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Centre Pompidou : Mon œil

https://www.centrepompidou.fr/cpv/theme/mon-oeil

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How to make a Snowman Banner This is a cute project I'm doing with Kindergarten right now. Snowman Banners. Here in Calgary we just received a good dump of snow and now it's warming up (above 0 degrees celsius).....perfect snowman weather! We wanted a cute and easy project that incorporated textiles. MATERIALS REQUIRED:- fabric or burlap - sewing machine or glue gun (adult use only)- white felt/material- masking tape- sponges or foam- white acrylic paint- wax paper- tacky glue- black felt- red felt or fleece- 2 black buttons- 3 assorted buttons- small scrap of orange material- black dimensional fabric paint- brown yarn- fabric snowflakes- dowel, stick, bamboo garden stake- yarnPROCEDURE: Take an art board or piece of cardboard and tape on some wax paper.

Smithsonian Digitizes & Lets You Download 40,000 Works of Asian and American Art Art lovers who visit my hometown of Washington, DC have an almost embarrassing wealth of opportunities to view art collections classical, Baroque, Renaissance, modern, postmodern, and otherwise through the Smithsonian’s network of museums. From the East and West Wings of the National Gallery, to the Hirshhorn, with its wondrous sculpture garden, to the American Art Museum and Renwick Gallery---I’ll admit, it can be a little overwhelming, and far too much to take in during a weekend jaunt, especially if you’ve got restless family in tow. (One can’t, after all, miss the Natural History or Air and Space Museums… or, you know… those monuments.) In all the bustle of a DC vacation, however, one collection tends to get overlooked, and it is one of my personal favorites—the Freer and Sackler Galleries, which house the Smithsonian’s unique collection of Asian art, including the James McNeill Whistler-decorated Peacock Room. (See his “Harmony in Blue and Gold” above.) via Kottke

Guggenheim Museum : Téléchargement gratuit de livres d'art the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by Kandinsky, Wassily, 1866-1944; Dearstyne, Howard, tr; Rebay, Hilla, 1890-1967, ed texts eye Fine Prints: Japanese, pre-1915   The Library's Prints and Photographs Division houses more than 2,500 woodblock prints and drawings by Japanese artists of the seventeenth through early twentieth centuries including Hiroshige, Kuniyoshi, Sadahide, and Yoshiiku. The Library of Congress appreciates the financial support provided by Nicihibunken (International Research Center for Japanese Studies, an Inter-University Research Institute Corporation) to scan 1,100 of the Ukiyo-e prints. Subjects frequently depicted in the prints include: actors [view examples] women [view examples] landscapes [ view examples] scenes from Japanese literature [view examples] daily life [view examples] views of Western foreigners [view examples]. The Library acquired its Japanese woodblock print holdings from a host of different donors and collectors including Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, President William Howard Taft, Crosby Stuart Noyes, and Emily Crane Chadbourne.

Learn to Draw Tutorials for Kids Print and enjoy our Learn to Draw Animals pages for kids of all ages. Kids can use our step by step... Here's a collection of our "learn to draw" activities for Spring. Children can follow... Kids can have fun with these printables with which they can learn to draw Autumn pictures such as... Kids can have fun with our learn to draw tutorials for winter pictures - a pretty snowflake and a...

Open Content Program (The Getty) The Getty makes available, without charge, all available digital images to which the Getty holds the rights or that are in the public domain to be used for any purpose. No permission is required. For additional information please see the related press releases, as well as overviews of each phase of the program on The Getty Iris. Vidéos du Museum of Modern Art (MoMA à New York) “It would not be a commonplace portrait at all, but a carefully composed picture, with very carefully arranged colors and lines. A rhythmic and angular pose. A decorative Félix, entering with his hat or a flower in his hand.” With these words, in 1890, Paul Signac described to Félix Fénéon the extraordinary portrait he was dedicating to him. In it, Signac paid homage to Fénéon’s distinctive appearance, his generous but enigmatic personality, and his innovative approach to modernism.

MoMA The Museum of Modern Art, New York, United States Founded in 1929, The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in midtown Manhattan was the first museum devoted to the modern era. Today MoMA’s rich and varied collection offers a panoramic overview of modern and contemporary art, from the innovative European painting and sculpture of the 1880s to today's film, design, and performance art. From an initial gift of eight prints and one drawing, the collection has grown to include over 150,000 paintings, sculptures, drawings, prints, photographs, architectural models and drawings, and design objects; approximately 22,000 films and four million film stills; and, in its Library and Archives, over 300,000 books, artist books, and periodicals, and extensive individual files on more than 70,000 artists. Collection highlights include Claude Monet’s Water Lilies, Vincent van Gogh’s The Starry Night, and Pablo Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, along with more recent works by Andy Warhol, Elizabeth Murray, Cindy Sherman, and many others.

Feather Wings Mural The past few months my students have been making feathers for a group mural. This idea was inspired by my friend and celebrity in the art community, Cassie Stephens! Head on over to her blog and check out her magical art teacher'n treasures at Cassie Stephen's Blog!! Her original inspo was international street artist, Kelsey Montague. Her inspiring murals challenge people to ask the question "What Lifts you" "What makes your heart Soar?" World Digital Library Home No other symphonic composition has met with such a broad and complex reception as Ludwig van Beethoven's Symphony Number 9 in D minor, opus 125, popularly known as the Choral Symphony. The work marked an important development in 19th century music. In the finale, Beethoven set to music the German poet Friedrich von Schiller’s An die Freude (Ode to joy), the first time the human voice was included in a symphonic work. The symphony was first performed in Vienna on May 7, 1824.

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