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The History of Human Thinking (in 6 minutes, 4 seconds)‬‏

Related:  Think!To think or not to think

How to Think Like a Genius Edit Article One Methods:Metaphorming: The Official "Think Like a Genius"® Method There are many ways to classify a genius. But if you look at the historical figures whom most people would consider geniuses, such as Albert Einstein, Leonardo Da Vinci, and Beethoven, you can see one thing they all share in common: they were all able to think in a way different from the mainstream, and thus made connections that no one else did. Based on that pattern, this article will address some of the ways you can think like a genius. Ad Steps <img alt="Think Like a Genius Step 1 Version 3.jpg" src=" width="670" height="503">1Love learning. <img alt="Think Like a Genius Step 6 Version 3.jpg" src=" width="670" height="503">6Think differently. Tips

15 styles of Distorted Thinking 15 styles of Distorted Thinking Filtering: You take the negative details and magnify them while filtering out all positive aspects of a situation. Polarized Thinking: Things are black or white, good or bad. You have to be perfect or you're a failure. There is no middle ground. Checklist for Hidden Anger Procrastination in the completion of imposed tasks. Identify a Lie with 6 Simple Questions post written by: Marc Chernoff Email We all fall victim to at least a few lies during the course of our lifetime. Some lies may be extremely troublesome to our personal wellbeing, while other “white lies” may be far more innocuous. Either way, a lie is meant to deceive. So how can we avoid falling victim to a lie in the future? A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.- Mark Twain How do you know this? If you enjoyed this article, check out our new best-selling book. And get inspiring life tips and quotes in your inbox (it's free)...

50 Common Cognitive Distortions 3. Negative predictions. Overestimating the likelihood that an action will have a negative outcome. 4. Underestimating coping ability. Underestimating your ability cope with negative events. 5. Thinking of unpleasant events as catastrophes. 6. For example, during social interactions, paying attention to someone yawning but not paying the same degree of attention to other cues that suggest they are interested in what you’re saying (such as them leaning in). 7. Remembering negatives from a social situation and not remembering positives. 8. Believing an absence of a smiley-face in an email means someone is mad at you. 9. The belief that achieving unrelentingly high standards is necessary to avoid a catastrophe. 10. Believing the same rules that apply to others should not apply to you. 11. For example, I’ve made progress toward my goal and therefore it’s ok if I act in a way that is inconsistent with it. 12. For example, believing that poor people must deserve to be poor. 13. 14. It’s not. 15. 16.

Cognitive Dissonance Explanations > Theories > Cognitive Dissonance Description | Research | Example | So What? | See also | References Description This is the feeling of uncomfortable tension which comes from holding two conflicting thoughts in the mind at the same time. Dissonance increases with: The importance of the subject to us. Dissonance is often strong when we believe something about ourselves and then do something against that belief. Cognitive dissonance is a very powerful motivator which will often lead us to change one or other of the conflicting belief or action. Change our behavior. Dissonance is most powerful when it is about our self-image. If an action has been completed and cannot be undone, then the after-the-fact dissonance compels us to change our beliefs. Cognitive dissonance appears in virtually all evaluations and decisions and is the central mechanism by which we experience new differences in the world. Note: Self-Perception Theory gives an alternative view. Research Example So what?

Top 10 Common Faults In Human Thought Humans The human mind is a wonderful thing. Cognition, the act or process of thinking, enables us to process vast amounts of information quickly. For example, every time your eyes are open, you brain is constantly being bombarded with stimuli. The Gambler’s fallacy is the tendency to think that future probabilities are altered by past events, when in reality, they are not. Reactivity is the tendency of people to act or appear differently when they know that they are being observed. Pareidolia is when random images or sounds are perceived as significant. Interesting Fact: the Rorschach Inkblot test was developed to use pareidolia to tap into people’s mental states. Self-fulfilling Prophecy Self-fulfilling prophecy is engaging in behaviors that obtain results that confirm existing attitudes. Interesting Fact: Economic Recessions are self-fulfilling prophecies. Herd mentality is the tendency to adopt the opinions and follow the behaviors of the majority to feel safer and to avoid conflict.

List of cognitive biases Cognitive biases are systematic patterns of deviation from norm or rationality in judgment, and are often studied in psychology and behavioral economics.[1] There are also controversies over some of these biases as to whether they count as useless or irrational, or whether they result in useful attitudes or behavior. For example, when getting to know others, people tend to ask leading questions which seem biased towards confirming their assumptions about the person. Although this research overwhelmingly involves human subjects, some findings that demonstrate bias have been found in non-human animals as well. Decision-making, belief, and behavioral biases[edit] Many of these biases affect belief formation, business and economic decisions, and human behavior in general. Social biases[edit] Most of these biases are labeled as attributional biases. Memory errors and biases[edit] See also[edit] [edit] ^ Haselton, M. References[edit] Baron, Jonathan (1994).

35 Ultimate Psychology Facts - PsychTronics 35 Ultimate Psychology Facts Amazing Psychology facts which you don’t even find in google search. These are psychology facts which are taken from the most experienced and top level psychologists. 1.When it comes to placebo, studies have found that a capsule works better than a tablet, and a syringe works better than a capsule (in terms of how successful the placebo effect is). 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. red makes anyone more sexually attractive, but i learned that wearing blue makes men especially more attractive to women. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. Stay tune for new posts!

Think Complexity by Allen B. Downey Buy this book from Amazon.com. Download this book in PDF. Read this book online. Description This book is about complexity science, data structures and algorithms, intermediate programming in Python, and the philosophy of science: Data structures and algorithms: A data structure is a collection that contains data elements organized in a way that supports particular operations. This book focuses on discrete models, which include graphs, cellular automata, and agent-based models. Complexity science is an interdisciplinary field---at the intersection of mathematics, computer science and physics---that focuses on these kinds of models. Free books! This book is under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License, which means that you are free to copy, distribute, and modify it, as long as you attribute the work and don't use it for commercial purposes. Download the LaTeX source code (with figures and a Makefile) in a zip file.

The Nature of the Self: Experimental Philosopher Joshua Knobe on How We Know Who We Are by Maria Popova A mind-bending new understanding of our basic existential anchor. “The fate of the world depends on the Selves of human beings,” pioneering educator Annemarie Roeper wrote in her meditation on how poorly we understand the self. Over the past decade, the emerging field of experimental philosophy — a discipline that pursues inquiries about the human condition traditionally from the realm of philosophy with the empirical methods of psychology — has tackled this paradox, along with its many fringe concerns spanning morality, happiness, love, and how to live. Though the full talk is remarkable in its entirety and is well worth the watch, here is what I find to be Knobe’s most poignant pause-giver: One specific thing [has] really been exploding in the past couple of years and this is experimental philosophy work on the notion of the self. Donating = Loving Bringing you (ad-free) Brain Pickings takes hundreds of hours each month. Brain Pickings has a free weekly newsletter.

The Fine Art of Baloney Detection It makes your head spin. "The Fine Art of Baloney Detection"[1] is an essay by Carl Sagan in his seminal work against pseudoscience, The Demon-Haunted World. In this essay, he gives advice for devising conclusions, as well as advice for avoiding logical and rhetorical fallacies. [edit] What to look out for [edit] The Bullshit Detection Kit Apart from pointing out these common fallacies, Sagan makes a few suggestions about the "tools" a skeptic should keep ready in their Baloney Detection Kit. Seek independent confirmation of alleged facts. [edit] See also [edit] External links Why People Believe Weird Things and 8 Ways to Change Their Minds [edit]

Excellent thought experiment, akin to Philip Sheperd's book New Self, New World. Thanks for curating/sharing. by mark57g Jun 16

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