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Book Review Site for Librarians in Public Libraries and School Libraries

Book Review Site for Librarians in Public Libraries and School Libraries

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Book Reviews, Author Interviews, Book Blogs Donald Harstad worked for 26 years as deputy sheriff and chief investigator for the police department of Clayton County, Iowa. Harstad transforms those experiences into thrilling mysteries with his popular Carl Houseman series. The sixth in the series, November Rain, finds Houseman far from his usual heartland setting, as he travels to the UK to consult on a kidnapping case—and to protect his own daughter. In a guest post, Harstad shares a bit of the real-life inspiration behind November Rain. Guest post by Donald Harstad

The 25 Best Websites for Literature Lovers It’s an interesting relationship that book lovers have with the Internet: most would rather read a physical book than something on an iPad or Kindle, and even though an Amazon purchase is just two or three clicks away, dedicated readers would rather take a trip to their local indie bookstore. Yet the literary world occupies a decent-sized space on the web. Readers, writers, publishers, editors, and everybody in between are tweeting, Tumbling, blogging, and probably even Vine-ing about their favorite books. In case the demise of Google Reader threw your literary Internet browsing into a dark void, here’s a list of 25 book sites to bookmark. The Millions Ten years is a mighty long time in terms of Internet life, but that’s how long The Millions has been kicking out a steady stream of reviews, essays, and links.

Booktopia - A Book Bloggers' Paradise - The No. 1 Book Blog for Australia To celebrate January, Booktopia’s Month of Australian Stories, we asked you just who is Australia’s Favourite Novelist. The response was overwhelming, and after tens of thousands of votes were cast, these are the results. Australia’s 50 Favourite Australian Novelists for 2013. If you aren’t familiar with any of them, there’s no better time than now to get familiar and celebrate Australian Literature this year with Booktopia, Australia’s Local Bookstore. 50. Peter Temple Obsolete Microkernel Dooms Mac OS X to Lag Linux in Performance Disagreements exist about whether or not microkernels are good. It's easy to get the impression they're good because they were proposed as a refinement after monolithic kernels. Microkernels are mostly discredited now, however, because they have performance problems, and the benefits originally promised are a fantasy. The microkernel zealot believes that several cooperating system processes should take over the monolithic kernel's traditional jobs.

Children's Books For Publishers All All Subject Title Author Publisher Series Title Children's Books Search Children's Books Featured Children's Books RA for All: library blogs Right after ALA Annual every year there is always a big buzz in the library community. Yes, a huge number of librarians return to their work energized, sharing ideas, and making plans for future programs and services. But, there is also the business side to the annual meeting and that too can make some waves that ripple out to all librarians whether they went to the conference or not. ALA is a huge organization that is supposed to represent every single librarian. The latest in books and fiction Our privacy promise The New Yorker's Strongbox is designed to let you communicate with our writers and editors with greater anonymity and security than afforded by conventional e-mail. When you visit or use our public Strongbox server at The New Yorker and our parent company, Condé Nast, will not record your I.P. address or information about your browser, computer, or operating system, nor will we embed third-party content or deliver cookies to your browser. Strongbox servers are under the physical control of The New Yorker and Condé Nast.

The Y.A./Middle-Grade Book Awards, 2012 Edition - Jen Doll It was a year of countless great books in the categories of young adult and middle-grade fiction and nonfiction, buoyed not only by content but by that all-important publishing mark of sales. "The children’s and Y.A. category grew by more than 196 percent in August," according to an Association of American Publishers report, outpacing adult literature sales by leaps and bounds. But even prior to that news there were signs this was shaping up to be an unprecedented year of Y.A., what with growing numbers of adults reading the books (helped along by the popularity of The Hunger Games, of course) and growing numbers of people writing about that trend (including here, in this column). NPR Books' summer poll of the year focused on Y.A., identifying 100 of the greatest teen novels ever. 1.

24C3: Inside the Mac OS X Kernel Many buzzwords are associated with Mac OS X: Mach kernel, microkernel, FreeBSD kernel, C++, 64 bit, UNIX... and while all of these apply in some way, "XNU", the Mac OS X kernel is neither Mach, nor FreeBSD-based, it's not a microkernel, it's not written in C++ and it's not 64 bit - but it is UNIX... but just since recently. This talk intends to clear up the confusion by presenting details of the Mac OS X kernel architecture, its components Mach, BSD and I/O-Kit, what's so different and special about this design, and what the special strengths of it are. The talk first illustrates the history behind BSD and Mach, how NEXT combined these technologies in the 1980s, and how Apple extended them in the late 1990 after buying NEXT.

Book reviews: Find the best new books {*style:<ul>*} {*style:<li>*} {*style:<br>*}{*style:<b>*}Victoria{*style:</b>*}{*style:<br>*} by Daisy Goodwin{*style:<br>*}If you love history, you have to read this book. If you think this historical era is not your cup of tea, also try this novel. We meet a young lady who is not stucked up.... Books - ArtsBeat Blog - The New York Times This year’s Hugo Awards, given to the best in science fiction, turned into a referendum on the genre’s politics. Two blocks of conservative authors and fans, calling themselves the Sad Puppies and the Rabid Puppies, have argued that the Hugos have become a litmus test of political correctness, valuing the racial and sexual identities of authors over their storytelling skills. This year, the groups used their leverage to fill categories with their own preferred nominees. At the Hugos ceremony on Saturday night in Spokane, Wash. — part of the 73rd World Science Fiction Convention — five categories ended up not giving out an award; the finalists in those five categories were all Puppies-endorsed nominees.

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