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Billie Holiday - Strange Fruit

Billie Holiday - Strange Fruit

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4ZyuULy9zs

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"Run Old Jeremiah": Echoes of the Ring Shout Spirituals and work songs, rooted in both the slavery era and the West African societies from which most African-American slaves were originally taken, provided cultural sustenance to African Americans in the midst of intense racial oppression. Folklorists first began collecting traditional southern music in the late-19th century. By the 1920s and 1930s, John and Alan Lomax were recording southern musicians (African-American, white, and Mexican-American) for the Library of Congress.

African American Department - Harlem Renaissance Concept Guide - Music Born in Philadelphia in 1897, Marian Anderson was the first black singer to join the Metropolitan Opera. Throughout her career her recital programs mixed arias, art songs, and spirituals. Marian Anderson began singing at a young age and by the time she was six she was singing with the Union Baptist Junior Choir, At age 13 she was singing with the Senior Choir and substituting for absent choir members. She was often sent to represent the church choirs and quartets at competitions in New York City. American History: The Civil Rights Movement STEVE EMBER: Welcome to THE MAKING OF A NATION – American history in VOA Special English. I’m Steve Ember. Today, we tell about the movement for civil rights for black Americans. The day is August twenty-eighth, nineteen sixty-three. More than two hundred fifty thousand people are gathered in Washington. Black and white, young and old, they demand equal treatment for black Americans.

Billie Holiday - About the Singer Considered by many to be the greatest jazz vocalist of all time, Billie Holiday lived a tempestuous and difficult life. Her singing expressed an incredible depth of emotion that spoke of hard times and injustice as well as triumph. Though her career was relatively short and often erratic, she left behind a body of work as great as any vocalist before or since. Born Eleanora Fagan in 1915, Billie Holiday spent much of her young life in Baltimore, Maryland. Raised primarily by her mother, Holiday had only a tenuous connection with her father, who was a jazz guitarist in Fletcher Henderson’s band. Living in extreme poverty, Holiday dropped out of school in the fifth grade and found a job running errands in a brothel.

Strange Fruit "Strange Fruit" is a song performed most famously by Billie Holiday, who first sang and recorded it in 1939. Written by the teacher Abel Meeropol as a poem, it exposed American racism, particularly the lynching of African Americans. Such lynchings had occurred chiefly in the South but also in other regions of the United States.[2][3] Meeropol set it to music and with his wife and the singer Laura Duncan, performed it as a protest song in New York venues, including Madison Square Garden. The song has been covered by artists, as well as inspiring novels, other poems and other creative works. In 1978, Holiday's version of the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.[4] It was also included in the list of Songs of the Century, by the Recording Industry of America and the National Endowment for the Arts.

"Trouble So Hard": Singing of Slavery and Freedom Spirituals and work songs, rooted in both the slavery era and the West African societies from which most African-American slaves were originally taken, provided cultural sustenance to African Americans in the midst of intense racial oppression. Folklorists first began collecting traditional southern music in the late-19th century. In the 1920s and 1930s, John Lomax (and other members of his family) recorded southern musicians (African-American, white, and Mexican-American) for the Library of Congress. “Trouble So Hard,” sung by Dock Reed, Henry Reed, and Vera Hall in Livingston, Alabama, in 1937, was reminiscent in style of the slavery era, when the congregation sang without hymnbooks or musical accompaniment. The style of singing—the lead singer’s call and the congregation’s increasingly loud and forceful response—had its roots in African religious practice.

The Harlem Renaissance The Savoy Ballroom in Harlem in 1926 was The Place and Lindy Hop was The Dance! It was time for a cultural celebration. African Americans had endured centuries of slavery and the struggle for abolition. The end of bondage had not brought the promised land many had envisioned. Instead, white supremacy was quickly, legally, and violently restored to the New South, where ninety percent of African Americans lived.

How to use film creatively in class: teaching tips and ideas – live chat Wheeling out the TV and showing a movie has long been the teacher’s secret weapon to calm a distracted class at the end of term. But now many teachers in the UK are using film more creatively in their lessons. Former teacher Adwoa Oforiwa uses the storytelling element of films, such as Oliver Twist, to improve her students’ narrative writing. In a blog for the Guardian, Oforiwa writes: “In the classroom, film is more than just the carrot after the stick of ploughing through a book with young people. African-American Civil Rights Movement (1955–68) - Wikipedia The African-American Civil Rights Movement or 1960s Civil Rights Movement encompasses social movements in the United States whose goals were to end racial segregation and discrimination against black Americans and to secure legal recognition and federal protection of the citizenship rights enumerated in the Constitution and federal law. This article covers the phase of the movement between 1954 and 1968, particularly in the South. A wave of inner city riots in black communities from 1964 through 1970 undercut support from the white community. The emergence of the Black Power movement, which lasted from about 1966 to 1975, challenged the established black leadership for its cooperative attitude and its nonviolence, and instead demanded political and economic self-sufficiency. During the same time as African Americans were being disenfranchised, white Democrats imposed racial segregation by law.

Lynching in the United States Lynching, the practice of killing people by extrajudicial mob action, occurred in the United States chiefly from the late 18th century through the 1960s. Lynchings took place most frequently against African American men in the Southern US from 1890 to the 1920s with a peak in 1892. Lynchings were also very common in the Old West, although victims were of various races.[1] Lynching in the South is associated with the reimposition of white supremacy by whites after the American Civil War. The granting of U.S. Constitutional rights to freedmen in the Reconstruction era (1865–1877) aroused anxieties among white Southerners, who were not ready to concede social status to African Americans, blaming the freedmen for their own wartime hardship, economic loss, and forfeiture of social and political privilege.

"It's a long John": Traditional African-American Work Songs Spirituals and work songs, rooted in both the slavery era and the West African societies from which most African-American slaves were originally taken, provided cultural sustenance to African Americans in the midst of intense racial oppression. They first came to be valued by northern white audiences in the late-19th century. Later, folklorists began collecting (and eventually recording) traditional southern music. John and Alan Lomax recorded southern musicians (African-American, white, and Mexican-American) for the Library of Congress.

Drop Me Off in Harlem Eubie Blake Lyricist, composer, pianist 1883-1983 Cab Calloway Vocalist, bandleader 1907-1994 Duke Ellington Composer, musician, bandleader 1899-1974 Fletcher Henderson Bandleader, arranger, pianist 1897-1952 James Johnson Pianist, composer 1894-1955 Bessie Smith Singer 1894-1937 William Still Composer, arranger, conductor 1895-1978 Fats Waller Pianist, vocalist, composer 1904-1943 Chick Webb Drummer, bandleader 1909-1939 Use Popular Music to Improve Reading and Inspire Writing Teaching would be the easiest job in the world if following mandated curriculum and reading from your latest teacher’s edition meant all of your students would listen and learn. But we know that teaching involves lighting a spark in students that motivates, inspires, and makes them want to learn and achieve. We also know that what ignites a student’s passion for learning varies from student to student — there is no one-size-fits-all approach. Over the years, I’ve discovered that one way to engage almost every student, even those who are reluctant readers and writers, is through song. This week I’ll share with you some of the ways I use music to inspire, motivate, and teach reading and writing (along with life skills!)

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