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Education Research Highlights From 2015

Education Research Highlights From 2015
2015 was a great year for education research. fMRI technology gave us new insight into how exercise can improve math ability by changing the structure of children's brains (#13 below). We saw how Sesame Street's 40-year history has made an impact on preparing young children for school (#7). Several studies reinforced the importance of social and emotional learning for students (#2, 5, and 9). Two must-read publications were released to help educators understand how students learn (#4 and 11). Here are 15 studies published this year that every educator should know about. 1. A classroom's physical learning space makes a difference in how well students learn. Barrett, P. 2. Kindness matters. Jones, D. 3. Did you know that participating in theatre programs can help students with autism learn to play in groups, communicate with others, and recognize faces? Corbett, B. 4. If you’re looking for an excellent review of research on how students learn, check out The Science of Learning. 5. 6. 7.

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8 Characteristics Of A Great Teacher 8 Characteristics Of A Great Teacher by Ian Lancaster What makes a teacher strong? What differentiates the best from the rest? There’s no shortage of bodies (some dramatically misguided) attempting to solve this riddle. The answers are nebulous at best. Why You Shouldn’t Innovate "Just because something doesn't do what you planned it to do doesn't mean it's useless." ~Thomas A. Edison "If everyone has to think outside the box, maybe it is the box that needs fixing." ~Malcolm Gladwell Inquiry Learning From HookED Wiki HOT Inquiry Self Assessment Rubrics Toc(For Professional Discussion within schools working with Hooked on Thinking on Inquiry Learning) HOT Rubrics for Stages in Research Process: File:HOT RESEARCH INQUIRY RUBRIC BLANK.pdf HOT Rubrics for Stages in Inquiry Process.

Can a Truly Student-Centered Education Be Available to All? Unschooling is a hotly debated topic on MindShift. This subset of home schooling, which doesn’t use any set curriculum and is instead directed by the child’s interests, is vastly different from traditional public and private schools. While the freedom inherent in the model excites some readers, others question whether young people educated this way will learn the important information and skills they need to become productive adults in our society.

12 Critical Competencies For Leadership in the Future 12 Critical Competencies For Leadership in the Future The rate of change in the business world today is greater than our ability to respond. In a world that is often described as VUCA (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and ambiguous), there are major tectonic shifts that demand a new mindset of leadership. First, let us look at these shifts. In recent years, we have seen disruption of market leaders like Kodak and Nokia amongst many others. How to Bring Playfulness to High School Students It’s easy to focus on academics and college transcripts when children become tweens and teens, but retaining the agency and creativity inherent in play is crucial for them, too. But what is the high school equivalent for the kind of inquisitive learning that happens when little kids play in the sandbox, finger-paint, build with blocks or play make-believe? “When your 4-year-old is dipping his hand in the rice table, he’s learning really important things about tactile touch,” said Denise Pope, senior lecturer at Stanford’s Graduate School of Education and co-founder of Challenge Success. “Older kids need those same tactile, hands-on experiences to learn as well.” Teenagers need creative outlets, just like elementary school children. Those experiences helps open their brains in different ways, gets them excited about learning and allows them to have fun.

Research-based Strategies to Help Children Develop Self-Control It all started when psychology professor Walter Mischel was watching his four closely-spaced daughters growing up. He realized he had no idea what was going on in their brains that made it possible for a child who at one moment had no impulse control and just a few months later could inhibit her emotions, wait for things and have conversations. He became curious about how children develop these skills, which led to the famous marshmallow experiment conducted at the Bing Nursery School on Stanford’s campus, where Mischel was a professor. That study has become famous over the last 50 years, leading to many hilarious YouTube videos (none of which are the original test subjects) and a lifetime’s work examining how various strategies can help both adults and children learn to delay gratification. In the original marshmallow study, researchers spent time building up trust and rapport with their 4-year-old subjects before starting the experiment.

Start with a Question: Innovative Teaching Requires Innovative PD: 5 Solutions If school and district leaders want teachers to take risks and innovate in their classrooms, then those leaders must take similar risks when designing professional development. Modeling is not overrated. Let me repeat that: Modeling is NOT overrated. Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff An idea that is beginning to gain a lot of favour in educational circles at the moment is the notion of fixed versus growth mindsets, and how they might relate to students and learning. Based on the work of Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of where ability comes from. It has recently been seized upon by educators as a tool to explore our knowledge of student achievement, and ways that such achievement might be improved. However, in my work, I have found that the notion of developing a growth mindset is as equally applicable to staff and teacher performance as it is to students. This article begins with a brief discussion about the difference between the two mindsets, what that means for education, and concludes with some ideas for how school leaders might seek to develop a growth mindset amongst their staff.

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