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Writing Exercises and Prompts for Journaling, Prose, Poetry and Memoirs

Writing Exercises and Prompts for Journaling, Prose, Poetry and Memoirs
These Writing Exercises are a collection of prompts originally published in The Journal Newsletter. The prompts include journaling prompts, prose prompts, poetry prompts, free writing prompts, and memoir prompts. Jump to the exercises you would like to see: Prompts Copyright © by Susan Michael and David Michael. Journaling Prompts Journaling Prompt - Imagine yourself in a place you like to be (not necessarily someplace you like to *go*). Journaling Prompt - Pretend that you see yourself walking into a room. Journaling Prompt - Create a list of images that symbolize the following: toughness, cruelty toughness, strength Journaling Prompt - Close your eyes for a minute and imagine you are skydiving. Journaling Prompt - Sit yourself in a favorite spot, or imagine an ideal place and describe it as an expanding bubble or sphere. Journaling Prompt - Hold your hands out in front of you, palms down. Journaling Prompt - By what do you measure your value as a person? Free Writing Prompts Poetry Prompts

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Thirteen Writing Prompts. [Originally published May 4, 2006.] Write a scene showing a man and a woman arguing over the man’s friendship with a former girlfriend. Do not mention the girlfriend, the man, the woman, or the argument. 119 Journal Prompts for Your Journal Jar There are a myriad of benefits to journaling, and everyone should consider keeping a journal. However, one of the obstacles that people face when they want to pick up the practice of journaling is that they don’t know what to write about. In this post you’ll discover 119 journal prompts to help you get started in keeping a journal, or as additional inspiration for dedicated journalers. I recommend that you do the following: Get a beautiful jar–it can be a canning jar, a mason jar, or any other jar you have in the house.Print out the prompts below on slips of paper.Place the slips of paper in the jar.Reach into your jar each day as you prepare to write in your journal and take out one of the prompts.Set your timer anywhere from 10 to 40 minutes, depending on how much time you have available for journaling.Write anything that comes to mind as you read each prompt and elaborate on each point as much as you can. Below you’ll find 119 journal prompts for your journal jar.

Journaling Prompts to enhance your journal writing. — Writing Through Life Writing About Domestic Violence October 6, 2014 Since October is Domestic Awareness Month, I want to help bring awareness to this issue while offering ways to write about how violence affects each of us personally. It’s not a subject we like to think about. And when it happens publicly, as recent viral videos have shown, those of us who have not experienced that […] Political Writing Say you are a young person beginning to write about politics and policy. You probably have some idea of what you believe, but have you thought about how you believe it? That is, have you thought about where you will sit on the continuum that stretches from writers who are engaged to those who are detached? Writers who are at the classic engaged position believe that social change is usually initiated by political parties. To have the most influence, the engaged writer wants to channel his efforts through a party.

The Ultimate Guide to Writing Better Than You Normally Do. [Originally published April 10, 2012.] Writing is a muscle. Smaller than a hamstring and slightly bigger than a bicep, and it needs to be exercised to get stronger. Think of your words as reps, your paragraphs as sets, your pages as daily workouts. Think of your laptop as a machine like the one at the gym where you open and close your inner thighs in front of everyone, exposing both your insecurities and your genitals. Because that is what writing is all about. Creative Writing Prompts Many creative writers use prompts to generate new material. Prompts can be challenges -- for example, write a story using only one syllable words or craft an alphabet story where the first sentence begins with the letter A, the next sentence B, and so on -- or themes provided by journals, or a poem to which an writer can respond. For example, the Sun lists prompts and deadlines every issue. To see responses, check out "Readers Write."

Keeping a Writer's Journal Keeping a Writer's Journal: 21 Ideas to Keep You Writing by Sheila Bender Return to Creative Nonfiction · Print-Friendly Version Keeping a journal is one of the best tools to practice trusting your writing and to make sure you keep writing. You can keep a journal in a cheap or an expensive notebook, on scraps of paper dropped into a box, in computer files or in letter form. Just as long as you write as much and as often as you can without editing yourself and you have access to the words you've written, you are keeping a journal. If you haven't been journaling or doing it as often as you wish, think about where you write and when you are likely to have time to write.

Journal Prompts Get artistically inspired with these journal prompts. We, the people of the arts, feed off each other. A painter is inspired by a song. A musician is inspired by a novel. A photographer is inspired by a sculpture.

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