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Learn Your Damn Homophones

Learn Your Damn Homophones
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Handy Latin Phrases mental_floss Blog » Debunking Grammar Myths This week we're joined by a special guest blogger. Patricia T. O'Conner, a former editor at The New York Times Book Review, is the author of the national best-seller Woe Is I: The Grammarphobe's Guide to Better English in Plain English, as well as other books about language. She is a regular monthly guest on public radio station WNYC in New York. Learn more at her website, grammarphobia.com. Make her feel welcome! When I think about the rules of grammar I sometimes recall the story—and it's a true one—about a lecture given in the 1950s by an eminent British philosopher of language. Don't we all sometimes feel like that voice from the back of the room? English is not so much a human invention as it is a force of nature, one that endures and flourishes despite our best attempts to ruin it. So when you think about the rules of grammar, try to think like that guy in the back of the room, and never be afraid to challenge what seems silly or useless. Myth #1: Don't Split an Infinitive.

A Picture of Language Joe Mortis Draft is a series about the art and craft of writing. The curious art of diagramming sentences was invented 165 years ago by S.W. Clark, a schoolmaster in Homer, N.Y. [1] His book, published in 1847, was called “A Practical Grammar: In which Words, Phrases, and Sentences Are Classified According to Their Offices and Their Various Relations to One Another.” His goal was to simplify the teaching of English grammar. It was more than 300 pages long, contained information on such things as unipersonal verbs and “rhetorico-grammatical figures,” and provided a long section on Prosody, which he defined as “that part of the Science of Language which treats of utterance.” Before diagramming, grammar was taught by means of its drabber older sibling, parsing. Put simply, parsing requires the student to break down a sentence into its component words, classifying each in terms of its part of speech, as well as its tense, number and function in the sentence. But there are differences. Mr. Mr.

FREE Online Rhyming Dictionary 10 Latin Phrases You Pretend to Understand Our 8th annual ‘10 Issue’ is on newsstands now. This week, we’ll be highlighting some of our favorite lists from past installments. The following article comes from the 4th annual edition. By Kevin Fleming Whether you’re deciphering a cryptic state seal or trying to impress your Catholic in-laws, knowing some Latin has its advantages. 1. Before money-back guarantees and 20-year warranties, caveat emptor was indispensable advice for the consumer. 2. Remember your old college buddy, the one everybody called Chugger? 3. When you wake up in the New Orleans Parish Prison after a foggy night at Mardi Gras, remember this one. 4. When all those spirited mental wrestling matches you have about existentialism start growing old (yeah, right!) 5. Less unique than it sounds, America’s original national motto, e pluribus unum, was plagiarized from an ancient recipe for salad dressing. 6. 7. 8. Ad majorem dei gloriam is often shortened to AMDG. 9. Carpe diem is so 20th century. 10.

World Wide Words Comics :: Grammar This is a grammar comic about the proper usage of who versus whom. A look at the meaning of "flushing out an idea." This comic will LITERALLY make butterflies explode out of your underpants. A guide explaining when to use i.e. instead of e.g. A little bit ironic, dontcha think? The most feared punctuation on earth. The right way to use an apostrophe (in illustrated form). All artwork and content on this site is Copyright © 2016 Matthew Inman.

: Quick and Dirty Tips ™ Mignon Fogarty is the creator of Grammar Girl and the founder and managing director of Quick and Dirty Tips. A magazine writer, technical writer, and entrepreneur, she has served as a senior editor and producer at a number of health and science web sites. She has a B.A. in English from the University of Washington in Seattle and an M.S. in biology from Stanford University. Mignon believes that learning is fun, and the vast rules of grammar are wonderful fodder for lifelong study. Grammar Girl provides short, friendly tips to improve your writing. To book a lecture event with Mignon Fogarty for your company or organization, contact Macmillan Speakers. Follow Mignon on Google+, Twitter, Facebook, StumbleUpon, LinkedIn, and Pinterest. Awards Media The Oprah Winfrey Show, Grammar Girl Fixes Common Mistakes, March 2007 "Mignon has come up with clever ideas to help even the most grammatically challenged person remember the rules." New York Times, Book Not Ready for Print? Los Angeles Times

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