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Audio Geek Zine

Audio Geek Zine

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Home Studio Corner Have you ever tried to get a nine month old dressed? It’s almost impossible. As you may recall, my wife and I have a three year old boy and twin nine month old girls. It has been a few years since I had to dress a toddler, and it can be so frustrating. The most frustrating part? D-type Flip Flop Counter or Delay Flip-flop But in order to prevent this from happening an inverter can be connected between the “SET” and the “RESET” inputs to produce another type of flip flop circuit known as a Data Latch, Delay flip flop, D-type Bistable, D-type Flip Flop or just simply a D Flip Flop as it is more generally called. The D Flip Flop is by far the most important of the clocked flip-flops as it ensures that ensures that inputs S and R are never equal to one at the same time. The D-type flip flop are constructed from a gated SR flip-flop with an inverter added between the S and the R inputs to allow for a single D (data) input. Then this single data input, labelled D, is used in place of the “set” signal, and the inverter is used to generate the complementary “reset” input thereby making a level-sensitive D-type flip-flop from a level-sensitive RS-latch as now S = D and R = not D as shown.

Music of Sound I’ve had three different threads of ideas crossover in different ways today – all related, but from different angles… In reverse order, this from Marc at Disquiet made me smile: I’m very sure you could do the exact same with film scores – in fact it is the curse of the temp score. With the film I recently scored, One Thousand Ropes, I was blessed that the director did not want a temp score at all – he was happy to edit without music until such time as original music was available. Understanding Sends, Auxes And Buses « Audio Geek Zine Let’s talk about using sends to control effects, parallel processing and some of the other benefits of sends. First we need to understand a few concepts. Buses, auxes and sends. What is a Bus? RA - Tech A master of sound shows us how he tinkers. The app reconfigures the functionality of Native Instruments iPad DJ app for smaller touchscreens. Mon, 29 Apr 2013 / HerrJordan 2 Comments The veteran producer and engineer talks to Music Radar about his approach to the dark art of audio mastering. Left, right and everywhere in between: RA's Jono Buchanan explains how to find space for your sounds. RA's Jordan Rothlein spent a few days in Frankfurt surveying the sights and sounds at Europe's annual music technology showcase.

Interfacing with a DAC (Digital/Analog Converter) for Sound Synthesis with the Netduino In previous two posts, I created a midi interface for the Netduino. For kicks, here's what it looks like soldered rather than on the breadboard (and beside it, a shot of the disaster my desk has become during this project. There's actually a Commodore 128 in the rubble to the right): Gladly, I've since cleaned that up. :) The two posts covering the MIDI interface are: When tackling something new, I try and individually prototype the key parts. Mysteries Of Metering Technique : Theory + Technical All mechanical meters are VU meters, all bargraph meters read peak levels -- and both types will give the same reading if you feed in a test tone. Reasonable enough assumptions, but wrong on all counts, as PAUL WHITE explains. The really wonderful thing about standards is that there are so many of them, and nowhere is this more evident than when you look at metering. This article examines the complicated issue of metering standards, but those unfamiliar with the general terminology of metering (eg. dBu, dbv, and the conventions of 'plus 4' and 'minus 10' operation) are advised to check out my article from SOS February 1994, 'dBs Explained', which should clarify many of the terms used here. Tape machines have meters, mixers have meters and signal processors have meters, but what do they actually tell you?

Compressor control principles A short compendium on digital audio compression techniques. Basic compressor configurations Compression vs. limiting Making waves – Open Music Labs’ DSP Shield – Arduino – freeRTOS There’s a great new Arduino Uno (pre-R3) Shield available from Open Music Labs. Their Audio Codec Shield is an Arduino shield that uses the Wolfson WM8731 codec. It is capable of sampling and reproducing audio up to 88kHz, 24bit stereo, but for use with the Arduino it is practically limited to 44kHz, 16bit stereo. The Audio Codec Shield has 1/8″ stereo input and headphone output jacks, a single pole analogue input aliasing filter, and 2 potentiometer for varying parameters in the program on the fly.

EQ Drums One of the things I love most about recording music is that there are no rules. One guy decides to use a cardboard box as his kick drum sound…and it sounds awesome. Another guy decides to sample in the sound of a screaming cat and blend it with the cymbals. (Okay, I’ve never seen that, but I bet it’s awesome.) You’re free to do whatever you want.

In The Studio: Recording The Bass Amp Today everyone is conditioned to go direct with the bass guitar that many times miking a bass amp is completely overlooked. That’s too bad because it can bring something to the track that you just can’t get any other way. Here’s an excerpt from my Audio Recording Basic Training book that provides an exercise for bass amp miking. Back in the 60s and 70s, the way engineers recorded the electric bass was by miking the bass amp. As direct boxes became more and more available, the trend eventually swung the other way, with most bass recording done direct.

Recording Impulse Responses With growing computing power over the last decade, convolution plugins have become commonplace. Some of the most common ones include Audio Ease Altiverb, Logic’s Space Designer, Avid TL Space, Waves IR-1 and McDsp Revolver. They are usually packaged with large and useful libraries of impulse responses (more on what all this means below), but what makes them really powerful is the fact that it is quite easy to record and use your own impulse responses. This not only helps ‘personalise’ your mixes, but is extremely useful in post-production and in the design of new sounds. Each of the above mentioned plugins need slightly different techniques for creating a custom library of impulse responses. How Can I Set Up a Home Recording Studio on the Cheap? also, keep in mind that not everyone needs an audio interface. if you are only recording one track at a time or are recording more than one track but are fine with mixing it as you record you can use a much cheaper and oodles simpler analog mixing board/mixer. i struggled for over a year with a USB audio interface box i bought for home recording and it was ALWAYS a hassle - either really high latency, dropped sections, or it would take 15-20 minutes of fiddling with system prefs and settings in software to get it to work right. i finally went to my local music store and picked up a behringer analog mixer for $49 which has 8-Inputs (2 mic, 2 stereo, 1 stereo tape/CD), builtin EQ, effects send/receive, and the mic jacks have phantom power and the line inputs work great for electric instruments, a headphone out and I use an RCA-to-mini-1/8th-stereo plug to connect directly into the mic jack on my mac mini. It's simple, always works, and has real knobs and buttons.

Algorithmic symphonies from one line of code Lately, there has been a lot of experimentation with very short programs that synthesize something that sounds like music. I now want to share some information and thoughts about these experiments. First, some background. On 2011-09-26, I released the following video on Youtube, presenting seven programs and their musical output:

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