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British English and American English

British English and American English
British English and American English British people and American people can always understand each other – but there are a few notable differences between British English and American English Grammar Americans use the present perfect tense less than speakers of British English and a British teacher might mark wrong some things that an American teacher would say are correct. US Did you do your homework yet? Brit. In British English, ‘have got’ is often used for the possessive sense of ‘have’ and ‘have got to’ is informally used for ‘have to’. Brit. There are a number of other minor grammatical differences. Vocabulary There are a lot of examples of different words being used in British and American English. angry (Brit.) = mad (US) autumn = fall boot (of a car) = trunk chemist’s = drug store cupboard = closet flat = apartment lift = elevator nappy = diaper pavement = sidewalk petrol = gas/gasoline rubbish = trash tap = faucet trousers = pants Spelling US theater, center Brit. theatre, centre

http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/quick-grammar/british-english-and-american-english

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How British English and American English are Different Many Americans who love tea would turn up their noses at the idea of adding milk to it. Brits, on the other hand, are known for lacing their strong tea with milk. With or without milk, tea is tea. It’s served one way in Britain and another way in the United States, but everyone can recognize it for what it is. The language that Americans and Brits share is a bit like that—spoken differently in the two locations, but understandable by both groups of speakers.

British and American terms British and American English often spell the same word differently, for example: labour/labor, enthrall/enthral, or centre/center. You can find out more about these differences here. There are also many cases in which the two varieties of English use different terms to describe the same thing. Here’s a list of various British words and expressions together with their American equivalents. Back to usage. You may also be interested in Pidgin, patois, slang, dialect, creole — English has more forms than you might expect There are probably as many terms for different kinds of English vernacular as there are vernaculars themselves: pidgin, patois, slang, creole dialect and so on. But while we usually think of the vernaculars as oral versions of the English language, they're making their way into the written word as well. “There's a really interesting paradox going on, where you're taking something that's constantly changing — and that people don't expect to see written down — and you're making it codified and setting it down for a wider audience," says Dohra Ahmad, editor of an anthology of vernacular literature called "Rotten English." M. NourbeSe Philip, one of the authors included in the anthology, speaks and writes Trinidadian Creole but points out that the process of getting the language on the page is much the same as writing in Standard English. “You can’t write it exactly as the person speaks it," she says.

100 English Synonyms to Expand Your Vocabulary – Espresso English A synonym is a word with the same or a similar meaning as another word. For example, the words big and large are synonyms. Buy and purchase are also synonyms – although we tend to use “buy” in a more informal context, and “purchase” in a more formal context.

Six Amazing Websites that Make Your Writing Stronger Long writing activities are not very frequently done in class. I tend to think that my students are like me; I need the right kind of atmosphere. Writing requires time, silence and lots of inspiration. Ideally, at this time of the year, I would probably wish to be sitting next to a fireplace with the most perfect instagrammable snow falling outside my window while drinking a nice cup of coffee waiting for inspiration to strike. Unfortunately, there isn’t any snow where I live so I’ll have to make do with a bit of rain and some reddish trees. Note: you won’t find “instagrammable” in the dictionary

Pronunciation Pronunciation Lessons Intonation - Intonation is the rising and falling sounds of the voice when speaking. Intonation (Part 2) - Phrasing - In addition to the intonation of a statement, there is another aspect of speech that indicates meaning -- phrasing. Intonation (Part 3) - Contrast - Once the intonation of new information is established, you'll soon notice that there is a pattern that breaks that flow. When you want to emphasize one thing over another, you reflect this contrast with pitch change. Intonation (Part 4) - In any language, there are areas of overlap, where one category has a great deal in common with a different category. Dialect - English varieties of the British Isles Introduction This guide is written for students who are following GCE Advanced level (AS and A2) syllabuses in English Language. This resource may also be of general interest to language students on university degree courses, trainee teachers and anyone with a general interest in language science.

Homebuilt pickups and trailer hitches: How underage teens skirt the law to drive in Photos by the author. [Editor’s Note: Ronan Glon of Ran When Parked recently took a trip to the Swedish countryside, where he discovered a sneaky (and legal) way some teens there have figured out how to drive before the legal age.] Some of the most interesting cars that Sweden has to offer are hiding in small, rural towns, not in museums. That’s because 15-year-olds are allowed to drive virtually any type of car if it’s been converted into a two-seater pickup, and modified to top out at about 20 MPH.

Four Nations Nick: This is London and behind me are the Houses of Parliament. Parts of these buildings are more than nine hundred years old. This is where the laws of the UK are debated and created. British Accents and Dialects Wikimedia The United Kingdom is perhaps the most dialect-obsessed country in the world. With near-countless regional Englishes shaped by millennia of history, few nations boast as many varieties of language in such a compact geography. (NOTE: This page uses the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). For information about this notation, please visit my page of IPA Resources.)

45 Ways To Avoid Using The Word 'Very' A posthaven user upvoted this post. — habebaakiar 3 years ago — barcahaters 3 years ago Lost Property This EFL lesson is designed around a beautiful short film titled Lost Property by Asa Lucander. Students do a dictation, work out meanings of the verb ‘lose’, speak about lost items, watch a trailer and short film, and write a story. I would ask all teachers who use Film English to consider buying my book Film in Action as the royalties which I receive from sales help to keep the website completely free.

BATTLESHIP: IRREGULAR VERBS Much to learn, you still have. – Joda. Despite the evidence that the number of irregular verbs is declining in the English language, there is no danger they will disappear, and the struggle will continue. There are many attempts to find a shortcut in learning irregular verbs, yet with all the options and “magic tricks” available, learning these verbs requires much memorization, drilling and practice. Today I will show how I use the Battleship game to drill and practise irregular verbs in a fun way.

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