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The Confidence Gap

The Confidence Gap
For years, we women have kept our heads down and played by the rules. We’ve been certain that with enough hard work, our natural talents would be recognized and rewarded. We’ve made undeniable progress. In the United States, women now earn more college and graduate degrees than men do. We make up half the workforce, and we are closing the gap in middle management. Half a dozen global studies, conducted by the likes of Goldman Sachs and Columbia University, have found that companies employing women in large numbers outperform their competitors on every measure of profitability. And yet, as we’ve worked, ever diligent, the men around us have continued to get promoted faster and be paid more. Some observers say children change our priorities, and there is some truth in this claim. The elusive nature of confidence has intrigued us ever since we started work on our 2009 book, Womenomics, which looked at the many positive changes unfolding for women. We know the feeling firsthand.

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2014/05/the-confidence-gap/359815/

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