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Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)

Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)
The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF®) The goal of the IETF is to make the Internet work better. The mission of the IETF is to make the Internet work better by producing high quality, relevant technical documents that influence the way people design, use, and manage the Internet. Newcomers to the IETF should start here. The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is an organized activity of the Internet Society (ISOC). ISOC is a non-profit organization founded in 1992 to provide leadership in Internet-related standards, education, and policy.

http://www.ietf.org/

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Group Thinks Anonymity Should Be Baked Into the Internet Itself The Internet’s main engineers have asked the architects of Tor—networking software designed to make Web browsing private—to consider turning the technology into an Internet standard. If widely adopted, such a standard would make it easy to include the technology in consumer and business products ranging from routers to apps. This would, in turn, allow far more people to browse the Web without being identified by anyone who might be spying on Internet traffic. If the discussions bear fruit, it could lead to the second major initiative of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) in response to the mass surveillance by the National Security Administration. Already the IETF is working to encrypt more of the data that flows between your computer and the websites you visit (see “Engineers Plan a Fully Encrypted Internet”). Collaborating with Tor would add an additional layer of security and privacy.

Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) CoRE Working Group Z. Shelby Internet-Draft Sensinode Intended status: Standards Track K. Hartke Expires: December 30, 2013 C. Bormann Universitaet Bremen TZI June 28, 2013 Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) draft-ietf-core-coap-18 Abstract The Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) is a specialized web transfer protocol for use with constrained nodes and constrained (e.g., low-power, lossy) networks.

10 free ways to keep track of changes to any website, without an RSS reader Do you need to know about a new product release the minute it happens? Are you watching Amazon price changes like a hawk? Is your F5 key worn out from overuse? You might want to look into some automatic ways to monitor website changes. I know RSS is the trendy way to keep up with new posts on websites -- I use it all the time -- but some sites don't offer RSS feeds, and some people either don't know how to use RSS or don't like it. That's where site monitoring services come in.

Synaptic Web Stay updated about the Synaptic Web on Twitter via @SynapticWeb The Synaptic Web By Khris Loux, Eric Blantz, Chris Saad and you... The Internet is constantly evolving. Formulas for fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory royalty determination Salant, David J (2007): Formulas for fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory royalty determination. Forthcoming in: This paper takes an axiomatic approach to determining “Fair, Reasonable, and Non-Discriminatory” (“FRAND”) royalties for intellectual property (“IP”) rights. Drawing on the extensive game theory literature on “surplus sharing/cost sharing” problems, I describe specific formulas for determining license fees that can be derived from basic fairness principles. In particular, I describe the Shapley Value, the Proportional Sharing Rule and the Nucleolus.

Web Service Architecture A Web service is a method of communications between two electronic devices over a network. It is a software function provided at a network address over the web with the service always on as in the concept of utility computing. The W3C defines a Web service as: a software system designed to support interoperable machine-to-machine interaction over a network. It has an interface described in a machine-processable format (specifically WSDL). How to Make Google Translate Beatbox Not sure if this falls in the category of Easter Egg or clever manipulation, but either way, there go our afternoons: Redditor harrichr has devised a scheme for turning Google Translate into a makeshift beatbox machine. 1) Go to [1] Google Translate2) Set the translator to translate German to German3) Copy + paste the following into the translate box: pv zk pv pv zk pv zk kz zk pv pv pv zk pv zk zk pzk pzk pvzkpkzvpvzk kkkkkk bsch4) Click “listen”5) Be amazed :) For the lazy, just click this link and it’ll be done for you. There’s nothing magical about this particular sequence, and there’s tons of room for experimentation: In German, anyway, “pv” and “zk” make complementary breathy sounds and clicks, respectively. Spaces add pauses. No idea why “bsch” makes that parrot-chirpy sound, but there you go.

File-Sharers Await Official Recognition of New Religion A group of self-confessed radical pirates are pinning their hopes on gaining official recognition of their own unique belief system. The founders of the Missionary Church of Kopimism - who hold CTRL+C and CTRL+V as sacred symbols - hope that along with this acceptance will come harmony, not just with each other, but also with the police. ‘Thou shall not steal’ is one of the most well-known of the Ten Commandments. Although most familiar to those in Christian circles, its message is universal and cuts across most religious boundaries. But while stealing – taking another’s property and therefore depriving him of it – is widely frowned upon, some have a wider definition for the word.

Why Apple Was Right To Remove The iPhone 7 Headphone Jack iPhone 7 and EarPods / Lightning headphones (Image: Apple) Apple’s new iPhone doesn’t have a headphone jack, only a Lightning port that’s also used to charge the battery. In-ear sound comes from the EarPods or other headphones with a Lightning connector, via a Lightning-to-3.5mm adapter (included) or wireless headphones such as AirPods (sold separately). Why did Apple remove a common audio connector? The 3.5mm jack is over 50-years-old and doesn’t do much besides carry an audio signal. It needs its own power amplifier and digital audio converter, which can be built into headphones, so removing the jack makes room for other things, such as a second speaker.

Comet (programming) Comet is a web application model in which a long-held HTTP request allows a web server to push data to a browser, without the browser explicitly requesting it.[1][2] Comet is an umbrella term, encompassing multiple techniques for achieving this interaction. All these methods rely on features included by default in browsers, such as JavaScript, rather than on non-default plugins. The Comet approach differs from the original model of the web, in which a browser requests a complete web page at a time.[3] The use of Comet techniques in web development predates the use of the word Comet as a neologism for the collective techniques.

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