbooking, and student portfolios. Thousands of presentation elements and millions of combinations allow you to customize your school projects, electronic scrapbook, or eportfolio. A friendly license allows teachers and students to use up to 50 items in a single, non-commercial project without further permission. Select from over 20,000 background slides for your next presentation. The images are available in the 1024x768 size. Many of the backgrounds include transparent cutouts to layer over photographs. Extras Select from over 30,000 extras to include in your next presentation. Themes and templates

Microsoft PowerPoint Templates and Backgrounds | PowerPoint Themes That's why we deliver only the very best premium PowerPoint templates to suit every need. From athletics to science and from people to religion, we offer the most comprehensive and usable database of Microsoft PowerPoint backgrounds you'll find anywhere on the web. Free PowerPoint themes for every person and every business Microsoft PowerPoint is a versatile program used all over the world in boardrooms, classrooms, community centers, and even homes. But despite its many useful features, built-in PowerPoint themes leave something to be desired. Try something new with professional graphics and high-quality free PowerPoint templates from SmileTemplates. Free Microsoft PowerPoint backgrounds designed to suit your needs Whatever your business, school assignment, or community group, we have options that will work for you. Free PowerPoint templates that are easy to download, easy to use We're not all tech geniuses, and that's why we've made our PowerPoint templates as easy to use as possible.

HOW TO: Make Your QR Codes More Beautiful Hamilton Chan is CEO and founder of Paperlinks. With the free Paperlinks iPhone app, featured previously by Apple as the #1 New & Noteworthy app, consumers can scan and view QR code content with a native app experience. Paperlinks also provides a powerful platform for generating QR codes, hosting content and tracking their performance. The QR code: A thing of beauty or an eyesore? Fortunately, QR codes are malleable and can be redesigned in truly extraordinary ways, while still maintaining their scanability. QR codes have so much potential from a design perspective, so let’s take a look at a few tricks and techniques you should keep in mind when designing a code to enhance your brand and appeal to your audience. 1. The easiest way to add branding power to your code is to add color to it. A “reversed out” code, where the background is dark and the boxes are light colored, is generally not recommended. 2. One of the QR code’s greatest aesthetic flaws is its numerous hard edges. 3. 4.

How to Use QR Codes in Student Projects Scannable bar codes may be just what you need to spark some student interest in your classroom - read on to learn how to use them to showcase your student work and give some life to your classroom's infographics. Last April ago I took a trip to Tokyo, Japan. One thing that really stood out to me there was the abundance of these scannable barcodes. These things were everywhere - flyers, posters, billboards, even in advertisements on the sides of commercial vans. The world as we know it is becoming scannable. So, what is a QR code? "A QR Code is a matrix barcode (or two-dimensional code), readable by QR scanners, mobile phones with a camera, and smartphones...scan the image of the QR Code to display text, contact information, connect to a wireless network, or open a web page in the phone's browser." - Wikipedia How do I make a QR code? My favorite way to create them is with bit.ly, a free URL shortener that now automatically creates QR codes for your shortened URLs. Reports & Projects

QR Codes and Bottle Cap Fun! Technology is awesome because not only does it keeps students engaged, it's also usually pretty environment-friendly! So, I've decided to combine two fun items I've been incorporating in my classroom - QR codes and labeling bottle caps - to help students practice ordering fractions, multi-digit multiplication, and long division - just a few skills we're going over in fourth grade right now. Let's start with ordering fractions: I made 8 bottle cap groups with six fractions in each group using Avery lables (1" circles 5410). And then, lo and behold, did you know you can make QR codes in Avery? Am I making sense? Now on to multi-digit multiplication and long division: I made 6 problems each, using the same Avery labels. Then, through the QR code button on the Avery website, I made QR codes with the answers to put on the inside of the caps. Got a scan app on you right now? Click on the image below to download the freebie. I also have some really fun QR code titles for just $2 a piece.

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