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How to Use Game Mechanics to Reward Your Customers

How to Use Game Mechanics to Reward Your Customers
There's a green card. Then there's silver, gold, and platinum. And then there's the Centurion—the black American Express card. Which do you want in your wallet? A handful of luxury brands have for decades used promises of status to encourage customers to spend more through loyalty to their brands. Today, brands of all stripes are experimenting with the psychology of status and power in rewarding customers. Consider Foursquare, a company built entirely on a game-design model. The new rewards ecosystem is a marketer's dream. "Historically, customer engagement was something big brands did a lot better due to full scale loyalty programs," says Gabe Zichermann, a blogger who authored Game-Based Marketing and who hosts of the Gamification Summit. That's changing. Rewarding Customers Through Gamification: Why Game Mechanics? People are hard-wired to enjoy positive reinforcement. "Foursquare was a really great early example of this happening," McGonigal says.

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Related:  Game-based learning/Gamification resources

How to Use Gamification to Reward Customers and Engage Prospects Everyone wants new business. But sometimes we get so wrapped up in trying to predict what the next great lead-gen tactic will be, we forget that new business doesn't come just from new customers. It also comes from your current customers, and it's a lot cheaper to acquire, to boot. Most marketers have undoubtedly seen the Bain & Company study that put hard numbers to the new-versus-existing-customer conundrum: it's six to seven times more expensive to gain a new customer than it is to retain an existing one, and a 5% increase in customer retention can boost profit from 25%-95%. You can always try to make your customers happier by sending them free goodies, responding to emails quicker, and smiling more when you see them, but odds are that any gains you'll see aren't going to move the needle much.

The 50 Best Videos For Teachers Interested In Gamification Image by Sezzles via Flickr Creative Commons Gaming in education is a really big deal, and a very fun way to get students more involved and interested in education. Board games, video games, even active outdoor games all have an important place in education, and these videos share more about their role in learning. Check out our list of 50 awesome videos for gaming teachers to discover what experts, teachers, and even students have to say about using games for education. Gabe Zichermann: How games make kids smarter : Check out Gabe Zichermann’s TED talk to find out how video games can actually make kids smarter and better problem solvers.

SCVNGR's Secret Game Mechanics Playdeck Some companies keep a playbook of product tips, tricks and trade secrets. Zynga has an internal playbook, for instance, that is a collection of “concepts, techniques, know-how and best practices for developing successful and distinctive social games”. Zynga’s playbook has entered the realm of legend and was even the subject of a lawsuit. Paper Towel Problem Solved I had a problem. In my classroom bathroom (my room used to be a preschool classroom), I would find tons of paper towel trash all over the floor whenever students washed their hands after a messy project. I tried just remind them to get their paper towel in the trash can and telling them we shouldn't make our awesome custodians' jobs harder and none of it worked. I printed a really simple sign (shown above) that says:

Why the Gamification of Learning Became so Successful Who could have predicted that the gamification of learning could have yielded such continued success, for students of all ages? If twenty or so years ago you were to tell an educator that the future of learning exists in digital gaming, you’d probably be laughed at. Not too long ago games were viewed almost universally as a deterrent to education—the word “videogame” had nothing but the most negative connotation to many parents and educators. Games weren’t viewed as sources of learning, but ones of distraction. Of course that has all changed in recent years. What is Gamification and Why Should You Care? This is a community post, untouched by our editors. PREVIOUS: How To Bring An Event To Life With Augmented Reality When you think of gamification, what do you think of? Playing games?

101 Game Design Principles for Social Media Game design principles are often incorporated into social media (gamification). The reason is that games are downright addictive. Game-like features can increase user engagement — encouraging desired behaviour from customers, partners and employees. Game design is a well developed field. After all, games have been around for thousands of years. The following 101 game design elements are commonly incorporated into social media and software (usually in small amounts). design principles Defeating an enemy; overcoming an obstacle; surviving in the face of adversity: success and failure are at the very core of the game-player's experience. Games offer players a number of choices, some of which lead to success and some of which lead to failure or non-success. Together with the challenges presented to the player, the fact that the player might fail lends significance to the player's choices and actions.

8 Research Findings Supporting the Benefits of Gamification in Education On Sunday, Tess Pajaron sent me a great article from Open Colleges about “The Virtues of Daydreaming And 30 Other Surprising (And Controversial) Research Findings About How Students Learn”. One thing that really struck me about this article is how many of these findings indicated benefits that can come from the use of gaming in education. Some of the findings directly addressed the subject, while others were indirectly indicative of potential positive outcomes of gaming in an instructional context. Of course, the “gamification” of education generally refers to the idea of incorporating gaming elements in instruction and instructional tools, such as the use of digital badges in an online learning application.

mint.com – Gamification in Personal Finance « interaction design Posted by reto wettach in gamification, service design. trackback Those of you, who read this blog, know that I am currently interested in gamification and in banking (amongst a lot of other things… :-) ) In his Google Tech Talk, the researcher and designer Sebastian Deterding mentions mint.com, basically an online banking software, which “pulls all your financial accounts into one place” – for free, which is kind of scary…

The ten rules of gamification Gamification may have been the buzzword of 2010, but its influence shows no sign of abating in 2011. It is a term derided by game designers, misunderstood by brands and unknown to consumers. So as you set out to “gamify” your business, what are the cardinal rules of gamification?

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