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Bedömningen börjar i planeringen så vad gör vi på lektionen?

Bedömningen börjar i planeringen så vad gör vi på lektionen?

http://lrbloggar.se/annikasjodahl/bedomningen-borjar-i-planeringen-sa-vad-gor-vi-pa-lektionen/

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English Language Arts: Writing Prompts/Journal Topics What is... What is something you dislike about yourself? What is something you do well? What is your favourite room in your home and why? What is a good neighbour? More Free Graphic Organizers for Teaching Writing More Free Graphic Organizers for Teaching Writing Introduction The free graphic organizers that I offer on this page come from the collection of 50 More WRITERizers, the successor of 50 WRITERizers, which has generated loads of interest over the last couple of years—thanks to you and our colleagues. I truly believe that this newer collection breaks completely new ground. I just simply haven’t seen anything ANYWHERE that is anything like what you are about to see here. These graphic organizers feature…

Short stories - two stars and a wish! Take a look at the film before Wednesday, please. Remember that you have to finish your first version on Wednesday. The phrases below are made by Mia Smith and her students in Gothenburg! Thanks! STARS Variation and vocabulary Your language is varied. Sara Bruuns klassrum: Film Homework for Wednesday 22nd of January is to watch this film and make sure you understand the phrases. Before you fly away with your text take a look at the things below. Perhaps you find something you need to work more with. (The phrases below are made by Mia Smith and her pupils year 9 Herrgårdsskolan, Gothenburg) Checklist for news report Checklist Feedback given by: ______________________________________ Does the text answer all the questions: WhatWhereWhenWhyWhoHow Is the text: Clear: and only has short words?

Teaching Opinion, Informative & Narrative Writing Types Free Posters and Infographic: Teaching the Three Types of Writing The Common Core State Standards require that students know three main types of writing: opinion/argumentative, informative/explanatory and narrative. What are these types of writing and how can you explain them to students? Our classroom posters help you break it down by comparing the three types to the work of reporters, storytellers and debaters. Share them with your students today. Then check out our infographic for teachers that explores the similarities and differences between opinion/argumentative, informative/explanatory and narrative types of writing, as well as concrete ways teachers can introduce them in the classroom.

Sentence Frames: Helping Students Become Writers It’s a common scene in many elementary classrooms: a student sits and stares at a blank paper because they were asked to write and don’t know how to start or they can’t think of the right words. Whether students are asked to write a story, answer questions, or practice vocabulary words, many have difficulty figuring out how to start writing. What is a strategy that teachers can use to help students with this problem?

SVOMPT - word order in English SVOMPT rule is one of the most important rules in English. If students learn to follow this rule, their English will improve dramatically, and they will be understood. Once a student knows some words and follows the SVOMPT rule, we can say that he/she can speak English. I love Darren Crown’s explanation of the origin of the SVOMPT word order. Engelska We will rehearse for the national test in English. We will listen to a few listening comprehensions and read a few reading comprehensions from previous years and have a look at how to avoid some common misstakes. You can find the tests here. We will also read a few essay examples to learn from their good and bad solutions. Below I give you some links to introduce yourself in a formal and informal way, and the liking words you might use to compare and contrast. I have also put up some posters to visualize what it means.

Collaborative writing activities Collaborative writing Some teachers tend to avoid writing in class, perhaps feeling that as it is something which learners do individually and in silence, it is better done for homework. However, when writing is done as a collaborative activity, it can have many of the same benefits of a group speaking activity: Discussing the writing process obviously provides more opportunities for learners to interact in English, a benefit in itself. It can also help learners to develop their communicative competence by forcing the negotiation of meaning.

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