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Dubai Architecture-

Dubai Architecture-
The Burj al Alam, or The World Tower. Upon completion it will rank as the world's highest hotel. It is expected to be finished by 2009. At 480 meters it will only be 28 meters shorter than the Taipei 101. The Trump International Hotel & Tower, which will be the centerpiece of one of the palm islands, The Palm Jumeirah. Dubailand. Dubailand will be built on 3 billion square feet (107 miles^2) at an estimated $20 billion price tag. Dubai Sports City. Currently, the Walt Disney World Resort is the #1 tourist destination in the world. The Dubai Marina is an entirely man made development that will contain over 200 highrise buildings when finished. The Dubai Mall will be the largest shopping mall in the world with over 9 million square feet of shopping and around 1000 stores. Ski Dubai, which is already open, is the largest indoor skiing facility in the world. The UAE Spaceport would be the first spaceport in the world if construction ever gets under way. Some other other crazy shit... Related:  Dubai

The Best Couch Ideas For Your Home This collection will help you to find the best couch for your home. Tilt Scanner : Erik Askin Erik Askin © 2012 Erik Askin Built with Indexhibit List of tallest buildings in Dubai Skyline of Dubai before sunset Overall, Dubai has 18 completed and topped-out buildings that rise at least 300 metres (984 ft) in height, which is more than any other city in the world.[4] While Dubai has 73 completed and topped-out buildings that rise at least 200 metres (656 ft) in height, again which is more than any other city in the world. Based on the average height of the ten tallest completed buildings, Dubai has the tallest skyline in the Middle East and the world.[5] As of 2012[update], the skyline of Dubai is ranked fifth in the world with 236 buildings rising at least 100 metres (330 ft) in height.[6] The history of skyscrapers in Dubai began with the construction of Dubai World Trade Centre in 1979, which is usually regarded as the first high-rise in the city. Tallest buildings[edit] Burj Khalifa is the tallest building in the world JW Marriott Marquis Dubai, is the tallest hotel in the world Burj Al Arab Cayan Tower Emirates Towers Under construction[edit] On-hold[edit] General

After The Meltdown: Where Does Architecture Go From Here? By Vanessa Quirk (click here for original article) © Megan Jett You can get into Architecture for one of two reasons: good architecture or bad. For Cameron Sinclair, the co-founder of Architecture for Humanity, it was the latter. As a kid, Sinclair would wander his rough-and-tumble South London neighborhood, contemplating how it could be improved (and creating elaborate Lego models to that effect). But that’s not Architecture. Architecture Schools have created curriculums based on a profession that, by and large, doesn’t exist. Unfortunately, however, the Recession has made perfectly clear that there isn’t much need for Guggenheims – certainly not as many as there are architects. So what needs to change? We’ve been trained to think, to envision and design. 2010 Yale Building Project. The Powder-keg in the Academy The effect of the First-year Building Project on Yale students was one of empowerment. But, after the revolutionary spirit of the ‘60s passed, the spark somewhat subsided. 1993.

Is This Hidden Architectural Gem Another &Blade Runner& Building? Each day, thousands of people walk by 5 Beekman, a pretty yet unassuming building in Lower Manhattan, never guessing what could be found within. Scouting New York, a blog written by a location scout that's a must-read for local history freaks, got invited inside for an incredible peek at an architectural gem that's hidden in plain sight. As you enter the building it's nothing special, says Scouting NY. "And then you look up…" For nine stories, the ornate cast-iron railings twirl up and up through a light-filled atrium. The ninth floor is ringed with arched windows and topped with a gorgeous glassed-in skylight, with some pretty remarkable views of the neighboring skyscrapers. The atrium, and this entire portion of the building, has been boarded up since 1940 due to fire code violations. The use of brick, wood, wrought iron, and glass bears an uncanny resemblance to one of Los Angeles's most beautiful structures, the Bradbury Building (above). [Scouting NY]

For The Love of Wood Wood is both universal and unique. No other material is as deeply embedded in the history, culture and life of humans worldwide as wood, yet every single piece of wood is unique. The color tone, texture, durability, flexibility and even sound qualities of different tree species have puzzled and challenged artists, architects, designers, builders and artisans for thousands of years. Still today, nothing matches wood in versatility or beauty, so it is great to see how today’s designers and architects continue to face the challenge of wood, and use it creatively to interpret sleek, modern designs. They use wood to meet their current needs and desires for which wood is ideally suited. People also look for sustainable alternatives, eco-friendly options, greener solutions. We especially love the influence of Scandinavian and Japanese traditions that we can detect in today’s wood architecture and design. Scandinavian building and design traditions are based solidly on the use of wood.

Climate-Friendly Sunken Pool Converts into Radiant Floor Here’s a truly glamorous idea for a pool. A sinking pool! The apparently permanent stone floor in this room literally slowly drops to reveal the pool underneath. In the raised position, you can walk on the same surface radiantly warmed from beneath. Once it is sunken it looks like any other indoor pool – as permanent as you could possibly want. You could design this so that it remains as just a shallow decorative pool when not in use, one that is only an inch or two deep. But the best thing about this idea is that it would also make keeping the pool warm a cinch. Radiant floors or the use of thermal mass is climate-friendly design because of the slow release of warmth – reducing energy needs for heating. The super-rich with luxury housing do the most harm to the planet with their luxury high energy use architecture. But of course the energy consumption would depend on how much energy is expended to raise and lower the floor.

Dubai | Buildings The city of Dubai is the main population center of the Emirate of Dubai, one of seven which joined to form the United Arab Emirates in 1972. Ruled since 1833 by the Al-Maktoum Dynasty, Dubai is located on a sheltered harbor and was already one of the principal ports on the Persian Gulf by the 1870s. In 1903 it became a major British port of call, and the city remained as a protectorate of Great Britain until the Trucial States were declared independent in 1971. Dubai was originally a small fishing town, and became prosperous through an economy based on pearls and international sea trade. By the beginning of the 20th century the city was famous for having one of the largest souks (markets) in Arabia. In 1966 the discovery of oil in the region brought a new era of prosperity to Dubai. Today the city of Dubai is one of the wealthiest and most modern anywhere, boasting the highest skyline in the Middle East including the two of the tallest hotels in the world.

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