background preloader

History of Reggae

History of Reggae
Reggae is a term that was coined sometime close to 1960. Derived from rege-rege, a Jamaican phrase meaning “rags or ragged clothing,” it is used to denote a raggedy style of music that grew up in Jamaica around that time. Reggae is a genre of music that has its roots in a number of other musical styles. It incorporates influences from Jamaican music (both traditional Mento and contemporary Ska), as well as American Rhythm & Blues, which was broadcast from high-powered stations in New Orleans and Florida in the early days of radio, and could be easily picked up in Jamaica. Reggae’s closest musical relations are Ska and Rocksteady, popular in Jamaica during the 1950s and early 1960s. Reggae evolved from these other genres, really coming into its own later that decade. Reggae shares many characteristics with Ska, such as a walking bass line with guitar and piano off-beats, but Ska is faster paced and also tends to incorporates jazz-influenced horn riffs.

http://thereggaskas.com/useful-information/history-of-reggae/

Related:  Assignment Ethnic Music North AmericamayaoAssignment Ethnic Music North AmericaResearch 1Reggae

Havel Edward Havel Rhetoric of Reggae Research Paper Professor Alfred Snider (Tuna) Drums and Bass Guitar: The Foundation of Reggae Music Reggae is a style of music that needs a strong backbone and a strong driving force. Music Genre: Salsa - Music of Puerto Rico Introduction The most widely heard and influential form of music from Puerto Rico today is called salsa. The term translates to English as "sauce" to denote music that spices and enlivens things. But not just any music. It is a complex musical genre that evolved from many roots into a uniquely Puerto Rican product. It could be said that "salsa" is primarily a commercial tag for contemporary Latin pop music that connotes a feeling that sums up the variety of redefined and reinterpreted styles at its roots. It encompasses a broad range of musical genres, instrumental combinations and cultural influences, ranging from Cuban son montuno, Puerto Rican bomba and plena, Dominican merengue, Cuban Yoruba ritual music and Afro-American jazz and rhythm and blues.

A History of Reggae Music Jamaica: the mento TM, ®, Copyright © 2003 Piero Scaruffi All rights reserved. (See Background: The 20th Century) The first Jamaican recording studio opened in 1951 and recorded "mento" music, a fusion of European and African folk dance music. The island was awash in rhythm'n'blues records imported by the so called "sound systems", eccentric traveling dance-halls run by no less eccentric disc-jockeys such as Clement Dodd (the "Downbeat") and Duke Reid (the "Trojan").

Native American music Native American music. The music of Native North Americans is primarily a vocal art, usually choral, although some nations favor solo singing. Native American music is entirely melodic; there is no harmony or polyphony, although there is occasional antiphonal singing between soloist and chorus. The melody is, in general, characterized by a descending melodic figure; its rhythm is irregular. There is no conception of absolute pitch and intonation can appear uncertain, the result of the distinctive method of voice production, involving muscular tension in the vocal apparatus and making possible frequent strong accents and glissandos. Singing is nearly always accompanied, at least by drums.

Native American music and culture Music plays an integral role in the life of Native Americans. It is used for ceremonial purposes, recreation, expression, and healing. There are many different instruments used when making Native American music, including drums, flutes, and other percussion instruments. Perhaps the most important element of their music is the voice. Vocals are the backbone of the music made in Native American cultures. Unusual, irregular rhythms and a somewhat off-key style of singing is used. The 100 Best Bob Marley Songs When asked about the beginnings of his music career, Robert Nesta Marley a.k.a. Bob Marley told Jamaican radio personality Neville Willoughby that he "started out crying." Though Bob never tired of playing games with interviewers' heads, his answer had at least a grain of truth to it. No matter now many times his smiling face has been appropriated as the image of ganja-fueled frat-party hedonism, the real Bob Marley was determined to risk everything so that he might use his God-given gifts to be a "wailer"—literally crying out on behalf of downtrodden people all around the world. He did all this while championing a genre of music that was new to most international ears, while espousing beliefs that seemed far-out to say the least, and while rocking a funny-looking hairstyle and smoking some very funny-looking cigarettes.

The History of Salsa Music By Tijana Ilich Updated September 11, 2016. Salsa is a word that inspires an instant reaction in Latin music lovers everywhere. It is the rhythm, the dance, the musical excitement that sends millions of normally sedate non-Latinos to the dance floor where they meet their Latin neighbors, who are too busy enjoying the music to notice. Birthplace of Salsa There’s a lot of debate about the place where salsa was born. The Roots of Tejano and Conjunto Music Arhoolie RecordsMusic Excerpts, Liner Notes, and Photos All music excerpts, liner notes, and photos on this page are the property of: Arhoolie Records, 10341 San Pablo Av., El Cerrito, CA 94530 The roots of Tejano and Conjunto music are as widespread and diverse, and run as deep, as the traditions, cultures and people which gave them life. The main root is the music of Mexico with all its regional and class variations, its extraordinary range of songs and dances, and its social and religious musics ranging from the solo voice to the powerful sound of the bandas from Sinaloa to the highly stylized format of today's mariachis.

how to play reggae - The Top 10 Reggae Instruments and Some Here are the top 10 reggae instruments you will see in most reggae band and hear on most reggae recordings. Let me reiterate, these are just the top 10 reggae instruments and some, please note that any instrument can be used in reggae. Peter Tosh was known to have used up to twent y reggae instruments at a time to record. 1. The Guitar Descriptions of Salsa Music Instruments ~ www.justsalsa.com The Bongos ~ A pair of round drums held in the knees and struck with the hand. The Botijuela ~ A bottle used to store oil that was used as a bass in original Son bands. The Claves ~ They keep the rhythm in the music and guide the dancers feet. The Conga Drum ~ A skined.drum played with the palms.

Cajun and Zydeco Music Traditions By Barry J. Ancelet Cajun music and zydeco are closely related parallel music forms. Cajun music is the music of the white Cajuns of south Louisiana, while zydeco is the music of the black Creoles of the same region. Both share common origins and influences, and there is much overlap in the repertoire and style of each. At the same time, each culture proudly and carefully preserves the identity of its own musical expression.

Bob Marley - Biography - Singer, Songwriter Jamaican singer, musician and songwriter Bob Marley served as a world ambassador for reggae music and sold more than 20 million records throughout his career—making him the first international superstar to emerge from the so-called Third World. Synopsis Bob Marley was born on February 6, 1945, in St. American Sabor The term “Tejano” came to be applied in the 1980s to popular music rooted in South Texas. Tejano does not describe a singular musical style; rather, it refers to a long process of musical hybridity. During Tejano’s formative years in the ‘60s, musical ensembles including the conjunto, the orquesta, and rhythm and blues and rock ‘n’ roll combos laid the foundations. These ensembles brought different musical styles into the mix such as polcas, rancheras, blues, rock, country, and Afro-Caribbean rhythms. In the ‘70s the music solidified, not into a cohesive style, but into a new consciousness and pride in Chicano culture referred to as La Onda Chicana (The Chicano Wave).

Biography & History Reggae's most transcendent and iconic figure, Bob Marley was the first Jamaican artist to achieve international superstardom, in the process introducing the music of his native island nation to the far-flung corners of the globe. Marley's music gave voice to the day-to-day struggles of the Jamaican experience, vividly capturing not only the plight of the country's impoverished and oppressed but also the devout spirituality that remains their source of strength. His songs of faith, devotion, and revolution created a legacy that continues to live on not only through the music of his extended family but also through generations of artists the world over touched by his genius. Robert Nesta Marley was born February 6, 1945, in rural St. Ann's Parish, Jamaica; the son of a middle-aged white father and teenaged black mother, he left home at 14 to pursue a music career in Kingston, becoming a pupil of local singer and devout Rastafarian Joe Higgs.

Related: