background preloader

Cosmic Quandaries with Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson

Related:  Time Machine

Philosophy Bro Time warp: Researchers show possibility of cloning quantum information from the past (Phys.org) —Popular television shows such as "Doctor Who" have brought the idea of time travel into the vernacular of popular culture. But problem of time travel is even more complicated than one might think. LSU's Mark Wilde has shown that it would theoretically be possible for time travelers to copy quantum data from the past. It all started when David Deutsch, a pioneer of quantum computing and a physicist at Oxford, came up with a simplified model of time travel to deal with the paradoxes that would occur if one could travel back in time. For example, would it be possible to travel back in time to kill one's grandfather? In the Grandfather paradox, a time traveler faces the problem that if he kills his grandfather back in time, then he himself is never born, and consequently is unable to travel through time to kill his grandfather, and so on. "The question is, how would you have existed in the first place to go back in time and kill your grandfather?"

Khan Academy 10 TED Talks for Entrepreneurs ? The Educated Entrepreneur's Blog A fellow entrepreneur gave me a slight nudge today that motivated me to post today’s blog. I think you will certainly find value in it as it incorporates some of the best minds of the 21st century. Remember….. The secret to learning as an entrepreneur is to mix equal parts of inspiration and perspiration. Hard work without a vision is futile, while a great idea without execution is similarly worthless. In these TED talks, you’ll find the inspiration you need and the know-how to get it done. Seth Godin on Standing Out: What makes you so special? Like this: Like Loading...

A Two-Time Universe? Physicist Explores How Second Dimension of Time Could Unify Physics Laws For a long time, Itzhak Bars has been studying time. More than a decade ago, the USC College physicist began pondering the role time plays in the basic laws of physics — the equations describing matter, gravity and the other forces of nature. Those laws are exquisitely accurate. Einstein mastered gravity with his theory of general relativity, and the equations of quantum theory capture every nuance of matter and other forces, from the attractive power of magnets to the subatomic glue that holds an atom’s nucleus together. But the laws can’t be complete. Bars thinks one of the missing pieces is a hidden dimension of time. Bizarre is not a powerful enough word to describe this idea, but it is a powerful idea nevertheless. Of course, it’s not as simple as that. It sounds like a new episode of “The Twilight Zone,” but it’s a familiar idea to most physicists. Extra space dimensions aren’t easy to imagine — in everyday life, nobody ever notices more than three. Source: USC College

World Game World Game, sometimes called the World Peace Game, is an educational simulation developed by Buckminster Fuller in 1961 to help create solutions to overpopulation and the uneven distribution of global resources. This alternative to war games uses Fuller's Dymaxion map and requires a group of players to cooperatively solve a set of metaphorical scenarios, thus challenging the dominant nation-state perspective with a more wholistic "total world" view. The idea was to "make the world work for 100% of humanity in the shortest possible time through spontaneous cooperation without ecological damage or disadvantage to anyone",[1] thus increasing the quality of life for all people. History and use[edit] Fuller first publicly proposed the concept as the core curriculum at the (then new) Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. In 1980, the World Game Institute and the World Resources Inventory published the World Energy Data Sheet. In 2001, a for-profit educational company named o.s.

Scientists Discover a Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics - Wired Science Physicists reported this week the discovery of a jewel-like geometric object that dramatically simplifies calculations of particle interactions and challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental components of reality. “This is completely new and very much simpler than anything that has been done before,” said Andrew Hodges, a mathematical physicist at Oxford University who has been following the work. The revelation that particle interactions, the most basic events in nature, may be consequences of geometry significantly advances a decades-long effort to reformulate quantum field theory, the body of laws describing elementary particles and their interactions. Interactions that were previously calculated with mathematical formulas thousands of terms long can now be described by computing the volume of the corresponding jewel-like “amplituhedron,” which yields an equivalent one-term expression. The amplituhedron itself does not describe gravity.

Jennifer Government: NationStates Photons detected without being destroyed iStock/THINKSTOCK Measuring the properties of photons usually involves absorbing them, but a new device detects their passage and lets them fly by. One of the cornerstones of quantum theory is the principle that you cannot measure any property of an object without affecting the object itself. Indeed, detecting the very existence of a photon until now has usually meant destroying it. Physicists, however, have now devised a way to detect single photons of visible light without bringing about their demise. Others had done the same with microwave photons, but this is the first time that it has been done in the part of the spectrum that could matter for a future 'quantum Internet'. The conventional way to detect a single particle of light is to catch it with a sensor, absorbing its energy but destroying the particle in the process. When the team fired a photon at the cavity, the atom’s dual personality caused two things to happen at once.

John Conway's Game of Life The Game The Game of Life is not your typical computer game. It is a 'cellular automaton', and was invented by Cambridge mathematician John Conway. This game became widely known when it was mentioned in an article published by Scientific American in 1970. It consists of a collection of cells which, based on a few mathematical rules, can live, die or multiply. Depending on the initial conditions, the cells form various patterns throughout the course of the game. The Simulation The Rules For a space that is 'populated': Each cell with one or no neighbors dies, as if by solitude. Each cell with four or more neighbors dies, as if by overpopulation. Each cell with two or three neighbors survives. For a space that is 'empty' or 'unpopulated' Each cell with three neighbors becomes populated. The Controls Choose a figure from the pull-down menu or make one yourself by clicking on the cells with a mouse. Java version This page initially contained a Java applet and a Java application you can download.

Spooky Physics Phenomenon May Link Universe's Wormholes Wormholes — shortcuts that in theory can connect distant points in the universe — might be linked with the spooky phenomenon of quantum entanglement, where the behavior of particles can be connected regardless of distance, researchers say. These findings could help scientists explain the universe from its very smallest to its biggest scales. Scientists have long sought to develop a theory that can describe how the cosmos works in its entirety. One prediction of the theory of general relativity devised by Einstein involves wormholes, formally known as Einstein-Rosen bridges. Intriguingly, quantum mechanics also has a phenomenon that can link objects such as electrons regardless of how far apart they are — quantum entanglement. "This is true even when the electrons are light years apart," saidKristan Jensen, a theoretical physicist at Stony Brook University in New York. Einstein derisively called this seemingly impossible connection "spooky action at a distance." Entanglement and wormholes

s "The Reference Desk" - Business, Math, Science, Engineering, Technology, Language, Medical, Veterinary, Livestock, Gardening, Photography, Music, Recipes, etc. In a "Rainbow" Universe Time May Have No Beginning What if the universe had no beginning, and time stretched back infinitely without a big bang to start things off? That's one possible consequence of an idea called "rainbow gravity," so-named because it posits that gravity's effects on spacetime are felt differently by different wavelengths of light, aka different colors in the rainbow. Rainbow gravity was first proposed 10 years ago as a possible step toward repairing the rifts between the theories of general relativity (covering the very big) and quantum mechanics (concerning the realm of the very small). The idea is not a complete theory for describing quantum effects on gravity, and is not widely accepted. Nevertheless, physicists have now applied the concept to the question of how the universe began, and found that if rainbow gravity is correct, spacetime may have a drastically different origin story than the widely accepted picture of the big bang. Yet the concept has its critics.

500 Free Online Courses from Top Universities Get 1,300 free online courses from the world's leading universities -- Stanford, Yale, MIT, Harvard, Berkeley, Oxford and more. You can download these audio & video courses (often from iTunes, YouTube, or university web sites) straight to your computer or mp3 player. Over 45,000 hours of free audio & video lectures, await you now. Humanities & Social Sciences Art & Art History Courses Classics Courses Classical Mythology - Free iTunes Video - Joseph Hughes, Missouri StateClassical Mythology - Free iTunes Audio - Rhiannon Evans, La Trobe University -AustraliaConcepts of the Hero in Greek Civilization - Free Online Course - Greg Nagy, HarvardEpics of Rome - Free iTunes Video - Rhiannon Evans, LaTrobe University-AustraliaHannibal - Free iTunes Audio - Patrick Hunt, StanfordRoman Architecture - Free Online Course - Diana E. Economics Courses Bookmark our collection of free online courses in Economics. Film Courses Food Courses Geography Courses Language Lessons Law Courses Literature Courses

Related: