background preloader

Writers Workshop

Writers Workshop
Teaching writers workshop is a beautiful and amazing thing because it allows our own creativity to flow out on to paper for our student’s to see. Watch me model a lesson. :) I used to be scared to death of teaching writing. I was caught in a world of prompts, forced topics and “journals”. At the time I didn’t realize that this wasn’t building authors, I just knew that there was pencil put to paper, so I thought I was fine. In the past year I was introduced to “crafts”. I was in love with writing. Writer’s Workshop now is a joyous and electrifying time in my teaching day. So, where do you begin? Well, you need to learn the basic outline for Writer’s Workshop. Let’s go through step by step with one of my favorite books The Very Lazy Ladybug. With The Very Lazy Ladybug , a great first lesson is on “word wrapping”. As you can see from the title of the book, the words “wrap” around the pictures. Now that you’re ready to begin, you have your book and craft picked out, it’s time to start. Related:  dianemarycowan3

The Internet Writing Workshop: Write - Critique - Learn I Keep a Writer's Notebook alongside my Students. Do you? I began requiring journal writing way back in 1990--my first year of teaching. I had taken a methods class at my university that stressed the importance of having students keep journals to record daily responses to topics. I said, "Why not?" and every student from day one maintained a spiral-bound "journal" for me. In the spring of 1998, thanks to my high school journalism students' hard work, I was awarded with a month-long, summer fellowship from C-SPAN in Washington, D.C., and the first thing the wonderful folks at C-SPAN asked me to do upon arrival was to keep a daily journal that documented my experience there. When I returned to my classroom in August of 1998, I showed and shared entries from my summer journal every day during that first month of school. Over the next dozen years that followed that trip to D.C., I slowly improved my ability to inspire my students with the daily writing expectations. I have to be doing something right.

Writer's Workshop Resources and Ideas The majority of time of Writing Workshop is devoted to independent writing. During this time, students are prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing their pieces. Depending on the age and abilities of your students, independent writing can be as short as 15 minutes or as long as 45-60 minutes. It helps to build stamina with your class, beginning with a short amount of time and building that time until they can work for up 30 minutes or more. According to Katie Wood Ray (The Writing Workshop, 2001), students can also do other activities during their writing time, such as writing in their schema notebooks journal writing writing exercises to experiment with language and style conducting peer-conferences reading to support writing During independent writing time, the teacher confers with students about their writing. Teachers should keep conferences short. Websites on Conferring:

Writing Objectives Using Bloom's Taxonomy | Center for Teaching & Learning Various researchers have summarized how to use Bloom’s Taxonomy. Following are four interpretations that you can use as guides in helping to write objectives using Bloom’s Taxonomy. From: KC Metro [old link, no longer functioning?] Bloom’s Taxonomy divides the way people learn into three domains. One of these is the cognitive domain, which emphasizes intellectual outcomes. This domain is further divided into categories or levels. From: UMUC From: Stewards Task Oriented Question Construction Wheel Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy Task Oriented Question Construction Wheel Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy. ©2001 St. From: GA Tech According to Benjamin Bloom, and his colleagues, there are six levels of cognition: Ideally, each of these levels should be covered in each course and, thus, at least one objective should be written for each level. Below are examples of objectives written for each level of Bloom’s Taxonomy and activities and assessment tools based on those objectives.

50 of the Best Websites for Writers There are tons of reference sites on the web that can help you find a job or write a poem, essay or story. Here is a list of the best 50 websites for writers. Reference Websites Merriam-Webster Online - Merriam Webster is the perfect place to look up words and find information. The site offers a dictionary, thesaurus, encyclopedia, podcasts, word games and a lot of other things that may be of interest to writers and word-lovers. Bartleby - This site is good if you need a quote or if you want free access to encyclopedias, dictionaries, thesauri, and other reference books. General Writing Websites Writer's Digest - Probably one of the best all-around websites for writers, Writer's Digest offers information on writing better and getting published. Fiction Writing Websites About.com - About.com publishes a Guide to Fiction Writing with general information about fiction writing and a number of community forums for both current and aspiring writers. Nonfiction Writing Websites

The Ultimate Guide to Writing Better Than You Normally Do. Writing is a muscle. Smaller than a hamstring and slightly bigger than a bicep, and it needs to be exercised to get stronger. Think of your words as reps, your paragraphs as sets, your pages as daily workouts. Procrastination is an alluring siren taunting you to google the country where Balki from Perfect Strangers was from, and to arrange sticky notes on your dog in the shape of hilarious dog shorts. The blank white page. Mark Twain once said, “Show, don’t tell.” Finding a really good muse these days isn’t easy, so plan on going through quite a few before landing on a winner. There are two things more difficult than writing. It’s so easy to hide in your little bubble, typing your little words with your little fingers on your little laptop from the comfort of your tiny chair in your miniature little house. It’s no secret that great writers are great readers, and that if you can’t read, your writing will often suffer. Available in print withThe Best of McSweeney’s Internet Tendency

Stunning Landscapes Around the World 10 Ships with Unusual Large Cargo Heavy lift vessels are quite amazing vessels, built to load, carry and discharge large, unusual shaped cargoes (or even smaller vessels) that will simply not fit inside the holds of conventional vessels. Unusual cargoes can include power plants, submarines, desalination units,oil platform, generators and yachts. Continue reading Top 10 Weirdest Places Around the World Did you know there is a cinema in the middle of the desert? Continue reading Breathtaking Libraries Around the World Everyone has some kind of place that makes them feel transported to a magical realm. Continue reading 9 Cool Gadgets That Everyone Wants to Have at Home From a secret agent-like popup garage to a Lego wall, take a look at these 9 things you definitely want in your home. Continue reading 6 Wicked Beach Sculptures Placed Just To Scare You Continue reading Strangest Graveyards Around the World From a Phone booth graveyardto the Coke machine graveyard. Continue reading

List of Latin phrases (full) This page lists direct English translations of common Latin phrases. Some of the phrases are themselves translations of Greek phrases, as Greek rhetoric and literature reached its peak centuries before that of ancient Rome. This list is a combination of the twenty divided "List of Latin phrases" pages, for users who have no trouble loading large pages and prefer a single page to scroll or search through. The content of the list cannot be edited here, and is kept automatically in sync with the separate lists through the use of transclusion.

MOODY WRITING Political Writing Say you are a young person beginning to write about politics and policy. You probably have some idea of what you believe, but have you thought about how you believe it? That is, have you thought about where you will sit on the continuum that stretches from writers who are engaged to those who are detached? Writers who are at the classic engaged position believe that social change is usually initiated by political parties. To have the most influence, the engaged writer wants to channel his efforts through a party. The engaged writer closely and intimately aligns with a team. The engaged writer often criticizes his own party, but from a zone of trust inside it, and he is usually advising the party to return to its core creed. The detached writer also starts with a philosophic world view. But the detached writer wants to be a few steps away from the partisans. The detached writer believes that writing is more like teaching than activism. Brooks is a columnist for the New York Times.

Related: