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Chronas

Chronas

http://chronas.org/history

Related:  Histoire - GéographieTech ToolsSOCIAL STUDIES - Timelines & MapsDIDATTICA SCUOLAUso delle Timeline

Declassified US Nuclear Targets Even though today’s nuclear targets list is classified, it probably doesn’t look dramatically different. The United States still has about 1,900 nuclear warheads deployed on missiles and bombers (with thousands more on reserve), ready to be launched at a moment’s notice and able to hit their targets within 30 minutes. This unstable situation is extremely risky and has repeatedly come close to triggering nuclear war by accident. Moreover, many of today’s hydrogen bombs are hundreds of times more powerful than the two atom bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. If a nuclear war were to break out today, nuclear winter might kill most people on Earth.

6 Ways to Publish Your Own Book Shevonne Polastre is a freelance Technical Writer who assists companies and non-profits. She authors FreeAgentWriter, a blog about the technology world. Online self-publishing services have given users the tools they need to create, publish and promote their work. These sites allow authors to bypass the process of finding an agent and pitching to publishing houses, a venture that can take months, if not years.

How to Create a Multimedia Timeline on HSTRY Last fall I reviewed HSTRY when it was still in beta. Recently, it lost the beta label and opened to everyone who wants to use it to create multimedia timelines. One of the features of HSTRY that I love is the option to insert quiz questions throughout your timelines. OneZoom: l'evoluzione delle specie animali in un albero interattivo Search the tree find most recent common ancestor How to use About this tree Data sources Settings Sponsor a leaf Back to home Image Sources Tree Shape Back Any Public Domain Verified Back Spiral Natural Fern Balanced Back Here's Everyone Who's Immigrated to the U.S. Since 1820 From 1820 to 2013, 79 million people obtained lawful permanent resident status in the United States. The interactive map below visualizes all of them based on their prior country of residence. The brightness of a country corresponds to its total migration to the U.S. at the given time.

Some Handy Google Maps Tutorials for Teachers March 11, 2015 Google Maps is an excellent tool to use with students to develop their spatial thinking. Beyond getting driving or walking directions to the other, this tool enables students to discover the world right from their classrooms. It is also a very good way to teach students about geography concepts, distance measurement, map readings and other fundamentals of mapping such as longitude, latitude, locations and many more. There are actually several ways to use Google Maps with students. Here are some few examples suggested by Google:

Coding Join the movement and introduce a group of students to their first hour of computer science with these steps: 1) Watch this how-to video 2) Choose a tutorial for your hour: We provide a variety of fun, hour-long tutorials for students of all ages, created by a variety of partners. Mapped: The world's nuclear power plants NUCLEAR | March 8. 2016. 17:19 Mapped: The world’s nuclear power plants From the latest crisis over plans for Hinkley Point in the UK, to Friday’s fifth anniversary of the Fukushima disaster, nuclear power plants are currently much in the news. To help provide a global overview of the nuclear power sector both today and throughout its history, Carbon Brief has produced this interactive map. It shows the location, operating status and generating capacity of all 667 reactors that have been built, or are under construction, around the world, ever since Russia’s tiny Obninsk plant became the first to supply power to the grid in 1954. Changing fortunes

Homeschool Geography & Maps Activities and Games Free Downloads Geography & Maps The following downloads are provided for those of you who purchased a hard copy of this curriculum. These are color copies that you can print out on your own computer or take to a copy center. (Downloads provide color patterns only, no instructions.) Apps in Action: Creating engaging presentations with Adobe Slate For me, one of the best things about using mobile technology in the classroom is that it allows users to create and share amazing content that previously would have been impossible. There are a range of fantastic tools out there which facilitate this, depending on the type of content you wish to create, but one that has caught my interest recently is Adobe Slate. Adobe is on a roll and offers a wide range of superb apps for iOS devices. Slate was even made it on to the App Store’s Best of 2015 list. Below is an example of a presentation made using Adobe Slate, focusing on a case study of the volcanic eruption at Mt. St.

Timeline Timeline allows students to create a graphical representation of an event or process by displaying items sequentially along a line. Timelines can be organized by time of day, date, or event, and the tool allows users to create a label with short or long descriptive text. Adding an image for each label makes a timeline more visually appealing. Add, drag, and rearrange items as needed. Saving capability allows students to return to their work and make revisions, and they can share their final work via e-mail. For additional ideas on how to use this tool outside of the classroom, see Timeline in the Parent & Afterschool Resources section. Create & Find Free Multimedia Lessons Make mobile learning awesome! Student creation Share materials Free! Get our new app! Save time by using free lessons & activities created by educators worldwide! Be inspired!

Chronas is a history project linking Wikipedia and Wikidata with a chronological and cartographical view. The Chronas home page has 11 images representative of the world at different times. For example, an image of a painting of Genghis Khan has the title “1248: Mongols Invade East-Europe.” Click on the image and you can read a short article about Genghis Khan and his empire. Click the map to the right of the article and you’ll be taken to an interactive map of the world as borders appeared in 1248. Once you are on the interactive Chronas map, you can adjust the time slider at the bottom of the page to see national boundaries change through the course of history. Stop the time slider at any point and click on the map to reveal a Wikipedia entry about that nation. In the upper left corner of the Chronas map is an option to explore various sets of data. In the data sets, you can find “sunburst” visualizations of population demographics according to year. You’ll also find aggregations of data that show you population distribution by ruler or empire. In addition, Chronas offers the option to turn on additional markers for cities, battles, artifacts, and famous people. When you activate the additional markers, they’ll appear on the map in the proper geographic context for the time you’ve selected on the map’s time slider. Each marker is interactive. Clicking on the marker will take you to a Wikipedia entry related to the item represented by the map marker. by libtechchez Jan 6

Chronas is a history project linking Wikipedia and Wikidata with a chronological and cartographical view. The Chronas home page has 11 images representative of the world at different times. For example, an image of a painting of Genghis Khan has the title “1248: Mongols Invade East-Europe.” Click on the image and you can read a short article about Genghis Khan and his empire. Click the map to the right of the article and you’ll be taken to an interactive map of the world as borders appeared in 1248. Once you are on the interactive Chronas map, you can adjust the time slider at the bottom of the page to see national boundaries change through the course of history. Stop the time slider at any point and click on the map to reveal a Wikipedia entry about that nation. In the upper left corner of the Chronas map is an option to explore various sets of data. In the data sets, you can find “sunburst” visualizations of population demographics according to year. You’ll also find aggregations of data that show you population distribution by ruler or empire. In addition, Chronas offers the option to turn on additional markers for cities, battles, artifacts, and famous people. When you activate the additional markers, they’ll appear on the map in the proper geographic context for the time you’ve selected on the map’s time slider. Each marker is interactive. Clicking on the marker will take you to a Wikipedia entry related to the item represented by the map marker. by libtechchez Jan 6

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