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Four questions that encourage growth mindset among students

Four questions that encourage growth mindset among students
Teachers have long battled with how to get their students to become more resilient and improve their mindset. One popular theory, pioneered by Carol Dweck, professor of psychology at Stanford University, is the idea of growth mindset. Dweck explains that some students believe ability is malleable and can be improved (a growth mindset), while others think it is set in stone, probably decided at birth (a fixed mindset). Evidence suggests that those with a growth mindset seek out feedback on how to get better, persist with work for longer and cope better with change – all attitudes teachers want to develop in their young charges. How can teachers encourage a growth mindset? When working with young people, choosing which behaviours to praise can have a profound impact. As well as thinking of the feedback you offer your class, there are certain questions you can ask to get them thinking about their own mindset: Is the effort today worth the reward tomorrow? This can be a simple weekend project.

http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/2015/nov/15/four-questions-encourage-growth-mindset-students

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