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Microscopic Sea Creatures

Microscopic Sea Creatures
By Daily Mail Reporter Updated: 16:31 GMT, 30 September 2010 Bobbing away in the dark depths of the ocean, these tiny creatures display a unique beauty that few get to truly appreciate. And the latest publication by a scientist who studies these microscopic animals is set to become an unlikely bestseller - all thanks to the beauty of plankton. His coffee table book about the amazing life forms that live unseen in the oceans has dozens of remarkable photographs taken through a microscope. Amazing life forms: Dr Richard Kirby's passion for plankton has led to a set of marvellous pictures which feature in his book Ocean Drifters, a secret world beneath the waves like these tiny Jellyfish Hidden beauty: Stunning images of a Horseshoe worm (left) and a Moon Jellyfish The book also points out that without the miniature creatures we would have no fish, oil, gas or clouds, and the sea would lose its distinctive smell. Tiny creatures: Images of Sea Angels (left) and Acantharea

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1316550/Incredible-microscopic-sea-creatures-caught-camera.html

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Creatures of the Lembeh Strait *notcot in nature , 07:40 On visual inspiration, there is something about the overwhelming sense of calm serenity with nothing but the sound of your own bubbles and the occasional boats overhead… as you just swim about watching the most incredible and mind blowing creatures going about their daily lives all around you… so, on “vacation pictures” ~ here are some of the many (there are hundreds of photos, here’s just a selection of fun ones!) creatures i’ve been encountering diving the Lembeh Strait of Indonesia this week (hiding out at Kungkungan Bay Resort)… and besides the diving creatures, you also get a peek at the large crab i ran into, and the impressive Tuna statue in the center of Bitung (tuna capital of indonesia?)… see it all on the next page! For the whole Kungkungan Bay Resort Lembeh Strait dive-cation series - [The dramatic moon] [Wonderpus vs Mimic Octopus] [Frogfish, Nudibranchs, and more creatures!] Tags: animals - nature - ocean - travel

The Story of Charas, Malana & Parvati Valley ! In India, there has been a long recorded history of the sacramental use of the Cannabis plant popularly known as "Ganja". Even today there are many religious / spiritual sects in India who use Ganja to attain altered states of consciousness which brings them closer to their inner divinity, allowing wisdom and intuition to rise within their consciousness. A million and more Naga Babas, the Nihangs of Punjab, the Pandas of Orissa all use Cannabis in one form or another and have been doing so for many many years.

Naturally Good Magazine <A HREF="images/cover.jpg"> Heal thyself! Naturally Good Magazine is the do-it-yourself guide to maintaining health, preventing disease, nutrition, detoxification, and curing disease naturally with God's medicines. Throughout our pages, we provide you with the well-researched truth about health care, in order to help you to help yourself.

Instant Author. How To Turn What You Know Into A Book by Cathy Presland (and 1 other) So Many People Want To Write A Book And So Few Do Many of us dream of having a book. But it can seem like such a big project, or we're not sure what to write about that we don't start. Or we start and don't finish. Your Time Is Now Meet the world’s only immortal animal Email If you’re thinking McLeod, you couldn’t be further from the truth. What you have to do is think small; not microscopic, just big enough to see with your naked eye. Turritopsis nutricula is a hydrozoan, and it’s considered by scientists to be the only animal that cheated death. Solitary organisms are (according to current belief) doomed to die, after they completed their life cycle. But Hydrozoa don’t live by normal rules. Research Update:Black Sesame or Sesamum indicum L.MDidea-Extracts Professional.R067. Contents Research Update:Black Sesame or Sesamum indicum L.

The 101 Most Useful Websites on the Internet Here are some of the most useful websites on the internet that you may not know about. These web sites, well most of them, solve at least one problem really well and they all have simple web addresses (URLs) that you can memorize thus saving you a trip to Google. And if you find this list useful, also check out the expanded version – The Most Useful Websites – which now offers a collection of 150+ undiscovered and incredibly useful websites to enhance your productivity. ctrlq.org/screenshots – for capturing screenshots of web pages on mobile and desktops. dictation.io – online voice recognition in the browser itself. Changelog and Updates The following websites were part of the original list but they are either no longer available or have been replaced with better alternatives.

Todd Aki Underwater Marvels Flickr Hive Mind is a search engine as well as an experiment in the power of Folksonomies. All thumbnail images come directly from Flickr, none are stored on Flickr Hive Mind. These photos are bound by the copyright and license of their owners, the thumbnail links take to you to the photos (as well as their copyright and license details) within Flickr. The 5 Most Profitable Drugs They Never Cure You - New York News - Runn (...) In this week's cover story, writer Keegan Hamilton investigates the controversy surrounding ibogaine, the experimental hallucinogen drug that has helped kick meth and heroin addictions. Ibogaine is illegal, even though its power to cure addicts has been proven. Hamilton's story describes the many reasons the medical establishment and the government are wary of Ibogaine, despite its benefits, but one of them really stood out: Because Ibogaine is an outright cure, drug companies want nothing to do with it. Martin Kuehne, a chemist at the University of Vermont, is quoted in the story, saying, "Pharmaceutical companies don't like cures. Really, they don't -- that's the sad thing.

Is 3D printing the key to Utopia? Magic trick: a 3D printer makes a plastic rabbit. Photograph: David Neff You know the problem: the dishwasher that has cleaned your dishes faithfully for 15 years suddenly stops working. How deep is the ocean, how high am I? How deep is the ocean, how high am I. via : Ghost Room External Stimuli : Hengki Koentjoro, Flickr Stream, Chet Baker Themes : Photography Nodes : cool jazz, gelatinous, Hengki Koentjoro, jellyfish, ocean, underwater

Optogenetics: Controlling the Brain with Light [Extended Version] Despite the enormous efforts of clinicians and researchers, our limited insight into psychiatric disease (the worldwide-leading cause of years of life lost to death or disability) hinders the search for cures and contributes to stigmatization. Clearly, we need new answers in psychiatry. But as philosopher of science Karl Popper might have said, before we can find the answers, we need the power to ask new questions. In other words, we need new technology. Developing appropriate techniques is difficult, however, because the mammalian brain is beyond compare in its complexity.

Singing Fish Hums to Attract Mates It sounds like the drone of a guitar amplifier, but it's actually the amorous serenade of a fish called the plainfin midshipman. During the summer, this sonorous sea creature hums to attract females to its rocky seafloor love nest. "It sounds like a drone of bees or maybe even the chanting of monks," neurobiologist Andrew Bass, who has studied these fish extensively, told LiveScience. Tourists bask in blue glow of firefly squid 13 Apr 2006 Toyama Bay is the habitat of the world-famous glowing firefly squid, which surface in large numbers every spring in a phenomenon that has been designated a special natural monument. Peak firefly squid season means big catches for fishermen and brisk business for sightseeing boats that provide close-up views of the magical action. Early in the morning, after 3 AM, sightseeing boats depart the Namerikawa fishing port (Namerikawa is also home to the world's only museum dedicated to the firefly squid) in Toyama prefecture, making a short journey to fixed nets located about 1 to 2 km offshore.

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