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MQTT: MQ Telemetry Transport

Internet of Things The Internet of Things (IoT) is the network of physical objects or "things" embedded with electronics, software, sensors and connectivity to enable it to achieve greater value and service by exchanging data with the manufacturer, operator and/or other connected devices. Each thing is uniquely identifiable through its embedded computing system but is able to interoperate within the existing Internet infrastructure. The term “Internet of Things” was first documented by a British visionary, Kevin Ashton, in 1999.[1] Typically, IoT is expected to offer advanced connectivity of devices, systems, and services that goes beyond machine-to-machine communications (M2M) and covers a variety of protocols, domains, and applications.[2] The interconnection of these embedded devices (including smart objects), is expected to usher in automation in nearly all fields, while also enabling advanced applications like a Smart Grid.[3] Early history[edit] In its original interpretation,[when?] Media[edit]

Mother • Sen.se - Cisco Firefox What do you care about today? Apps to help you feel better, gain peace of mind, know yourself and your environment, make life easier. Sense Mother will know how to help you in more and more areas of your daily life. Select the App that meets your current needs and concerns. Sense Mother and her Motion Cookies will seamlessly adapt. WalkAre you active enough to stay fit? FridgeGet notified if the fridge door is left open and it gets warmer. Contiki: The Open Source Operating System for the Internet of Things

6LoWPAN Auto-ID Labs: Auto-ID Labs IPSO Alliance | Enabling the Internet of Things Weightless SIG for M2M and Internet of Things IOT Breakout Tracking the Internet of Things: Postscapes IEC 18000-7:2009 - Information technology -- Radio frequency identification for item management -- Part 7: Parameters for active air interface communications at 433 MHz Abstract ISO/IEC 18000-7:2009 defines the air interface for radio frequency identification (RFID) devices operating as an active RF tag in the 433 MHz band used in item management applications. It provides a common technical specification for RFID devices that can be used by ISO technical committees developing RFID application standards. ISO/IEC 18000-7:2009 is intended to allow for compatibility and to encourage inter-operability of products for the growing RFID market in the international marketplace. ISO/IEC 18000-7:2009 defines the forward and return link parameters for technical attributes including, but not limited to, operating frequency, operating channel accuracy, occupied channel bandwidth, maximum power, spurious emissions, modulation, duty cycle, data coding, bit rate, bit rate accuracy, bit transmission order, and, where appropriate, operating channels, frequency hop rate, hop sequence, spreading sequence, and chip rate.

Funnel Nimbits Data Distribution Service (DDS) Imagine a world where cars are able to navigate safely to their destinations and find parking without a driver; where patient monitoring systems are smartly integrated to provide error-free alerts and doctors are able to keep track of homebound patients’ health. This world is no longer a vision of some distant future or a science fiction movie. Every day more and more devices are becoming connected allowing smart machines and systems to perform functions that were not possible before. This convergence of machine and intelligent data is the Industrial Internet (alternatively known as the Internet of Things or machine-to-machine/M2M communications). OMG’s Data Distribution Service (DDS) standard is a protocol for the Industrial Internet. It enables network interoperability for connected machines, enterprise systems and mobile devices.

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