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Street art

John Fekner: Broken Promises/Falsas Promesas, South Bronx, 1980. The terms "urban art", "guerrilla art", "post-graffiti" and "neo-graffiti" are also sometimes used when referring to artwork created in these contexts.[1] Traditional spray-painted graffiti artwork itself is often included in this category, excluding territorial graffiti or pure vandalism. Artists who choose the streets as their gallery are often doing so from a preference to communicate directly with the public at large, free from perceived confines of the formal art world.[2] Street artists sometimes present socially relevant content infused with esthetic value, to attract attention to a cause or as a form of "art provocation".[3] Street artists often travel between countries to spread their designs. Some artists have gained cult-followings, media and art world attention, and have gone on to work commercially in the styles which made their work known on the streets. Background[edit] Street art is a topical issue.

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Reclaim the Streets Reclaim the Streets (RTS) is a collective with a shared ideal of community ownership of public spaces. Participants characterize the collective as a resistance movement opposed to the dominance of corporate forces in globalization, and to the car as the dominant mode of transport. §Protests[edit] Arta Lui Santani Chiar daca nu sunt asa de inaintat in varsta, pot sa sustin cu mana pe inima ca jucariile, “de pe vremea mea”, nu aratau asa. Mare pacat. Daca aveti nevoie de ceva care sa va stimuleze imaginatia juniorului chiar va recomand lucrarile lui Santani. Artistul are doar 21 de ani (practic e inca copil) iar “papusile” (daca se pot numi asa) create de el sunt din alta lume. Personajele care prind “viata” in mainile rusului sunt de-a dreptul demonice si dragute in acelasi timp. Look at those eyes.

Seattle Street Art Blek le Rat meets Banksy in the Mission A tipster sent us these pics of the latest addition to the ongoing collaborative mural by Public Works started by Banksy during his 2010 promotional surge through the city. This augmentation was allegedly added by none other than French pioneering stencil artist Blek Le Rat. More pics after the jump. Blek le Rat Xavier Prou (Blek le Rat) at the gallery opening and book signing at the 941 Geary Gallery, San Francisco Blek le Rat, (pronounced: [blɛk lə ʁa]; born Xavier Prou,[1] 1952)[2] was one of the first graffiti artists in Paris, and has been described as the "Father of stencil graffiti".[3] Early life[edit] Xavier Prou was born in Boulogne-Billancourt in the western suburbs of Paris in 1951 or 1952. Early career and influence[edit] The iconic stencils of rats by Blek le Rat

Blek le Rat: This is not a Banksy - Features, Art Now, with auction houses aflutter at the prospect of bagging a work by the elusive Bristolian, and Brad Pitt among those eagerly queuing to pay tens of thousands of pounds for a piece, even the most entrenched critics are being forced to re-evaluate their position on the subject of that formerly dirty word. Late last year a grainy photo of a crouched figure in front of a wall filled news pages and news channels alike, below the headline: "Is This Banksy?" Such is the hype surrounding the shadow that creeps in the night, that Banksy – in his absence – has been crowned the Daddy of anti-Establishment street art. Yet, if Banksy is indeed the Daddy of politically-conscious graffiti, let me introduce the Godfather, Blek Le Rat. The 56-year-old Frenchman was stencilling city walls while Banksy was getting to grips with crayons. Motivated by social consciousness and a desire to bring the art to the people, Blek Le Rat's political agenda is clear.

Massive Art Nouveau-Inspired Mural in Montreal For 16 days straight, from dawn to dusk, five highly determined Montreal-based artists (who make up the artist run collective A'shop) worked on a graffiti mural of a Mother Nature-esque Madonna or a modern-day version of "Our Lady of Grace." Inspired by Czech Art Nouveau painter Alphonse Mucha, the crew created this breathtakingly beautiful five story mural using 500 cans of spray paint in over 50 different colors. “We been doing graffiti for a long time but this is our first large project involving the whole team,” Fluke of A'shop told The Montreal Gazette. “We’re always busy with other projects so we’ve never really had time to let [the reactions to] them sink in.

Best Street Art of 2011 December 27, 2011 | 72 Comments » | Topics: Art, Pics Hot Stories From Around The Web Other Awesome Stories

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