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Tejano music

Tejano music or Tex-Mex music (Texan-Mexican music) is the name given to various forms of folk and popular music originating among the Mexican-American populations of Central and Southern Texas. With roots in the late 19th century, it became a music genre with a wider audience in the late 20th century thanks to artists such as Selena (often referred to as "The Queen of Tejano"), Mazz, La Mafia, La Sombra, Elida Reyna, Elsa García, Laura Canales, Oscar Estrada, Jay Perez, Emilio Navaira, Gary Hobbs, Shelly Lares, Stefani Montiel, David Lee Garza, Jennifer Peña, and La Fiebre. Origins[edit] Europeans from Germany (first during Spanish time and 1830s), Poland, and what is now the Czech Republic migrated to Texas and Mexico, bringing with them their style of music and dance. At the turn of the century, Tejanos were mostly involved in ranching and agriculture. In the 1950s and 1960s, rock and roll and country music made inroads, and electric guitars and drums were added to conjunto combos.

Cajun Music: Alive and Well in Louisiana By Ann Savoy One of French Louisiana's most vital attractions is its music. Acadian music has undergone vast changes since arriving in Louisiana, to a large extent because those who play it today live so differently from earlier residents. Understanding Cajun music in all its variety is a large undertaking but an important one. Today, we in Louisiana are fortunate to have living representatives of many of its various styles and stages. Excerpt, J'ai Ete Au Bal: Cajun and Zydeco Music of Louisiana. One of the earliest forms of music in Louisiana was the unaccompanied ballad. Although today television, radio and air conditioners have lured people off their porches and made gatherings of friends less frequent, some of the older people still remember the days when neighbors sat together and shared songs. Marc Savoy (center on Fiddle) in his Saturday morning Cajun music jam session at his music store in Eunice, Louisiana. Other changes came to the Cajun music scene with the string bands.

Native American music Native American music. The music of Native North Americans is primarily a vocal art, usually choral, although some nations favor solo singing. Native American music is entirely melodic; there is no harmony or polyphony, although there is occasional antiphonal singing between soloist and chorus. The melody is, in general, characterized by a descending melodic figure; its rhythm is irregular. For the Native American, song is traditionally the chief means of communicating with the supernatural powers, and music is seldom performed for its own sake; definite results, such as the bringing of rain, success in battle, or the curing of the sick, are expected from music. See also North American Native art; Native American languages. See F. The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. See more Encyclopedia articles on: Music: History

reggae | music Reggae, style of popular music that originated in Jamaica in the late 1960s and quickly emerged as the country’s dominant music. By the 1970s it had become an international style that was particularly popular in Britain, the United States, and Africa. It was widely perceived as a voice of the oppressed. According to an early definition in The Dictionary of Jamaican English (1980), reggae is based on ska, an earlier form of Jamaican popular music, and employs a heavy four-beat rhythm driven by drums, bass guitar, electric guitar, and the “scraper,” a corrugated stick that is rubbed by a plain stick. In the mid-1960s, under the direction of producers such as Duke Reid and Coxsone Dodd, Jamaican musicians dramatically slowed the tempo of ska, whose energetic rhythms reflected the optimism that had heralded Jamaica’s independence from Britain in 1962. Reggae evolved from these roots and bore the weight of increasingly politicized lyrics that addressed social and economic injustice.

GCSE Bitesize: African music What is celtic music? The term 'celtic music' is a rather loose one; for the purpose of Ceolas, it covers the traditional music of the celtic countries - Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany (in France), Galicia (in Spain) and areas which have come under their influence, such as the US and the maritime provinces of Canada, as well as some newer music based on the tradition from these countries. The term is sometimes controversial. For starters, the Celts as an identifiable race are long gone, there are strong differences between traditional music in the different countries, and many of the similarities are due to more recent influences. It is also worth remembering that even a term such as 'Irish traditional music' is a lumping together of many different styles, from the raw, Scottish-tinged music of Donegal to the lyrical, easy-going style of Clare and many other regional styles that are only partly compatible. The Celtic Music Regions More information from the Irish Traditional Music Archive

About Japanese Music The earliest forms of music were drums and flute music accompanying the kagura shrine dances. From the 6th century on, music came from Korean and Chinese courts and monasteries and was performed at the Japanese court under the generic name gagaku (court music). The 8th-century court established a music bureau (gagakuryo) to be in charge of musical duties, both ritual and entertainment. The standard full-range gagaku ensemble has about 16 musicians on percussion, string, and reed instruments, the most distinctive being the free-reed mouth organ (sho), cyndrical oboe (hichiriki), the biwa lute, and the koto zither. Meanwhile with the introduction of Buddhism to Japan in the 6th century, Buddhist rites and liturgical chants gave rise to the development of a great variety of bells, gongs, wooden clappers, plaques, percussion tubes, and rattles, many of which found their way also into kabuki music of the Edo period (1600-1868).

Music of Indonesia The music of Indonesia demonstrates its cultural diversity, the local musical creativity, as well as subsequent foreign musical influences that shaped contemporary music scenes of Indonesia. Nearly thousands of Indonesian islands having its own cultural and artistic history and character.[1] This results in hundreds of different forms of music, which often accompanies by dance and theatre. Traditional regional musics and songs of Indonesia natively compromises of strong beat and harmony type musics with strong influence of California and Malay classical music. The influence is strongly visible in the traditional popular music genre of Dangdut. Musical instruments[edit] Balinese gamelan performance. SambaSunda music performance, featuring traditional Sundanese music instruments such as kecapi, suling, and kendang. Gamelan[edit] With the arrival of the Dutch colonisers, a number system called kepatihan was developed to record the music. Kecapi suling[edit] Angklung[edit] Kulintang[edit] Pop[edit]

What is Jewish Music? Jewish music stems from ancient prayer chants of the Levant some 3000 years ago. The musical notation that developed and that we find in the bible today is one of the most ancient forms of notated music, and yet it is still in current practice all over the world today. Jewish music has been constantly adapting to new conditions and yet retaining its identity in many widely differing ethnic, social and religious environments. Through its daughter religions, the music of Judaism is one of the fundamental elements in the understanding of the sacred and secular traditions of Europe and the Near East, first having influenced, and then having been influenced by, the music of Christian and Islamic cultures. The study of Jewish music encompasses many genres of religious, semi religious and folk music used in the synagogue and in the Jewish home and also art music using Jewish texts or themes. Ashkenazi Music (Klezmer) Sephardi Music Israeli Music Synagogue Music Suppressed Music

Klezmer Music 101 - Jewish Traditions By Megan Romer Updated October 04, 2016. Originally, the word "klezmer," from the Yiddish language, meant "vessel of song" and later, simply "musician." However, it has come to characterize the style of secular music played by Ashkenazi Jews for joyful celebrations such as weddings. What Does Klezmer Music Sound Like? Klezmer music is intended to replicate the human voice including sounds of crying, wailing and laughing. Non-Traditional Influences on Klezmer Music Klezmer music draws on centuries-old Jewish traditions and incorporates various sounds of music from European and international traditions, including Roma (gypsy) music, Eastern European folk music (particularly Russian music), French Cafe music and early jazz. continue reading below our video Dancing to Klezmer Music Klezmer music is made for dancing. These klezmer pieces are meant for dancing, including fast and slow tempos: Klezmer Music and the Holocaust Recommended Klezmer Music Starter CDs

Peruvian Music The Peru music is a fusion of sounds and styles drawing on Peru's Andean, Spanish, and African roots. After hundreds years of cultural mixing, there have been created a broad musical landscape over Peru. Typical instruments used are, for example, the flute and the antara or zampoña, the box and the traditional guitar, which in Peru has also a smaller variant, known as the "charango" and mandolin. There are thousands of pre-Hispanic dances and mestizo. Central, northern and southern Andes is famous for preserving traditional rhythms and huayno parade. Before the Viceroyalty of Peru, much of the Peruvian territory constituted the Tahuantinsuyo uniting several of the oldest cultures such as Chavin, Paracas, Moche, Chimu, Nazca and 20 other minors, the ancient people of the Nazca culture, were the major Pre-Columbian musicians in the continent. The Incas used a wide variety of musical instruments, some as: Peruvian music is dominated by the national instrument, the charango. Andean Music

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