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Mythology, folklore, and religion.

Mythology, folklore, and religion.
Please enter the award-winning internet encyclopedia of mythology, folklore, and religion. Here you will find everything from A-gskw to Zveda Vechanyaya, with plenty in between. The mythology section is divided to six geographical regions: Africa, Americas, Asia, Europe, Middle East, and Oceania. Each region has many clearly defined subdivisions that will ease your search. The Folklore section contains general folklore, Arthurian legends, and fascinating folktales from many lands. In addition, we feature special interest areas to enhance and refine your research.

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Writing The Perfect Scene: Advanced Fiction Writing Tips Having trouble making the scenes in your novel work their magic? In this article, I’ll show you how to write the “perfect” scene. Maybe you think it’s impossible to write the perfect scene. After all, who can choose every word perfectly, every thought, every sentence, every paragraph? What does perfection mean, anyway? Honestly, I don’t know.

List of magical terms and traditions List of occult terms From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. Contents: [hide] U-M Fantasy and Science Fiction Website Welcome one and all to the University of Michigan Fantasy and Science Fiction Home Pages. We hope you find this page a valuable resource. These pages are dedicated to assisting scholars of all types all over the world. We are constantly striving to provide an extensive and useful location for all types of information and tools that will help us study fantasy and science fiction. Olaf Stapledon said it best when he wrote: "Did not our life issue daily as more or less firm threads of active living, and mesh itself into the growing web, the intricate, ever-proliferating pattern of mankind?"

Glossary of Literary Terms allegory (AL-eh-GOR-ee): a narrative that serves as an extended metaphor. Allegories are written in the form of fables, parables, poems, stories, and almost any other style or genre. The main purpose of an allegory is to tell a story that has characters, a setting, as well as other types of symbols, that have both literal and figurative meanings. The difference between an allegory and a symbol is that an allegory is a complete narrative that conveys abstract ideas to get a point across, while a symbol is a representation of an idea or concept that can have a different meaning throughout a literary work (A Handbook to Literature).

The Golden Dawn FAQ Version 6.0, December 1999 Created and Maintained by Steven R. Cranmer (scranmer@cfa.harvard.edu) from 1993 through early 1999. Now maintained and updated by Al Billings (memoria@memoria.com). Copyright Steven R. Cranmer, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998 Copyright Steven R. Write Better: 3 Ways To Introduce Your Main CharacterWritersDigest.com One of the biggest bugaboos in manuscript submissions is when the author doesn’t properly introduce the protagonist within the first chapter. Readers want to know quickly the protagonist’s sex, age and level of sophistication in the world of the story, and they want to relate to the character on an emotional level. Readers’ interest in the protagonist has to be earned, in other words. If we like a character, then we want to see her do well and we’re willing to follow her around and invest our time and interest in rooting her on in her struggle. But it’s important we know some essentials about the character so we can get to like her.

Greek Gods Family Tree Doing homework? Your teacher has already seen this. See Theoi; it has properly-sourced information. Known errors: Generally inconsistent sourcing. The Hero's Quest |Arthurian Legend| |Beowulf| |Classical Mythology| |Creation Stories| |Fairy Tales and Folktales| |Homer, The Iliad and The Odyssey| |Mythology Main Page| The all-purpose guide to epic moviesThis chart shows different archetypal roles at work in Harry Potter, Star Wars, and other movies: the hero, the threshold guardian, the trickster, etc. An Anti-Hero of One's OwnThis TED-ED video (4:11) explores the pattern of the anti-hero using references to Fahrenheit 451 and 1984, among others.

College 101: The Four Most Common Types of College Essays and How to Approach Them Essay is not a four-letter word—though you may feel like using a few of your own when it comes time to write one. Most students would rather swim in a vat full of sharks while singing the national anthem (sharks + singing = Shmoop's worst nightmare) than sit down and write an application essay. And hey, we get it. It's easy to shrug off brainstorming, outlining, and agonizing over essay prompts for a Saturday afternoon snooze or four back-to-back episodes of The Walking Dead. But we also know that, sometimes, all you need to get started is a gentle little Shmoop. (Hint: It means to move things forward a bit.

Grimoires Ancient Grimoires Grimoires are Ancient text manuscripts used in High Magick and the Black Arts to conjure Demonic, Celestial, Olympic and Angelic beings. They provide the Magician with the sigils or seals of each Diety and a description of how they will appear in form and what tasks they can do for your bidding. Some of these are purely systems of Magick. Some of these books can be easily found on Ebay or Amazon. But some are very hard to find and are not in print anymore.

Demons A to Z - Weird Encyclopedia A list of demons, devils, and evil gods from around the world. Probably not exhaustive. If you know of any more, keep it to yourself. Abaddon - King of the Demons of Hell. Also known as Apollyon (Greek). The Occult - Occultopedia: The Occult and Unexplained Encyclopedia Welcome to Occultopedia, the premier internet index of the paranormal, occult and inexplicable. In addition to being the foremost online destination for information about the supernatural, unusual phenomena and the occult, Occultopedia also features a variety of resources for the pagan community, new age buffs, unexplained phenomena enthusiasts, curious minds, and skeptics as well.Occultopedia is the genuine article, the original and the best internet index of the extraordinary and uncanny, shamelessly copied by many, but never equaled. Online since 1995 — at first in a free web space provider, and in 1997 finally with its own domain name and hosting — Occultopedia still is the principal online resource for those looking for the unexplained, the curious and the unusual. Occultopedia is a work in progress, and is not completed. There are so many aspects to the occult and the extraordinary, it would be next to impossible to actually finish such a project.

Analemma In astronomy , an ( / ˌ æ n ə ˈ l ɛ m ə / ; from Greek ἀνάλημμα "pedestal of a sundial ") is a curve representing the changing angular offset of a celestial body (usually the Sun ) from its on the celestial sphere as viewed from another celestial body (usually the Earth). The term is used when the observed body appears, as seen from the viewing body, to move in a way that is repeated at regular intervals, such as once a year or once a day. The analemma is then a closed curve, which does not change. Because of the Earth's annual revolution around the Sun in an orbit that is elliptical and tilted relative to the plane of the equator, an observer at a fixed point on the Earth sees the Sun appear to move in an analemma around a mean position, taking a year to do so. The mean position appears to revolve around the Earth once every mean solar day , because of the Earth's rotation.

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