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Polymath

Polymath
Leonardo da Vinci is regarded as a "Renaissance man" and is one of the most recognizable polymaths. A polymath (Greek: πολυμαθής, polymathēs, "having learned much")[1] is a person whose expertise spans a significant number of different subject areas; such a person is known to draw on complex bodies of knowledge to solve specific problems. The term was first used in the seventeenth century but the related term, polyhistor, is an ancient term with similar meaning. The term applies to the gifted people of the Renaissance who sought to develop their abilities in all areas of knowledge as well as in physical development, social accomplishments, and the arts, in contrast to the vast majority of people of that age who were not well educated. This term entered the lexicon during the twentieth century and has now been applied to great thinkers living before and after the Renaissance. Renaissance ideal[edit] Robert A. Related terms[edit] Polymath and polyhistor compared[edit] See also[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polymath

Related:  Design 101Philosophy

Japanese Artist Crafts Furniture That Looks Like Sketches What are these kids doing inside this drawing? A look from another angle reveals that something unusual is going on. It’s not the kids who’ve been flattened to 2D photographs of themselves, it’s the chairs that have been realized as three-dimensional models. These fully functional pieces of furniture, a 2013 thesis project called “Rough Sketch Products” realized by Tokyo University of the Arts student Daigo Fukawa, look like they leapt straight from a napkin – or even someone’s mind – into the three-dimensional world. Though we can’t say how comfortable the seats are (they appear to be made out of wire), the effect is both visually stunning and humorous. It takes very literally the sometimes authoritarian commands of a chicken-scratching designer to his or her more technically skilled underlings.

Philosophy Philosophy is the study of general and fundamental problems, such as those connected with reality, existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.[1][2] Philosophy is distinguished from other ways of addressing such problems by its critical, generally systematic approach and its reliance on rational argument.[3] In more casual speech, by extension, "philosophy" can refer to "the most basic beliefs, concepts, and attitudes of an individual or group".[4] The word "philosophy" comes from the Ancient Greek φιλοσοφία (philosophia), which literally means "love of wisdom".[5][6][7] The introduction of the terms "philosopher" and "philosophy" has been ascribed to the Greek thinker Pythagoras.[8] Areas of inquiry Philosophy is divided into many sub-fields. These include epistemology, logic, metaphysics, ethics, and aesthetics.[9][10] Some of the major areas of study are considered individually below.

Want to Be a Polymath Like da Vinci? Follow These Four Steps This is a guest post by Christopher Hutton of Liter8 Ideas. Polymath (noun) - A person of wide-ranging knowledge or learning. Polymaths aren’t born, they’re made. They are created by way of human patterns and practices that were copied from the years of Da Vinci and Michelangelo. And so, we have an opportunity to perform behaviors that will build us into potential Polymaths. Theory of multiple intelligences The theory of multiple intelligences is a theory of intelligence that differentiates it into specific (primarily sensory) "modalities", rather than seeing intelligence as dominated by a single general ability. This model was proposed by Howard Gardner in his 1983 book Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. Gardner articulated seven criteria for a behavior to be considered an intelligence.[1] These were that the intelligences showed: potential for brain isolation by brain damage, place in evolutionary history, presence of core operations, susceptibility to encoding (symbolic expression), a distinct developmental progression, the existence of savants, prodigies and other exceptional people, and support from experimental psychology and psychometric findings. Gardner argues intelligence is categorized into three primary or overarching categories, those of which are formulated by the abilities.

Conway's Game of Life "Conway game" redirects here. For Conway's surreal number game theory, see surreal number. The Game of Life, also known simply as Life, is a cellular automaton devised by the British mathematician John Horton Conway in 1970.[1] The "game" is a zero-player game, meaning that its evolution is determined by its initial state, requiring no further input. One interacts with the Game of Life by creating an initial configuration and observing how it evolves or, for advanced players, by creating patterns with particular properties.

Jeremy Bentham Jeremy Bentham (/ˈbɛnθəm/; 15 February [O.S. 4 February] 1748 – 6 June 1832) was a British philosopher, jurist, and social reformer. He is regarded as the founder of modern utilitarianism. Bentham became a leading theorist in Anglo-American philosophy of law, and a political radical whose ideas influenced the development of welfarism. He advocated individual and economic freedom, the separation of church and state, freedom of expression, equal rights for women, the right to divorce, and the decriminalising of homosexual acts.[1] He called for the abolition of slavery, the abolition of the death penalty, and the abolition of physical punishment, including that of children.[2] He has also become known in recent years as an early advocate of animal rights.[3] Though strongly in favour of the extension of individual legal rights, he opposed the idea of natural law and natural rights, calling them "nonsense upon stilts".[4] Life[edit] Portrait of Bentham by the studio of Thomas Frye, 1760–1762

In Defense of Polymaths - Kyle Wiens by Kyle Wiens | 8:54 AM May 18, 2012 Polymath is one of those words more likely to show up on the SAT than in everyday conversation. But the reason we don’t use the word much these days has less to do with vocabulary than it has to do with practicality: there aren’t a lot of polymaths around anymore. In case you don’t have your pocket dictionary handy, a polymath is a person with a wide range of knowledge or learning. Multipotentiality Multipotentiality is an educational and psychological term referring to the ability of a person, particularly one of intellectual or artistic curiosity, to excel in two or more different fields.[1] It can also refer to an individual whose interests span multiple fields or areas, rather than being strong in just one. Such individuals are called "multipotentialites." On the contrary, those whose interests lie mostly within a single field are called "specialists." While the term multipotentialite can be used interchangeably with polymath or Renaissance Person, the terms are not identical.

PatternLanguage.com "The process itself is the actuality"Alfred North Whitehead There are no shortcuts to beautiful form. If you stand in front of the faucet of your kitchen sink and look at the beautiful shape of the drop of water you can realize that it forms slowly as gravity works on the tiny bit of water. You can not make that shape mechanically. Nor can we make babies from adding together bits and pieces. Aristotle Aristotle's views on physical science profoundly shaped medieval scholarship. Their influence extended into the Renaissance and were not replaced systematically until the Enlightenment and theories such as classical mechanics. Some of Aristotle's zoological observations, such as on the hectocotyl (reproductive) arm of the octopus, were not confirmed or refuted until the 19th century. His works contain the earliest known formal study of logic, which was incorporated in the late 19th century into modern formal logic. His ethics, though always influential, gained renewed interest with the modern advent of virtue ethics.

Polymath: ‘A Renaissance Man’ Know something about everything and everything about something T H Huxley The only thing that I know is that I know nothing Socrates Definition of polymath: [n] a person of great and varied learning There is an increasing demand for people who can work across boundaries and in many different fields: people who can understand the linkages and connections between the various disciplines of modern life.

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