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Writing Exercises and Prompts for Journaling, Prose, Poetry and Memoirs

Writing Exercises and Prompts for Journaling, Prose, Poetry and Memoirs
These Writing Exercises are a collection of prompts originally published in The Journal Newsletter. The prompts include journaling prompts, prose prompts, poetry prompts, free writing prompts, and memoir prompts. Jump to the exercises you would like to see: Prompts Copyright © by Susan Michael and David Michael. Journaling Prompts Journaling Prompt - Imagine yourself in a place you like to be (not necessarily someplace you like to *go*). Journaling Prompt - Pretend that you see yourself walking into a room. Journaling Prompt - Create a list of images that symbolize the following: toughness, cruelty toughness, strength Journaling Prompt - Close your eyes for a minute and imagine you are skydiving. Journaling Prompt - Sit yourself in a favorite spot, or imagine an ideal place and describe it as an expanding bubble or sphere. Journaling Prompt - Hold your hands out in front of you, palms down. Journaling Prompt - By what do you measure your value as a person? Free Writing Prompts Poetry Prompts

Journal Writing Prompts | CreateWriteNow 1. In your Journal, write the phrase "The Cure is here. The Healing has begun" and then write, write, write away. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. Journal and read it. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. subject tag (for example 'work' or 'friends'). 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50.Tell your Journal what you want to say, then take up with some colored pencils and doodle away! 51. 52. 53. 54. Wise One for positive feedback. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69.Our body is a wonderland but we treat it like a garbage can quite often, don't we? 70. nge venues. 71.View your life from a broader perspective. 72.Take a page from the news. 73.See what the characteristics of your astrological sign are. 74. 75. 76. 79. 80. 81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. I try to apply colors like words that shape poems, like notes that shape music. ~ Patricia Anne McGoldrick 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. 95. 97.

10 Creative Block Breakers That Actually Work Doesn't matter what you call it: writer's block or creative block or simply "Where is my inspiration when I need it?!" All creative individuals find their work coming less easily at some times than others. That's when you need strategies, and plenty of them. There are at least 90 such tips, tools, and techniques in , edited by Alex Cornell, with a foreword by Erik Spiekermann. is a fresh compilation of practical, real world solutions offered by a range of creative individuals, including graphic designers, artists, writers, and photographers. These are people who are employed in jobs where they are required to be creative, regularly (brief bios are in the back of the book). The insights in this perkily designed, light-hearted, and useful little volume are sometimes amusing, often unexpected. to find it more compelling. Place an ink-stained handprint on its blankness so you have something to fix. You can't criticize the results. in your episodes of creative block. , not just one. Blocked?

Writer’s Digest - Tips & Prompts Write a scene that includes a character speaking a different language, speaking in a thick accent, or otherwise speaking in a way that is unintelligibe to the other characters. (Note: You don't necessarily need to know the language the character is speaking—be creative with it!) Describe a character's reaction to something without explaining what it is. See if your fellow prompt responders can guess what it is. Write a story or a scene about one character playing a prank on another. Describe the scene from both characters' points of view. Writing Prompt: Write a story that involves confusion over homonyms (words that have the same spelling but different meanings) or homophones (words that sound the same but are spelled differently). For World Storytelling Day, share the best story you've ever heard or told by word of mouth, or have a fictional character recount their favorite story. You're making your way down a cobbled street when a stocky, red-bearded man beckons you into an alley.

The Ultimate Guide to Writing Better Than You Normally Do. Writing is a muscle. Smaller than a hamstring and slightly bigger than a bicep, and it needs to be exercised to get stronger. Think of your words as reps, your paragraphs as sets, your pages as daily workouts. Think of your laptop as a machine like the one at the gym where you open and close your inner thighs in front of everyone, exposing both your insecurities and your genitals. Because that is what writing is all about. Procrastination is an alluring siren taunting you to google the country where Balki from Perfect Strangers was from, and to arrange sticky notes on your dog in the shape of hilarious dog shorts. The blank white page. Mark Twain once said, “Show, don’t tell.” Finding a really good muse these days isn’t easy, so plan on going through quite a few before landing on a winner. There are two things more difficult than writing. It’s no secret that great writers are great readers, and that if you can’t read, your writing will often suffer.

Exercises for being very creative wisdom within, ink | Reflection + Re(Dis)covery = Self-Confidence… Re-INK Your Life! How to write a scene One of the thing I admire most about Jane Espenson’s blog is that she talks very directly about the words on the page, giving names to techniques I use but never really think about. The two-percenter, for example. So one of my goals for 2007 is to get a little more granular in my advice-giving, and talk less about Screenwriting and more about screenwriting — in particular, scene writing. Spend a few years as a screenwriter, and writing a scene becomes an almost unconscious process. It’s the same with writing a scene. So here’s my attempt to introspect and describe what I’m doing that I’m not even aware I’m doing. Many screenwriting books will tell you to focus on what the characters want. The question is not, “What could happen?” Imagine the projectionist screwed up and accidentally lopped off this scene. But it’s so dramatic! Tough. Scripts are often clogged with characters who have no business being there. Most of your scenes won’t have one of these out-of-nowhere aspects.

Poetic Asides with Robert Lee Brewer Are you passionate about writing poetry? Check out Robert Lee Brewer’s blog, Poetic Asides. You’ll find poetry prompts, solid tips on writing poetry, interviews with poets, and blog posts highlighting poetic forms like chant, haibun or nonet poems, rispetto, and prose poetry. Sit back, relax, and learn more about the craft of poetry! 2014 April PAD Challenge: Day 12 Wow! 2014 April PAD Challenge: Day 11 One of the refrains from the Austin International Poetry Festival was, “Buy the book!” 2014 April PAD Challenge: Day 10 Quick note on selecting poems for the anthology: I plan to pull poems on average 5-7 days after the prompt is first posted. 2014 April PAD Challenge: Day 9 Before we get into today’s prompt, I just want to address a few common questions I’ve been asked recently: Who can join the challenge? 2014 April PAD Challenge: Day 8 Spent yesterday catching up on sleep after attending the super fun Austin International Poetry Festival with Tammy. 2014 April PAD Challenge: Day 7 Wow!

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