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Victorian & Steampunk Name Generator

Victorian & Steampunk Name Generator

http://oobleck.org/steam/

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Fantasy Name Generator By Samuel Stoddard - Version 1.5 One of the perks of creating fantasy stories -- whether by writing a story or game or by role-playing -- is you get to make up the names. Some people relish the task while others are frustrated by it. Some like it but can't seem to create names that are diverse enough. The Simple, Ridiculously Useful Guide to Earning a Living from Your Passion... Post written by Leo Babauta. So you’ve followed the Short But Powerful Guide to Finding Your Passion, and have chosen something you’re passionate about. Now you need to make it a career — but are perhaps a bit lost.

speech accent archive: how to How to use this site Welcome to the speech accent archive. Each individual sample page contains a sound control bar, a set of the answers to 7 demographic questions, a phonetic transcription of the sample,1 a set of the speaker's phonological generalizations, a link to a map showing the speaker's place of birth, and a link to the Ethnologue language database. The archive also contains a set of native language phonetic inventories so that you can perform some contrastive analyses.

Pet Name Generator Naming of animals Pet names often reflect the owner's view of the animal, and the expectations and feelings they have for it. Some pet owners give human names to their dogs and cats. Guild Wars Namegenerator (beta) - PORFL.de - what the ..?! Welcome to the Guild Wars Namegenerator! With this tool you can create name suggestions for your character of every race and gender. Please also have a look at the fantastic german Guild Wars Fansites Wartower.de and Guild-Wars2.info. Please remember that the current database is small. Also there are less information about Sylvari and Asura names.

Themes & Things To Keep In Mind When Writing Fantasy Stories and... This list is far from complete. It’s not even trying to be complete. It knows better than that. It just wants to be helpful and provide some inspiration here and there; you know, offer little suggestions that might lead to bigger ideas. (Especially by using the words offered as Wikipedia searches!) Lingua Franca Writing tutors, teaching assistants, usage columnists, and even word-processor grammar-checkers flag passives for “correction” because they have been told they should. (The disastrously confused Page 18 of Strunk & White’s The Elements of Style is often implicated—but don’t get me started on them.) These critics are often clearly inexpert at accurate identification of what they deprecate: collecting published critical comments about the passive by soi-disant rhetoric gurus, I have found that the most frequently occurring score for telling passives from actives is zero (I put this extraordinary statistic aside to discuss another day). Naturally, the critics also have no idea how many they use themselves.

How To Steal Like An Artist (And 9 Other Things Nobody Told Me) - Austin Kleon Wednesday, March 30th, 2011 Buy the book: Amazon | B&N | More… Here’s what a few folks have said about it: “Brilliant and real and true.”—Rosanne Cash“Filled with well-formed advice that applies to nearly any kind of work.”—Lifehacker.com“Immersing yourself in Steal Like An Artist is as fine an investment in the life of your mind as you can hope to make.”

Shakespeare Insult Kit Shakespeare Insult Kit Since 1996, the origin of this kit was listed as anonymous. It came to me on a piece of paper in the 90's with no attribution, and I thought it would make a cool web page. Though I searched for the origin, I could never find it. Character Name Generator Ever get stuck for names of NPCs your player characters run into that you never expected to provide them? Here?s a fast and easy way to have many monikers on hand when Rodar the fighter wants to know the name of the brash drunk challenging him to a fight in the tavern, or the name of the shy barmaid over whom they? Eight Secrets Which Writers Won't Tell You Image from Flickr by Lazurite This is not particularly relevant to the post, but I’m getting an awful lot of comments telling me, often a little snarkily, “it’s ‘THAT’ not ‘WHICH’”. The “don’t use which for restrictive clauses” rule comes (as far as I can tell) from Strunk and White. Plenty of authors, including Austen, have used “which” exactly as I use it in the title. It’s very commonly used like this here in England, so I’m guessing my comments are coming from US readers. There was never a period in the history of English when “which” at the beginning of a restrictive relative clause was an error.

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