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Metatron

Metatron
Origins[edit] The identification of Metatron with Enoch is not explicitly made in the Talmud although it does reference a Prince of the World who was young but now is old. However, some of the earliest kabbalists assumed the connection. There also seems to be two Metatrons, one spelled with six letters (מטטרון), and one spelled with seven (מיטטרון). The former may be the transformed Enoch, Prince of the Countenance within the divine palace; the latter, the Primordial Metatron, an emanation of the "Cause of Causes", specifically the tenth and last emanation, identified with the earthly Divine Presence.[6] Furthermore, the Merkabah text Re’ uyot Yehezkel identifies the Ancient of Days from Daniel as Metatron.[5] Talmud[edit] The Talmud states, it was proved to Elisha that Metatron could not be a second deity by the fact that Metatron received 60 "strokes with fiery rods" to demonstrate that Metatron was not a god, but an angel, and could be punished.[5] Etymology[edit] See also[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metatron

Related:  Angels and DemonsSacred Geometry

Satan Satan (Hebrew: שָּׂטָן satan, "adversary,"[1]) is a term, later a character appearing in the texts of the Abrahamic religions[2][3] who personifies evil and temptation, and is known as the deceiver that leads humanity astray. The term is often applied to an angel who fell out of favor with God, seducing humanity into the ways of sin, and who now rules over the fallen world. Satan is primarily understood as an "accuser" or "adversary" in the Hebrew Bible, and is not necessarily the personification of evil that he would become in later Abrahamic religions. In the New Testament, Satan is a name that refers to a decidedly malevolent entity (devil) who possesses demonic god-like qualities. In Theistic Satanism, Satan is considered a positive force and deity who is either worshipped or revered. In LaVeyan Satanism, Satan is regarded as holding virtuous characteristics.[4][5]

Chapter 14 The Irrationals Selections from Julia E. Diggins, String, Straightedge, and Shadow Viking Press, New York , 1965. (Illustrations by Corydon Bell) Before the Secret Brotherhood was disbanded, its members really thought they had grasped the key to the cosmos. Then everything collapsed. Demon In Ancient Near Eastern religions as well as in the Abrahamic traditions, including ancient and medieval Christian demonology, a demon is considered an unclean spirit, sometimes a fallen angel, the spirit of a deceased human, or a spirit of unknown type which may cause demonic possession, calling for an exorcism. In Western occultism and Renaissance magic, which grew out of an amalgamation of Greco-Roman magic, Jewish demonology and Christian tradition,[2] a demon is a spiritual entity that may be conjured and controlled. Terminology[edit] The Greek term does not have any connotations of evil or malevolence. In fact, εὐδαιμονία eudaimonia, (literally good-spiritedness) means happiness. The supposed existence of demons remains an important concept in many modern religions and occultist traditions.

CG: Introduction to Sacred Geometry: Text, Mandalas and Vidio plus free graphics The First Archetypes of Sacred Geometry Fig. 1 The Single Point Fig. 2 The Two Points Fig. 3 Archdemon In Biblical tradition, an archdemon (also spelled archdaemon) is a spiritual entity, prominent in the infernal hierarchy as a leader of the infernal host.[1] Essentially, the archdemons is the counterpart of the archangels. Archdemons are described as the leaders of demonic hosts, just as archangels lead choirs of angels. In the Occult tradition, there is controversy regarding which demons should be classed as archdemons. During different ages, some demons were historically 'promoted' to archdemons, others were completely forgotten, and new ones were created. In ancient Jewish lore, pagan gods of neighboring cultures were classed as extremely pernicious in order to protect Jews from worshiping them; therefore, Ba'al and Astarte were among the worst enemies of God. During the Middle Ages these characterizations were no longer important, but still persisted.

Human Form From Sacred Geometry New Discoveries Linking The Great Pyramid to the Human Form Copyright 1997 - 2000 CHARLES R. HENRY All Rights Reserved Watcher (angel) Watching angel on the spire of St Michael's church, Clifton Hampden, Oxfordshire, England In the Book of Daniel 4:13, 17, 23[4] there are three references to the class of "watcher, holy one" (watcher, Aramaic `iyr; holy one, Aramaic qaddiysh). The term is introduced by Nebuchadnezzar who says he saw "a watcher, a holy one come down (singular verb) from heaven." He describes how in his dream the watcher says that Nebuchadnezzar will eat grass and be mad and that this punishment is "by the decree of the Watchers, the demand by the word of the Holy Ones" - "the living may know that the Most High rules in the kingdom of men." After hearing the king's dream Daniel considers for an hour and then responds:

The Platonic Solids and Sacred Geometry Sacred geometry is a term which describes ... The geometrical laws which create everything in existence. This term has been used by mathematicians, geometricians, spiritual seekers, anthropologists, and archaeologists to encompass the religious, philosophical, and spiritual beliefs that have sprung up around geometry in all the major cultures during the course of human history. Every thought or emotion we produce has a specific geometrical pattern. The more we evolve spiritually the more we see the connection between human evolution and sacred geometry.

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