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World Population: The fall of Asia and the rise of Africa

World Population: The fall of Asia and the rise of Africa
Population of the World, 1800-2100* country size = share of world population * 2100 population figures are projections from the UN’s Population Division gif version For thousands of years, Asia has been the population center of the world. But that’s about to change. Asia contains 7 of the 10 most populous countries in the world, the two largest of which, China and India, each individually have larger populations than Africa, Europe, or the Americas. Two hundred years ago, the figures were even more extreme. Asia dominates the world population landscape, and it has for at least the last two and a half thousand years. % of world population living in Asia, Africa, and Europe (400 BC – 2100 AD) By 2100, the population of Africa is expected to catch up with Asia. According to the U.N. In order to account for uncertainties in estimating future fertility rates, the U.N. produces a range of population projections using different assumptions. Population by region, 2015-2100 Attribution: Follow Metrocosm

http://metrocosm.com/world-population-history-map/

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Atlas for a Changing Planet Understanding natural and human systems is an essential first step toward reducing the severity of climate change and adapting to a warmer future. Maps and geographic information systems are the primary tools by which scientists, policymakers, planners, and activists visualize and understand our rapidly changing world. Spatial information informs decisions about how to build a better future. *****The most detailed map of Australian population density ever The Australian Bureau of Statistics has released what is probably the most detailed geographic view of population density in Australia. The dataset shows the population per square kilometre from the 2011 census, the first time a grid has been used for these figures. This gives a significant increase in detail, particularly in regional areas, over previous approaches. Here I’ve converted their data to an interactive map so you can see specific areas in greater detail. Update: I’ve created two other versions on request from commenters. Here’s the same map with a log scale to better view the population difference in regional areas, and here’s one with transparency and place names.

indy100.independent.co The official campaign period for the upcoming EU referendum begins on April 15th. But as all of us poor b-----ds already know, Brexit stats trying to persuade us to vote In or Out are already flying about all over the place. If you're already tired of the Brexit rhetoric, indy100 has taken a look back at our own data from stories about Europe to date. Whatever your opinion on the EU, these facts and figures are food for thought: 1.

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Think the world is overcrowded? These 10 maps show why you’re wrong Italy Based on data from NASA/SEDAC, this map shows how Italy’s population is distributed – half lives in the densely-packed purple areas (8% of the land), half lives in the sparse grey areas (92% of the land). Image: metrocosm ***World Population Density Interactive Map Visualising Population Density Across the Globe This exploratory map shows data from the fantastic Global Human Settlement Layer (GHSL) produced by the European Commission. Integrating huge volumes of satellite data with national census data, the GHSL has applications for a wide range of research and policy related to urban growth, development and sustainability, and is available as open data. The dataset encourages understanding of the complex hierarchy of human settlement, rather than making simple rural-urban divisions. Some introductory highlights are discussed here with links for further information. Megaregions and Diverse Urban Forms

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Timelapse – Google Earth Engine Timelapse is optimized for interactive exploration on desktop browsers. For the full interactive experience, view this page on desktop. Timelapse is a global, zoomable video that lets you see how the Earth has changed over the past 32 years.

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