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Wabi-sabi

Wabi-sabi
A Japanese tea house which reflects the wabi-sabi aesthetic in Kenroku-en (兼六園) Garden Wabi-sabi (侘寂?) represents a comprehensive Japanese world view or aesthetic centered on the acceptance of transience and imperfection. The aesthetic is sometimes described as one of beauty that is "imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete".[1] It is a concept derived from the Buddhist teaching of the three marks of existence (三法印, sanbōin?), specifically impermanence (無常, mujō?), the other two being suffering (苦, ku?) Description[edit] "Wabi-sabi is the most conspicuous and characteristic feature of traditional Japanese beauty and it occupies roughly the same position in the Japanese pantheon of aesthetic values as do the Greek ideals of beauty and perfection in the West".[1] "If an object or expression can bring about, within us, a sense of serene melancholy and a spiritual longing, then that object could be said to be wabi-sabi The words wabi and sabi do not translate easily. Western use[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabi-sabi

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Ryokan (Japanese inn) A ryokan (旅館?) is a type of traditional Japanese inn that originated in the Edo period (1603–1868), when such inns served travelers along Japan's highways. They typically feature tatami-matted rooms, communal baths, and other public areas where visitors may wear yukata and talk with the owner.[1] Ryokan are difficult to find in Tokyo and other large cities because many are expensive compared to hotels, and Japanese people increasingly use hotels for urban tourism. Wabi-Sabi The Japanese view of life embraced a simple aesthetic that grew stronger as inessentials were eliminatedand trimmed away. -architect Tadao Ando Pared down to its barest essence, wabi-sabi is the Japanese art of finding beauty in imperfection and profundity in nature, of accepting the natural cycle of growth, decay, and death. It's simple, slow, and uncluttered-and it reveres authenticity above all.

Iki (aesthetic ideal) Iki (いき, often written 粋) is a traditional aesthetic ideal of human behavior or volition in Japan, roughly "chic, stylish". The basis of iki is thought to have formed among urbane commoners (Chōnin) in Edo in the Tokugawa period.[1] Iki is sometimes misunderstood as simply "anything Japanese", but it is actually a specific aesthetic ideal, distinct from more ethereal notions of transcendence or poverty. As such, samurai, for example, would typically, as a class, be considered devoid of iki, (see yabo). At the same time, individual warriors are often depicted in contemporary popular imagination as embodying the iki ideals of a clear, stylish manner and blunt, unwavering directness.

Three marks of existence The Three marks of existence, within Buddhism, are three characteristics (Pali: tilakkhaṇa; Sanskrit: trilakṣaṇa) shared by all sentient beings, namely: impermanence (anicca); suffering or unsatisfactoriness (dukkha); non-self (Anatta). There is often a fourth Dharma Seal mentioned:[citation needed] Together the three characteristics of existence are called ti-lakkhana in Pali or tri-laksana in Sanskrit. By bringing the three (or four) seals into moment-to-moment experience through concentrated awareness, we are said to achieve wisdom—the third of the three higher trainings—the way out of samsara. Thus the method for leaving samsara involves a deep-rooted change in world view.

The artists who crossed the line - News, Art The two men are part of Voina, a radical art collective that has infuriated the Russian authorities with a series of increasingly audacious stunts, and whose jailing has caused concern in Russia about a return to a Soviet-style censorship of the arts. Over the past three years, the group's installations and performances have included organising the mock execution of migrant workers in a Moscow supermarket, an impromptu expletive-filled punk rock performance in a courtroom, throwing live cats at McDonald's cashiers and painting an enormous penis on a bridge in St Petersburg. The group first came to prominence in February 2008, two days before the carefully choreographed elections that brought President Dmitry Medvedev to power. About 12 activists, one of whom was a pregnant woman, entered the Biology Museum and staged an orgy. Soon, the stunts became bigger and harder to ignore.

Green Maverick Landscape architect Ng Sek San takes the unconventional route in his quest to find solutions that are simple, affordable and local. About eight years ago, landscape architect Ng Sek San became “really uncomfortable about the globalisation of design” and attempted a radical move: he decided that he would only take on commission work in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia where he’s based. In his work, Ng seeks to find egalitarian solutions that are simple, affordable and that tread the land as lightly as possible. He also invests his time in his personal (Sekeping) projects with, in his words, “total irrelevance to engineers, clients and local authorities” in a bid to explore alternative earth-friendly solutions on sensitive and challenging terrains as well as ordinary environments. Here he shares with us his thoughts.

Miyabi The ideal posed by the word demanded the elimination of anything that was absurd or vulgar and the "polishing of manners, diction, and feelings to eliminate all roughness and crudity so as to achieve the highest grace." It expressed that sensitivity to beauty which was the hallmark of the Heian era. Miyabi is often closely connected to the notion of Mono no aware, a bittersweet awareness of the transience of things, and thus it was thought that things in decline showed a great sense of miyabi.

Mono no aware Mono no aware (物の哀れ?), literally "the pathos of things", and also translated as "an empathy toward things", or "a sensitivity to ephemera", is a Japanese term for the awareness of impermanence (無常, mujō?), or transience of things, and both a transient gentle sadness (or wistfulness) at their passing as well as a longer, deeper gentle sadness about this state being the reality of life. Origins[edit] The term was coined in the 18th century by the Edo period Japanese cultural scholar Motoori Norinaga and was originally a concept used in his literary criticism of The Tale of Genji, later applied to other seminal Japanese works including the Man'yōshū. The Future This is an oracle like any other oracle, like the I Ching or astrology or Tarot cards - a technique for divining your future. The only real difference is that those are very old methods and this one is very new. But there was a first day for Tarot cards too, and the best friend of the person who invented them felt just like you do, suuuuper skeptical. (Especially since the Tarot card inventor kept saying things like “Oh, that card's not quite done yet” and “I'm gonna change that part”.)

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