Encyclopedia Mythica: mythology, folklore, and religion.

Encyclopedia Mythica: mythology, folklore, and religion.
Please enter the award-winning internet encyclopedia of mythology, folklore, and religion. Here you will find everything from A-gskw to Zveda Vechanyaya, with plenty in between. The mythology section is divided to six geographical regions: Africa, Americas, Asia, Europe, Middle East, and Oceania. Each region has many clearly defined subdivisions that will ease your search. The Folklore section contains general folklore, Arthurian legends, and fascinating folktales from many lands. In addition, we feature special interest areas to enhance and refine your research.

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Glossary of Literary Terms allegory (AL-eh-GOR-ee): a narrative that serves as an extended metaphor. Allegories are written in the form of fables, parables, poems, stories, and almost any other style or genre. The main purpose of an allegory is to tell a story that has characters, a setting, as well as other types of symbols, that have both literal and figurative meanings. The difference between an allegory and a symbol is that an allegory is a complete narrative that conveys abstract ideas to get a point across, while a symbol is a representation of an idea or concept that can have a different meaning throughout a literary work (A Handbook to Literature).

Fallacies Dr. Michael C. Labossiere, the author of a Macintosh tutorial named Fallacy Tutorial Pro 3.0, has kindly agreed to allow the text of his work to appear on the Nizkor site, as a Nizkor Feature. Stories, Folklore, and Fairy Tales Theme Page Stories, Folklore, and Fairy Tales Theme Page This CLN Theme Page has links to two types of resources related to the study of Stories, Folklore, and Fairy Tales. Students and teachers will find curricular resources (information, content...) to help them learn about this topic. In addition, there are also links to instructional materials (lesson plans) which will help teachers provide instruction in this theme.

Huginn's Heathen Hof Original-Ósnjallr maðrhyggsk munu ey lifaef hann við víg varasken elli gefrhonum engi friðþótt honum geirar gefi Translation-The cowardly manthinks he will live foreverif he just avoids conflictbut old age gives him no peacethough spears have spared him-Hávamál: Stanza 16 Much like the preceding stanza (15), this verse gives us a glimpse into ancient Germanic philosophy. In fifteen, Odin told us that we should be both cheerful and generous until death finds us.

Bespelled In The Archives I grimaced, examining the neat box of pale blue cardboard in front of me. Manuscript number 4171? This wasn’t the one I’d ordered, and I was conscious of my rapidly passing research week. College 101: The Four Most Common Types of College Essays and How to Approach Them Essay is not a four-letter word—though you may feel like using a few of your own when it comes time to write one. Most students would rather swim in a vat full of sharks while singing the national anthem (sharks + singing = Shmoop's worst nightmare) than sit down and write an application essay. And hey, we get it. It's easy to shrug off brainstorming, outlining, and agonizing over essay prompts for a Saturday afternoon snooze or four back-to-back episodes of The Walking Dead. But we also know that, sometimes, all you need to get started is a gentle little Shmoop. (Hint: It means to move things forward a bit.

MLA Formatting and Style Guide Summary: MLA (Modern Language Association) style is most commonly used to write papers and cite sources within the liberal arts and humanities. This resource, updated to reflect the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (7th ed.) and the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (3rd ed.), offers examples for the general format of MLA research papers, in-text citations, endnotes/footnotes, and the Works Cited page. Contributors:Tony Russell, Allen Brizee, Elizabeth Angeli, Russell Keck, Joshua M. Paiz, Michelle Campbell, Rodrigo Rodríguez-Fuentes, Purdue OWL StaffLast Edited: 2014-10-10 09:09:47

Preschool Theme - Alphabet Activities If you need more alphabet activities, you'll find another alphabet theme in the Rainbow Resource Room. "My B Balloon"Help preschool children recognize the letter "B" and words and objects that begin with the letter "B" with this pre-school activity by Lisa B.Materials: Old magazines, picture books, scissors, glue, balloon, marker. Description: Teacher sits with child and look through a magazine, or picture book. Find as many items as you can that begin with the letter "B", and cut them out.

Worldbuilding: Fantasy Religion Design Guide by Joe Wetzel (joewetzel at gmail dot com) [If you like this article, check out the other Worldbuilding articles on this website using the sidebar navigation.] Depending on your campaign setting idea, in the early stages you may only need a bare minimum of details about your religion. In cases like these make sure you flesh out any particular deities you need (for example if a character is a Cleric or Paladin describe that god in at least bullet points and note any needed game statistics or mechanics such as the god’s domains) and build up the religion later when it is needed or when you have an intriguing idea. This also gives you an opportunity to see how the players react to your religion’s skeleton and build on what they like and what is important to your evolving setting and story.

The Key of Hell: An Enlightenment Sorcery Manual Cyprianus was, by all accounts, a shady character. In her book Remedies and Rituals: Folk Medicine in Norway and the New Land, Kathleen Stokker writes that medieval Scandinavians spun tales of a Dane named Cyprianus who was so evil that Satan cast him out of hell: "This act so enraged Cyprianus that he dedicated himself to writing the nine Books of the Black Arts that underlie all subsequent Scandinavian black books.” Bizarrely, another tradition maintained that the true Cyprianus was “a ravishingly beautiful, irrestistibly seductive, prodigiously knowledgeable, pious Mexican nun.” Transitional Words & Phrases Using transitional words and phraseshelps papers read more smoothly, and at the same time allows the reader to flow more smoothly from one point to the next. Transitions enhance logical organization and understandabilityand improve the connections between thoughts. They indicate relations,whether within a sentence, paragraph, or paper. This list illustrates categories of "relationships" between ideas,followed by words and phrases that can make the connections: Addition: also, again, as well as, besides, coupled with, furthermore, in addition, likewise, moreover, similarly When there is a trusting relationship coupled with positive reinforcement, the partners will be able to overcome difficult situations.

Research and Citation If you are having trouble locating a specific resource please visit the search page or the Site Map. Conducting Research These OWL resources will help you conduct research using primary source methods, such as interviews and observations, and secondary source methods, such as books, journals, and the Internet. This area also includes materials on evaluating research sources. Using Research These OWL resources will help you use the research you have conducted in your documents. New Zealand Maori Legend - How the Kiwi Lost his Wings Tanehokahoka turned to Pipiwharauroa. "Pipiwharauroa, will you come down from the forest roof?" Pipiwharauroa looked up at the trees and saw the sun filtering through the leaves. Pipiwharauroa looked around and saw his family. "Kao, Tanehokahoka, for I am busy at the moment building my nest." All was quiet, and not a bird spoke.

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