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The Handmaid's Tale (wiki)

The Handmaid's Tale (wiki)
The Handmaid's Tale won the 1985 Governor General's Award and the first Arthur C. Clarke Award in 1987; it was also nominated for the 1986 Nebula Award, the 1986 Booker Prize, and the 1987 Prometheus Award. It has been adapted for the cinema, radio, opera, and stage. Plot summary[edit] The Handmaid's Tale is set in the near future in the Republic of Gilead, a theocratic military dictatorship formed within the borders of what was formerly the United States of America. Beginning with a staged terrorist attack (blamed on Islamic extremist terrorists) that kills the President and most of Congress, a movement calling itself the "Sons of Jacob" launches a revolution and suspends the United States Constitution under the pretext of restoring order. The story is presented from the point of view of a woman called Offred (literally Of-Fred). The Commander is a high-ranking official in Gilead. After Offred's initial meeting with Nick, they begin to rendezvous more frequently. Characters[edit] Related:  Utopian literatureséquence utopia docs

The Handmaid s Tale (etext) A chair, a table, a lamp. Above, on the white ceiling, a relief ornament in the shape of a wreath, and in the center of it a blank space, plastered over, like the place in a face where the eye has been taken out. There must have been a chandelier, once. They've removed anything you could tie a rope to. A window, two white curtains. Under the window, a window seat with a little cushion. On the wall above the chair, a picture, framed but with no glass: a print of flowers, blue irises, watercolor. Think of it as being in the army, said Aunt Lydia. A bed. So. But a chair, sunlight, flowers: these are not to be dismissed. The bell that measures time is ringing. I get up out of the chair, advance my feet into the sunlight, in their red shoes, flat-heeled to save the spine and not for dancing. The door of the room-not my room, I refuse to say my-is not locked. There remains a mirror, on the hall wall. Sometimes I listen outside closed doors, a thing I never would have done in the time before.

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (etext) Chapter One A SQUAT grey building of only thirty-four stories. Over the main entrance the words, CENTRAL LONDON HATCHERY AND CONDITIONING CENTRE, and, in a shield, the World State's motto, COMMUNITY, IDENTITY, STABILITY. The enormous room on the ground floor faced towards the north. "And this," said the Director opening the door, "is the Fertilizing Room." Bent over their instruments, three hundred Fertilizers were plunged, as the Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning entered the room, in the scarcely breathing silence, the absent-minded, soliloquizing hum or whistle, of absorbed concentration. "Just to give you a general idea," he would explain to them. "To-morrow," he would add, smiling at them with a slightly menacing geniality, "you'll be settling down to serious work. Meanwhile, it was a privilege. Tall and rather thin but upright, the Director advanced into the room. "Bokanovsky's Process," repeated the Director, and the students underlined the words in their little notebooks. Mr.

Shakespeare's Sonnets Nineteen Eighty-Four History and title[edit] A 1947 draft manuscript of the first page of Nineteen Eighty-Four, showing the editorial development. The Last Man in Europe was an early title for the novel but in a letter dated 22 October 1948 to his publisher Fredric Warburg, eight months before publication, Orwell wrote about hesitating between The Last Man in Europe and Nineteen Eighty-Four.[14] Warburg suggested changing the main title to a more commercial one.[15] Copyright status[edit] The novel will be in the public domain in the European Union and Russia in 2021 and in the United States in 2044.[21] It is already in the public domain in Canada;[22] South Africa,[23] Argentina[24] Australia,[25] and Oman.[26] Background[edit] The banner of the Party in the 1984 film adaptation of the book (I) the upper-class Inner Party, the elite ruling minority, who make up 2% of the population. As the government, the Party controls the population with four ministries: Plot[edit] Characters[edit] Principal characters[edit]

Nineteen Eighty-four, by George Orwell : chapter1.1 It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen. Winston Smith, his chin nuzzled into his breast in an effort to escape the vile wind, slipped quickly through the glass doors of Victory Mansions, though not quickly enough to prevent a swirl of gritty dust from entering along with him. The hallway smelt of boiled cabbage and old rag mats. At one end of it a coloured poster, too large for indoor display, had been tacked to the wall. It depicted simply an enormous face, more than a metre wide: the face of a man of about forty-five, with a heavy black moustache and ruggedly handsome features. Inside the flat a fruity voice was reading out a list of figures which had something to do with the production of pig-iron. Outside, even through the shut window-pane, the world looked cold. Behind Winston’s back the voice from the telescreen was still babbling away about pig-iron and the overfulfilment of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Winston turned round abruptly. He sat back.

Orwell's 1984 (etext) Nineteen Eighty-four, by George Orwell Table of Contents Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Chapter 9 Chapter 10 Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Appendix. The Principles of Newspeak Front Table of Contents Next Académie d'Orléans-Tours | Anglais Orléans-Tours : 2nde: séquences et ressources Les contextes d’usage de la langue étudiée sont prioritairement dictés par l’entrée culturelle « l’art de vivre ensemble » (famille, communautés, villes, territoires). Cette entrée s’organise autour de trois notions liées au présent, au passé et à l’avenir : - mémoire : héritages et ruptures - sentiment d’appartenance : singularités et solidarités - visions d’avenir : créations et adaptations. Il convient de décliner ces notions en problématiques inhérentes aux spécificités des aires culturelles et linguistiques étudiées.(…) L’enrichissement culturel : La réflexion sur la société ou les sociétés dont on étudie la langue constitue un objectif puissamment mobilisateur et éducatif. Les supports sont des documents authentiques de toute nature (textuels, iconographiques, audio, vidéo, etc.) qui peuvent s’inscrire dans des champs disciplinaires variés (littérature, arts, histoire, géographie, politique, sociologie, économie, sciences, etc.).

Brave New World (wiki) Classic 1932 science fiction novel by Aldous Huxley In 1999, the Modern Library ranked Brave New World as #5 on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.[2] In 2003, Robert McCrum, writing for The Observer, included Brave New World chronologically at #53 in "the top 100 greatest novels of all time",[3] and the novel was listed at #87 on The Big Read survey by the BBC.[4] Title[edit] O wonder!How many goodly creatures are there here! Translations of the title often allude to similar expressions used in domestic works of literature: the French edition of the work is entitled Le Meilleur des mondes (The Best of All Worlds), an allusion to an expression used by the philosopher Gottfried Leibniz[7] and satirised in Candide, Ou l'Optimisme by Voltaire (1759). History[edit] Huxley said that Brave New World was inspired by the utopian novels of H. Plot[edit] Characters[edit] Bernard Marx, a sleep-learning specialist at the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre.

glogin?URI= Overview | How does George Orwell’s vision of technology and its uses in “1984” compare with today’s reality? How have concerns about privacy and freedom expressed in the novel been manifested in the contemporary world? In this lesson, students compare and contrast the world, people and technologies of “1984” with those of today and create a treatment for a modern film, print or stage adaptation that revolves around current technologies. Materials | Full text of “1984,” computers with Internet access, software for podcasting and projection equipment, copies of the handout “1984” vs. Today (PDF), video cameras and film-editing software (optional) Warm-Up | Give students the following list of words from “1984”: Big BrotherdoublethinkthoughtcrimeNewspeakmemory holeOrwellian Students who have read the novel will recognize their provenance and should define them, as well as give a contemporary example of something that could be described similarly. What does Mr. Related resources: Technology 3.

20th Century Dystopias 4 Sequence – Big Brother is Watching You | Have Fun Learning English In this chapter we will be looking at the surveillance society we live in and the consequences it has on our privacy and personal freedom. Take a look at all of these images, what do they have in common? How does the internet affect your life? How often do you use the internet? Do you have a Facebook account? How is all of the information you post on the internet being used by others? Is your personal information being sold or spied on? Read about George Orwell: What do you know about the Book 1984? An Orwellian Society? What is CCTV? CCTV in schools? What do you think? Like this: Like Loading...

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