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Stephen Wiltshire

Related:  Genius

School & Experts Put Genius Boy In Special Ed. Now He’s Free & On Track For Nobel Prize A young genius whose IQ is said said to be higher than Albert Einstein, is on his way to possibly winning a Nobel Prize after dropping out of elementary school and his special ed programs. From a young age, Jacob Barnett was very interested in Math and Physics. Numbers were his passion and he was getting bored of early grades of elementary school as they did not come close to challenging him. Finally, his parents made the decision to take him out of public school and special ed programs regardless of the fact doctors had diagnosed him with ASD. “For a parent, it’s terrifying to fly against the advice of the professionals. Jacob’s incredible memory and mind allowed him to attend university classes after he taught himself all of high school math in just two weeks.He is currently on track to graduate from college by the age of 14 and it is believed his research into math and physics may begin to challenge some of the established theories in physics. Source:

From head injury to math genius: On savant syndrome and the possibility of a ‘little Rain Man within us all’ Being knocked unconscious might change any one of us. It might affect us physically, causing double vision or headaches, or mentally, making us fearful or even grumpy. But few could dream of the altered state Jason Padgett found himself in, after just such an injury — caused in his case by a blow to the head during a late-night mugging outside a karaoke bar in 2002. For Jason, a father-of-one from Tacoma, in Washington State, the effect of his injury was remarkable, very rare — and strangely fortunate. From college drop-out with a dodgy hair cut — interested in little more than drinking, racing cars and going to the gym — Jason, now 43, woke up the day after he was attacked with an extraordinary ability in mathematics and geometry. His vision had changed: It was somehow sharper and more comprehensive than before. “At first, I was startled, and worried for myself, but it was so beautiful that I just stood in my slippers and stared,” he told the New York Post. “That’s it! He is not alone.

If You Think You’re a Genius, You’re Crazy - Issue 18: Genius When John Forbes Nash, the Nobel Prize-winning mathematician, schizophrenic, and paranoid delusional, was asked how he could believe that space aliens had recruited him to save the world, he gave a simple response. “Because the ideas I had about supernatural beings came to me the same way that my mathematical ideas did. So I took them seriously.” Nash is hardly the only so-called mad genius in history. Instances such as these have led many to suppose that creativity and psychopathology are intimately related. The most important process underlying strokes of creative genius is the tendency to pay attention to things that normally should be ignored or filtered out. Opponents of the mad genius idea can also point to two solid facts. So should we believe that creative genius is connected with madness or not? Cognitive disinhibition proves no less beneficial in the arts than in the sciences. Exceptional intelligence alone yields useful but unoriginal and unsurprising ideas. References 1. 2. 3.

Super-Intelligent Humans Are Coming - Issue 18: Genius Lev Landau, a Nobelist and one of the fathers of a great school of Soviet physics, had a logarithmic scale for ranking theorists, from 1 to 5. A physicist in the first class had ten times the impact of someone in the second class, and so on. He modestly ranked himself as 2.5 until late in life, when he became a 2. In the first class were Heisenberg, Bohr, and Dirac among a few others. Einstein was a 0.5! My friends in the humanities, or other areas of science like biology, are astonished and disturbed that physicists and mathematicians (substitute the polymathic von Neumann for Einstein) might think in this essentially hierarchical way. I have even come to believe that Landau’s scale could, in principle, be extended well below Einstein’s 0.5. In Daniel Keyes’ novel Flowers for Algernon, a mentally challenged adult called Charlie Gordon receives an experimental treatment to raise his IQ from 60 to somewhere in the neighborhood of 200. Also in Genetics Does Stress Speed Up Evolution?

Super-Intelligent Humans Are Coming - Issue 34: Adaptation Lev Landau, a Nobelist and one of the fathers of a great school of Soviet physics, had a logarithmic scale for ranking theorists, from 1 to 5. A physicist in the first class had ten times the impact of someone in the second class, and so on. He modestly ranked himself as 2.5 until late in life, when he became a 2. In the first class were Heisenberg, Bohr, and Dirac among a few others. My friends in the humanities, or other areas of science like biology, are astonished and disturbed that physicists and mathematicians (substitute the polymathic von Neumann for Einstein) might think in this essentially hierarchical way. I have even come to believe that Landau’s scale could, in principle, be extended well below Einstein’s 0.5. In Daniel Keyes’ novel Flowers for Algernon, a mentally challenged adult called Charlie Gordon receives an experimental treatment to raise his IQ from 60 to somewhere in the neighborhood of 200. Each genetic variant slightly increases or decreases cognitive ability.

How to raise a genius: lessons from a 45-year study of super-smart children Illustration by Vasava On a summer day in 1968, professor Julian Stanley met a brilliant but bored 12-year-old named Joseph Bates. The Baltimore student was so far ahead of his classmates in mathematics that his parents had arranged for him to take a computer-science course at Johns Hopkins University, where Stanley taught. Unsure of what to do with Bates, his computer instructor introduced him to Stanley, a researcher well known for his work in psychometrics — the study of cognitive performance. Bates's score was well above the threshold for admission to Johns Hopkins, and prompted Stanley to search for a local high school that would let the child take advanced mathematics and science classes. Stanley would affectionately refer to Bates as “student zero” of his Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY), which would transform how gifted children are identified and supported by the US education system. Source: K. Start of a study Nurturing a talented child Spatial skills

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