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100 Search Engines For Academic Research

100 Search Engines For Academic Research
Back in 2010, we shared with you 100 awesome search engines and research resources in our post: 100 Time-Saving Search Engines for Serious Scholars. It’s been an incredible resource, but now, it’s time for an update. Some services have moved on, others have been created, and we’ve found some new discoveries, too. Many of our original 100 are still going strong, but we’ve updated where necessary and added some of our new favorites, too. Check out our new, up-to-date collection to discover the very best search engine for finding the academic results you’re looking for. General Need to get started with a more broad search? iSEEK Education:iSeek is an excellent targeted search engine, designed especially for students, teachers, administrators, and caregivers. Meta Search Want the best of everything? Dogpile:Find the best of all the major search engines with Dogpile, an engine that returns results from Google, Yahoo! Databases and Archives Books & Journals Science Math & Technology Social Science

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List of academic databases and search engines - Wikipedia Wikipedia list article This page contains a representative list of notable databases and search engines useful in an academic setting for finding and accessing articles in academic journals, institutional repositories, archives, or other collections of scientific and other articles. Databases and search engines differ substantially in terms of coverage and retrieval qualities.[1] Users need to account for qualities and limitations of databases and search engines, especially those searching systematically for records such as in systematic reviews or meta-analyses.[2] As the distinction between a database and a search engine is unclear for these complex document retrieval systems, see:

ICanHazPDF #ICanHazPDF is a hashtag used on Twitter to request access to academic journal articles which are behind paywalls.[1] It began in 2011[2] by scientist Andrea Kuszewski.[3][4] The name is derived from the meme I Can Has Cheezburger?.[4] Process[edit] Users request articles by tweeting an article's title, DOI or other linked information like a publisher's link,[5] their email address, and the hashtag "#ICanHazPDF". Someone who has access to the article will then email it to them. The user then deletes the original tweet.[6] Alternately, users who do not wish to post their email address in the clear can use direct messaging to exchange contact information with a volunteer who has offered to share the article of interest. Home Simplify your research! Plan your research project with the help of SAGE Research Methods. With SAGE Research Methods, faculty, students, and researchers can: Learn how to design a research project Discover new methods to use in your research with the Methods Map Read over 175,000 pages of SAGE's renowed research methods content from leading global authors Browse content from over 720 books, dictionaries, encyclopedias, and handbooks Share content with colleagues and research partners using Methods Lists Explore related online journal content with the SAGE Journals widget Watch a video that answers key questions about research methods Click here to recommend SAGE Research Methods to your library. Watch a video tutorial to learn more about how to use the tools on SAGE Research Methods in your research.

Deep Web Search - A How-To Site Where to start a deep web search is easy. You hit Google.com and when you brick wall it, you go to scholar.google.com which is the academic database of Google. After you brick wall there, your true deep web search begins. You need to know something about your topic in order to choose the next tool. To be fair, some of these sites have improved their index-ability with Google and are now technically no longer Deep Web, rather kind-of-deep-web. However, there are only a few that have done so.

nodemailer Send e-mails from Node.js – easy as cake! Upgrade warning Do not upgrade Nodemailer from 0.7 or lower to 1.0 as there are breaking changes. 16 cool things you can do on the Internet for free The Beatles sang it and countless philosophers have claimed it, the best things in life are free. But is it really the case? Well, if you’re hanging out on the Internet, the answer is a resounding “yes”. To see why, check out the sixteen fantastic free things you can do online down below. If all of this online awesomeness has you feeling a bit nostalgic for the old days of the Internet, take a trip back in time and check out 14 websites from the 1990s that are somehow still around. 1.

Quora - Wikipedia Question-and-answer platform The company was founded in June 2009, and the website was made available to the public on June 21, 2010.[6] Users can collaborate by editing questions and suggesting edits to answers that have been submitted by other users.[7] In 2020, the website was visited by 300 million unique people a month.[8] NetLogo Home Page NetLogo is a multi-agent programmable modeling environment. It is used by tens of thousands of students, teachers and researchers worldwide. It also powers HubNet participatory simulations. It is authored by Uri Wilensky and developed at the CCL. You can download it free of charge.

Teaching Information Literacy Now Last week, a new study from Stanford University revealed that many students are inept at discerning fact from opinion when reading articles online. The report, combined with the spike in fake and misleading news during the 2016 election, has school librarians, including me, rethinking how we teach evaluation of online sources to our students. How can we educate our students to evaluate the information they find online when so many adults are sharing inaccurate articles on social media? While social media isn’t the only reason for the surge in fake news over the last 10 years, it’s certainly making it harder for information consumers of every age to sort through fact and fiction. mailgun-js Simple Node.js module for Mailgun. Installation npm install mailgun-js

Fun and Interesting Conversions Fun and Interesting Conversions <blockquote><p><span><b>You do not have JavaScript enabled.</b></span><br /><span>The conversions on this site require the use of JavaScript so please enable before continuing. For assistance in enabling JavaScript, please contact the webmaster.</span></p></blockquote> International Friends If you chat or post with friends from different countries, you might find this useful.

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