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10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds

10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds
10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds by TeachThought Staff Good assessment is frequent assessment. Any assessment is designed to provide a snapshot of student understand—the more snapshots, the more complete the full picture of knowledge. On its best day, an assessment will be 100% effective, telling you exactly what a student understands. This makes a strong argument for frequent assessment, as it can be too easy to over-react and “remediate” students who may be banging against the limits of the assessment’s design rather than their own understanding. It is a huge burden (for both teachers and students) to design, write, complete, grade, and absorb the data into an instructional design sequence on a consistent basis. Simple Assessments The word “simple” here is misleading. Then, due to their brevity, they’re simple to grade–in fact, you can grade them as exit slips–which makes taking the data and informing instruction (the whole point of assessment) a much simpler process as well.

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Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) Print Version What Are CATs? Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) are generally simple, non-graded, anonymous, in-class activities designed to give you and your students useful feedback on the teaching-learning process as it is happening. Examples of CATs include the following. The Background Knowledge Probe is a short, simple questionnaire given to students at the start of a course, or before the introduction of a new unit, lesson or topic. It is designed to uncover students’ pre-conceptions.The Minute Paper tests how students are gaining knowledge, or not. Why Should I Use CATs? CATs can be used to improve the teaching and learning that occurs in a class. How Should I Use CATs? Results from CATs can guide teachers in fine-tuning their teaching strategies to better meet student needs. Where Can I Find More CATs? The standard references on CATs is Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers, 2nd edition, by Thomas A.

Digital Differentiation This is part of a Digital Differentiation model, my way i of weaving a web of flexible tools together for teaching and learning. To keep the model relevant, frequent updates are required, as new tools and trends emerge. To access the most current resources, please click on the tab at the top of this blog: Digital Differentiation - Current Updating Ten months ago I published a Digital Differentiation model on this blog. Technology is a tool that can be used to help teachers facilitate learning experiences that address the diverse learning needs of all students and help them develop 21st Century Skills, an idea supported by the Common Core. At it's most basic level, digital tools can be used to help students find, understand and use information. The goal is to design student-driven learning experiences that are fueled by standards-based Essential Questions and facilitated by digital tools to provide students with flexible learning paths. 3 Components: Essential Questions Flexible Learning Paths

3 Classroom Tools to Measure Student Learning Formative assessment is vital to teachers in any classroom environment. Teachers have been formatively assessing students for years, because we must know what our students know in order to help them understand what they do not know. Do you know what I mean?! Fortunately, many classrooms are charging into the 21st century with technology initiatives. Whether your technology program has created a 1:1 environment, a BYOD system, or you have access to only a few devices in your classroom, these three tech tools will help you engage your students while simultaneously gauging their understanding of concepts. Kahoot! Kahoot! When ready to begin the game, the teacher simply posts the game pin on the whiteboard. We've used Kahoot! Formative As its name implies, Formative, is another wonderful formative assessment tool. Teachers can assign these assessments by sending students a link or creating classrooms through a process nearly identical to that of a learning management system. Padlet

22 Easy Formative Assessment Techniques for Measuring Student Learning I came across Terry Heick’s blog – 10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds – at TeachThought from earlier this year and really enjoyed the formative assessment strategies that he outlined. Using formative assessment techniques in class – or “simple assessments” as Terry calls them – are easy to administer and provide the instant feedback teachers need to identify which students need more help, and then adjust their instruction and lesson plans to help them. Visit Terry’s blog above to get more detail on the following ten formative assessment techniques: 1. New Clothes 2. Combining Terry’s ten with the ten we’ve blogged about can give teachers 20 great formative assessment strategies for measuring student learning. 11. Here are a couple more assessments you can use to elicit evidence of student learning. 21. 22. All of these 22 formative assessment techniques are simple to administer and free or inexpensive to use. Do you have a favorite?

Make your own study game W2L Info Published on December 1st, 2013 | by What2Learn Are you looking to make your own study game? No technical skills or programming knowledge is required to make these fun and effective study games – simply fill in the blanks with your own questions and answers and your flash-based game is instantly created and available for your students to play online. If you would like to create some games in the meantime, please sign up for a great value student or teacher Premium Account. Take a look below at the fantastic games you could soon be making… Hangman-style study games Simply provide eight single word answers to make your game. Q & A quizzes Provide eight questions and answers. Anagram study games Provide eight questions and answers. Matching activities Interactive wordsearches Provide eight questions and answers. Ready to make your own study games? Click the ‘sign up’ link at the top of this page if you are ready to start creating your own study games like the ones above. Related posts:

Using Classroom Assessment Techniques-Teaching Excellence & Educational Innovation Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) are a set of specific activities that instructors can use to quickly gauge students’ comprehension. They are generally used to assess students’ understanding of material in the current course, but with minor modifications they can also be used to gauge students’ knowledge coming into a course or program. CATs are meant to provide immediate feedback about the entire class’s level of understanding, not individual students’. The instructor can use this feedback to inform instruction, such as speeding up or slowing the pace of a lecture or explicitly addressing areas of confusion. Asking Appropriate Questions in CATs Examples of appropriate questions you can ask in the CAT format: How familiar are students with important names, events, and places in history that they will need to know as background in order to understand the lectures and readings (e.g. in anthropology, literature, political science)? Using Specific Types of CATs Minute Paper Muddiest Point

Differentiation Is... So, how would you define differentiated instruction? In her newly revised book, The Differentiated Classroom: Responding to the Needs of All Learners, 2nd Edition, Carol Ann Tomlinson discusses the meaning of differentiation and how teachers can modify their instruction to engage all students. The book highlights key principles of differentiation, including: An invitational learning environment that encourages and supports learningQuality curriculumAssessment that informs teaching and learningInstruction that responds to student variance Take a look at the infographic below that highlights some of the best and worst practices for differentiation in today’s classrooms. Want to read more?

Free Resources and Tools for "Authentic" Assessment The key to innovations in assessment and curriculum planning are trust, transparency, and collaboration -- and providing the professional development and training teachers need to succeed. Credit: Tom LeGoff Note: The School of the Future is part of a network of New York schools that develops and uses its own assessment techniques, referred to as DYOs. The school also uses Tasks on Demand, or unannounced assessments that do not provide supports for the students, in order to measure their learning at regular intervals. Resources On This Page: Do Your Own (DYO) Assessment Examples, Rubrics, Data, and Data Analysis Examples of criteria used in authentic assessment Back to Top Skills Spirals and Tracking Sheets Ideas for moving curriculum into a circular pattern and tracking performance to expose students to a wide variety of topics over and over again as the material gets more challenging SOF's Instuctional Tools for Teachers Tools for Developing a High School Humanities Project -- Persepolis

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