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Aikido

Aikido
Aikido Demonstration, 2013 Aikido (Japanese: 合気道, Hepburn: aikidō?) [aikiꜜdoː] is a modern Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba as a synthesis of his martial studies, philosophy, and religious beliefs. Aikido is often translated as "the way of unifying (with) life energy"[1] or as "the way of harmonious spirit".[2] Ueshiba's goal was to create an art that practitioners could use to defend themselves while also protecting their attacker from injury.[3][4] Aikido derives mainly from the martial art of Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu, but began to diverge from it in the late 1920s, partly due to Ueshiba's involvement with the Ōmoto-kyō religion. Ueshiba's early students' documents bear the term aiki-jūjutsu.[6] Ueshiba's senior students have different approaches to aikido, depending partly on when they studied with him. Etymology and basic philosophy[edit] The word "aikido" is formed of three kanji: History[edit] Initial development[edit] Religious influences[edit] Ki[edit] Training[edit]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aikido

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List of muscles of the human body This is a table of muscles of the human anatomy. There are approximately 642 skeletal muscles within the typical human, and almost every muscle constitutes one part of a pair of identical bilateral muscles, found on both sides, resulting in approximately 320 pairs of muscles, as presented in this article. Nevertheless, the exact number is difficult to define because different sources group muscles differently, e.g. regarding what is defined as different parts of a single muscle or as several muscles. Examples range from 640 to 850.[1] The muscles of the human body can be categorized into a number of groups which include muscles relating to the head and neck, muscles of the torso or trunk, muscles of the upper limbs, and muscles of the lower limbs.

Tahtib Two men practicing Tahtib on an Ostraca, Ancient Egypt Tahtib (Egyptian Arabic: تحطيب taḥṭīb) is the Modern Egyptian term for a traditional form of Egyptian folk dance involving a wooden stick, also known as "stick dance" or "cane dance".[1] It is sometimes also described as a "stick-dancing game", or as a highly ritualized mock fight accompanied by music.[2] A "Nubian" form of tahtib is regularly performed for tourists in Aswan.[3] The stick[edit] Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu (大東流合気柔術?), originally called Daitō-ryū Jujutsu (大東流柔術, Daitō-ryū Jūjutsu?), is a Japanese martial art that first became widely known in the early 20th century under the headmastership of Takeda Sokaku. Takeda had extensive training in several martial arts (including Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage-ryū and sumo) and referred to the style he taught as "Daitō-ryū" (literally, "Great Eastern School"). Although the school's traditions claim to extend back centuries in Japanese history there are no known extant records regarding the ryū before Takeda.

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AIKIDO - The Peaceful Martial Art The Peaceful Martial Art The video above is from 2007, at my present dojo Enighet in Malmö, Sweden. The photo to the right is from 1974, with an adolescent me as uke to Ichimura sensei, my aikido teacher at that time. Kenpō Kenpō (拳法?) is the name of several Japanese martial arts. The word kenpō is a Japanese translation of the Chinese word "quán fǎ". This term is also sometimes transliterated as "kempo", as a result of applying Traditional Hepburn romanization,[1] but failing to use a macron to indicate the long vowel. The generic nature of the term combined with its widespread, cross-cultural adoption in the martial arts community has led to many divergent definitions.[2]

Comparison of karate styles The table contains a comparison of karate styles. Some of the distinguishing features are listed, such as lineage, general form of stances, and number of kata. However, the differences attributed to "style" are often a reflection of the disposition and preference of the teaching instructor (i.e. there are softer and harder schools of each style, some schools focus little on kata while others emphasise it, some will add or remove certain kata, etc.). People Can Draw Energy From Other People The Same Way Plants Do A biological research team at Bielefeld University has made a groundbreaking discovery showing that plants can draw an alternative source of energy from other plants. This finding could also have a major impact on the future of bioenergy eventually providing the evidence to show that people draw energy from others in much the same way. Members of Professor Dr. Olaf Kruse’s biological research team have confirmed for the first time that a plant, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, not only engages in photosynthesis, but also has an alternative source of energy: it can draw it from other plants. The research findings were released this week in the online journal Nature Communications published by the renowned journal Nature. Flowers need water and light to grow and people are no different.

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Enshin kaikan Enshin kaikan (円心会館?) is a style of "full contact karate", or Knockdown karate, founded in 1988 with dojo and students in various countries around the world. The core emphasis in Enshin is use of the Sabaki Method, a system of techniques employed with the goal of turning an opponent's power and momentum against him or her and repositioning oneself to the opponent's "blind" spot to counterattack from a more advantageous position. Although Enshin is a "stand-up fighting" style that includes kicks, strikes, and punches found in most other styles of karate, it also utilizes numerous grabs, sweeps, and throws often associated with Judo or other grappling styles of martial arts. Enshin was founded by Jōkō Ninomiya who directs the Enshin organization from the honbu in Denver, Colorado. Meaning of name[edit]

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