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A resource for increasing your capacity for happiness through simple exercises

A resource for increasing your capacity for happiness through simple exercises
Related:  Happiness

Positive Psychology Exercises Mental health is the true concern of psychology. But how can one's health be judged? If a person does not have any mental illnesses, but is still not happy, should he/she see a psychologist? And what technique should be used for treatment? The answer is positive psychology, a recent psychological approach, with an emphasis on happiness and self contentment. While traditional psychology focuses on mental illness and unhappiness, positive psychology focuses on how common people can become happier and more content. Where and Why is Positive Psychology Used? Positivism can be used in clinical psychology, by encouraging focus on both positive and negative functioning, when understanding distress. Positive Psychology Exercises Keep a Treasure Chest: Store happy memories in a box or album. Be Unique and Show It: Revel in your individuality. How Social Are You: Do a pleasurable activity like gardening or writing, and do it alone to completion. Positive psychology is not without its critics.

Positive Psychology Exercises The Untapped Powers of the Smile By: Ron Gutman, founder and CEO of HealthTap Recently I made an interesting discovery while running – a simple act that made a dramatic difference and helped carry me through the most challenging segments of long distance runs: smiling. This inspired me to embark on a journey that took me through neuroscience, anthropology, sociology and psychology to uncover the untapped powers of the smile. I started my exploratory journey in California, with an intriguing UC Berkeley 30-year longitudinal study that examined the smiles of students in an old yearbook, and measured their well-being and success throughout their lives.[1] By measuring the smiles in the photographs the researchers were able to predict: how fulfilling and long lasting their marriages would be, how highly they would score on standardized tests of well-being and general happiness, and how inspiring they would be to others. A smile is also one of the most basic, biologically uniform expressions of all humans. Why?

Positive Psychology Exercises for Life Happiness: Psychology Studies to Improve Relationships and Bring Happiness Five easy positive psychology exercises can help you improve your relationship and be happier. Each of these exercises, resulting from psychology studies, offer the benefits of greater happiness, contentment, and life satisfaction. AutonomyExpress your individuality The more autonomy and freedom of choice in your life, the happier you are. Look for opportunities in your daily life, at work and home, to express your free choice and independence. Organize your space.Devote some time to activities you enjoy Bad Feelings Fade Positive psychology researcher Dan Gilbert finds that people systematically over-estimate the duration of their feelings about both positive and negative future events. The future isn't as bright as you hope nor as dim as you fear.Adjust your expectations accordingly. Fun and Philanthropy Psychology studies show that an orientation to the welfare of others is, in the long run, more satisfying than an orientation to one's own pleasure. Gratitude Letter Happy Relationships

Positive Psychology Exercise - Emoclear Self-Helpapedia Emoclear Positve Psychology Exercise I: Doing Pleasurable, Important, and Meaningful Activities Every day for two weeks do the following: 1. Choose a pleasurable activity to do alone and do it to completion. Example: Gardening or writing.2. Choose a pleasurable activity to do with others and do it until completion. Emoclear Positive Psychology Exercise II: Building Character. Based on Character Strengths (Peterson & Seligman, 2004). For two weeks pick two activities per day from the list below. The Activity List: 1. Here's a reflection exercise for accessing appreciation and gratitude: This exercise is to be done daily for two weeks. 1. Have fun, Steve Feature Story: Writing to Heal: Research shows writing about emotional experiences can have tangible health benefits For nearly 20 years, Dr. James W. Pennebaker has been giving people an assignment: write down your deepest feelings about an emotional upheaval in your life for 15 or 20 minutes a day for four consecutive days. Many of those who followed his simple instructions have found their immune systems strengthened. Others have seen their grades improved. Pennebaker, a professor in the Department of Psychology at The University of Texas at Austin and author of several books, including “Opening Up” and “Writing to Heal,” is a pioneer in the study of using expressive writing as a route to healing. “When people are given the opportunity to write about emotional upheavals, they often experience improved health,” Pennebaker says. In his early research Pennebaker was interested in how people who have powerful secrets are more prone to a variety of health problems. It turned out that often they would, and that it wasn’t even necessary for people to tell their secrets to someone else. Photo of Dr.

Five Ways to Become Happier Today | Tal Ben-Shahar Transcript Question: What can people do each day to be happier? Tal Ben-Shahar: The first thing to do to become happier, paradoxically, is to accept painful emotions, to accept them as a part of being alive. You know, there are two kinds of people who don't experience painful emotions such as anxiety or disappointment, sadness, envy; two kinds of people who don't experience these painful emotions. They are the psychopaths and the dead. Question: Are there specific things people can do? Tal Ben-Shahar: Then I think -- yeah. Physical exercise contributes a great deal to happiness; in fact, there is research showing that regular exercise, three times a week for 30 to 40 minutes of aerobic exercise, could be jogging or walking or aerobics or dancing, three times a week of 30 to 40 minutes of exercise is equivalent to some of our most powerful psychiatric drugs in dealing with depression or sadness or anxiety. Question: How can we cultivate gratitude? Tal Ben-Shahar: Okay.

9 Surprising and Intriguing Brain Exercises Every Wednesday is Tip Day. This Wednesday: 9 mental exercises — zany but productive. Dorothea Brande was an American writer and editor, well known for her books Wake Up and Live and Becoming a Writer (a useful resource for writers, by the way). In 1936, in Wake Up and Live, Brande suggests several mental exercises to make your mind keener and more flexible. These exercises are meant to pull you out of your usual habits, give your a different perspective, and put you in situations that will demand resourcefulness and creative problem-solving. Brande argues that only by testing and stretching yourself can you develop mental strength. Even apart from the goals of creativity and mental flexibility, Brande’s exercises make sense from a happiness perspective. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Doing this kind of exercise can seem artificial, but it can also be a fun way to put a little challenge into your ordinary routine.

MoodGYM: Frequently Asked Questions What is MoodGYM? MoodGYM is an innovative, interactive web program designed to prevent depression. It consists of five modules, an interactive game, anxiety and depression assessments, downloadable relaxation audio, a workbook and feedback assessment. Using flashed diagrams and online exercises, MoodGYM teaches the principles of cognitive behaviour therapy – a proven treatment for depression. It also demonstrates the relationship between thoughts and emotions, and works through dealing with stress and relationship break-ups, as well as teaching relaxation and meditation techniques. Who is behind MoodGYM? MoodGYM was designed and developed by staff at the National Institute for Mental Health Research at The Australian National University, in collaboration with other researchers, mental health experts, web and graphic designers, and software engineers." The Norwegian translation of MoodGYM was contributed by the University of Tromso, Norway. Why was MoodGYM created? Will MoodGYM help me?

Mindfulness (psychology) Mindfulness as a psychological concept is the focusing of attention and awareness, based on the concept of mindfulness in Buddhist meditation.[1] It has been popularised in the West by Jon Kabat-Zinn.[2] Despite its roots in Buddhism, mindfulness is often taught independently of religion.[3][4] Clinical psychology and psychiatry since the 1970s have developed a number of therapeutic applications based on mindfulness for helping people suffering from a variety of psychological conditions.[5] Several definitions of mindfulness have been used in modern psychology. According to various prominent psychological definitions, Mindfulness refers to a psychological quality that involves bringing one’s complete attention to the present experience on a moment-to-moment basis,[6] or involves paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally,[6] Bishop, Lau, and colleagues (2004)[8] offered a two-component model of mindfulness:

30 Things to Stop Doing to Yourself When you stop chasing the wrong things you give the right things a chance to catch you. As Maria Robinson once said, “Nobody can go back and start a new beginning, but anyone can start today and make a new ending.” Nothing could be closer to the truth. Here are some ideas to get you started: Stop spending time with the wrong people. – Life is too short to spend time with people who suck the happiness out of you. Update: Read our follow-up to this post: 30 Things to Start Doing for Yourself Photo by: Rob Brucker

How to buy happiness Authors: People fantasize about going on a buying spree if they win lotteryThe reality is that buying more stuff doesn't maximize happinessTheir research shows that giving things to others is more likely to make us happy Editor's note: Michael Norton is an associate professor at Harvard Business School. Elizabeth Dunn is a professor at the University of British Columbia. They are co-authors of the forthcoming book, "Happy Money: The Science of Spending" (Simon & Schuster). Norton spoke at TEDxCambridge. (CNN) -- What would you do if the world handed you a million dollars right now? Our guess is that many of the first things that come to mind involve driving to a store, or going online, and buying stuff. There's nothing wrong with buying things for yourself. Michael Norton Elizabeth Dunn But there's a solution: Give it away. TED.com: The antidote to apathy Our research conducted over the last decade suggests that you should listen more closely, and more often, to that little voice.

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