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 Glossary of Poetic Terms

 Glossary of Poetic Terms
Allegory A symbolic narrative in which the surface details imply a secondary meaning. Allegory often takes the form of a story in which the characters represent moral qualities. The most famous example in English is John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, in which the name of the central character, Pilgrim, epitomizes the book's allegorical nature. Kay Boyle's story "Astronomer's Wife" and Christina Rossetti's poem "Up-Hill" both contain allegorical elements. Alliteration The repetition of consonant sounds, especially at the beginning of words. Anapest Two unaccented syllables followed by an accented one, as in com-pre-HEND or in-ter-VENE. Antagonist A character or force against which another character struggles. Assonance The repetition of similar vowel sounds in a sentence or a line of poetry or prose, as in "I rose and told him of my woe." Aubade A love lyric in which the speaker complains about the arrival of the dawn, when he must part from his lover. From Burns's "A Red, Red Rose." Related:  Wind of Freedom 2016Fall 2013--Wind of FreedomLanguage Use

figures of speech Like wildflower seeds tossed on fertile ground, the figures of speech, sometimes called the "flowers of rhetoric" (flores rhetoricae), have multiplied into a garden of enormous variety over time. As the right frame of this web resource illustrates, the number of figures of speech can seem quite imposing. And indeed, the number, names, and groupings of figures have been the most variable aspect of rhetoric over its history. Naming the Figures The figures first acquired their names from the Greeks and Romans who catalogued them. Categorizing the Figures Over time these figures have been organized in a variety of different ways in order to make sense of them and to learn their various qualities —much as a scientist might classify the flora of a forest, grouping like species into families. Situating the Figures within Rhetoric As rich and interesting as the figures are, they do not constitute the whole of rhetoric, as some have mistakenly surmised. Figures of Thought / Topics of Invention

Glossary of Rhetorical Terms | Modern and Classical, Languages, Literatures and Cultures A Glossary of Rhetorical Terms with Examples This glossary came to us from our late colleague Ross Scaife, who encountered it during his graduate studies at the University of Texas. Chris Renaud gave it to him, stating that it originated with Ernest Ament of Wayne State University. Ross, in turn, added some additional examples. Socrates: The fact is, as we said at the beginning of our discussion, that the aspiring speaker needs no knowledge of the truth about what is right or good... Phaedrus: That is what those who claim to be professional teachers of rhetoric actually say, Socrates. --Plato, Phaedrus 272 Note: There are a few links below to Perseus. Alliteration: repetition of the same sound beginning several words in sequence. *Let us go forth to lead the land we love. *Viri validis cum viribus luctant. *Veni, vidi, vici. Anacoluthon: lack of grammatical sequence; a change in the grammatical construction within the same sentence. *Senatus haec intellegit, consul videt; hic tamen vivit.

Glossary of Rhetorical Terms | Modern and Classical, Languages, Literatures and Cultures A Glossary of Rhetorical Terms with Examples This glossary came to us from our late colleague Ross Scaife, who encountered it during his graduate studies at the University of Texas. Chris Renaud gave it to him, stating that it originated with Ernest Ament of Wayne State University. Ross, in turn, added some additional examples. Socrates: The fact is, as we said at the beginning of our discussion, that the aspiring speaker needs no knowledge of the truth about what is right or good... Phaedrus: That is what those who claim to be professional teachers of rhetoric actually say, Socrates. --Plato, Phaedrus 272 Note: There are a few links below to Perseus. Alliteration: repetition of the same sound beginning several words in sequence. *Let us go forth to lead the land we love. *Viri validis cum viribus luctant. *Veni, vidi, vici. Anacoluthon: lack of grammatical sequence; a change in the grammatical construction within the same sentence. *Senatus haec intellegit, consul videt; hic tamen vivit.

Young Goodman Brown Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 1804-1864 . Young Goodman Brown Electronic Text Center, University of Virginia Library | Table of Contents for this work | | All on-line databases | Etext Center Homepage | About the electronic version Young Goodman Brown Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 1804-1864 Creation of machine-readable version: Charles Keller Conversion to TEI.2-conformant markup: University of Virginia Library Electronic Text Center. ca. 35 kilobytes This version available from the University of Virginia Library. Publicly-accessible Commercial use prohibited; all usage governed by our Conditions of Use: About the print version Young Goodman Brown The Complete Novels and Selected Tales of Nathaniel Hawthorne Nathaniel Hawthorne Editor Norman Holmes Pearson Modern Library Edition pp 1033-1042. Prepared for the University of Virginia Library Electronic Text Center. English ``Ha!

Favorite Poem Project *Now Accepting Applications for our annual Summer Poetry Institute for Educators, July 14-18, 2014! Revitalizing Poetry in the Classroom One of the Favorite Poem Project's significant goals is to enhance and improve the teaching of poetry in the nation's elementary, middle and high school classrooms. The study of poetry, Robert Pinsky believes, is crucial in the modern world. "Poetry connects us with our deep roots," says Pinsky, "our evolution as an animal that created rhythmic language as a means of transmitting vital information across the generations. Summer Poetry Institutes Call for Applications The poetry institute was a reaffirmation of why I love poetry as well as a reminder of why I became a teacher. The Favorite Poem Project, in cooperation with the Boston University School of Education, is accepting applications for the eleventh annual Poetry Institute for Educators at Boston University, July 14-18, 2014. FPP Materials A Unique Opportunity Tuition Housing Parking Facilities

HYGINUS, FABULAE 200 - 277 Apollo and Mercury are said to have slept the same night with Chione, or, as other poets say, with Philonis, daughter of Daedalion. By Apollo she bore Philammon, and by Mercury, Autolycus. Later on she spoke too haughtily against Diana in the hunt, and so was slain by her arrows. Mercury gave to Autolycus, who he begat by Chione, the gift of being such a skilful thief that he could not be caught, making him able to change whatever he stole into some other form - from white to black, or from black to white, from a hornless animal to a horned one, or from horned one to a hornless. When Apollo had made Coronis, daughter of Phlegyas, pregnant, he put a crow in guard, so that no one should violate her. When Apollo was pursuing the virgin Daphne, daughter of the river Peneus, she begged for protection from Earth, who received her, and changed her into a laurel tree. Nyctimene, daughter of Epopeus, king of the Lesbians, is said to have been a most beautiful girl. Jason, son of Aeson . . .

Genesis — introduction Genesis is the first book of the Pentateuch (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy), the first section of the Jewish and the Christian Scriptures. Its title in English, “Genesis,” comes from the Greek of Gn 2:4, literally, “the book of the generation (genesis) of the heavens and earth.” Its title in the Jewish Scriptures is the opening Hebrew word, Bereshit, “in the beginning.” The book has two major sections—the creation and expansion of the human race (2:4–11:9), and the story of Abraham and his descendants (11:10–50:26). The first section deals with God and the nations, and the second deals with God and a particular nation, Israel. The opening creation account (1:1–2:3) lifts up two themes that play major roles in each section—the divine command to the first couple (standing for the whole race) to produce offspring and to possess land (1:28). The Composition of the Book. Genesis 1–11. How should modern readers interpret the creation-flood story in Gn 2–11? Genesis 11–50.

Keywords Project COMPLETE COLLECTION OF POEMS BY EDGAR ALLAN POE Poe, a great 19th-century American author, was born on Jan 19, 1809, in Boston, Mass. Both his parents died when Poe was two years old, and he was taken into the home of John Allan, a wealthy tobacco exporter of Richmond, Va. Although Poe was never legally adopted, he used his foster father's name as his middle name. After several years in a Richmod academy, Poe was sent to the University of Virginia. After a year, John Allan refused to give him more money, possibly because of Poe's losses at gambling. Poe then had to leave the university. In 1827 he published, in Boston, Tamerlane and Other Poems. Poe then began to write stories for magazines. Poe, however, soon lost his job with the magazine because of his drinking. In 1840, Poe published Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque, a two-volume set of his stories. The long illness of Virginia Poe and her death in 1847 almost wrecked Poe.

Eighth Grade Eighth grade students examine the roles of people, events, and issues in North Carolina history that have contributed to the unique character of the state today. Building on the fourth grade introduction, the time frame for this course emphasizes revolutionary to contemporary times. The organization is primarily chronological and reference is made to the key national phenomena that impacted North Carolina throughout these periods. Although the value and methods of historical study as a way of learning about people are stressed, key concepts of geography, civics, and economics are incorporated throughout the course for a fuller understanding of the significance of the people, events, and issues. Inherent to the study of North Carolina history is a continuing examination of local, state, and national government structures. << Back | Table of Content | Next >>

Genesis, from The holy Bible, King James version Bible, King James. Genesis, from The holy Bible, King James version Electronic Text Center, University of Virginia Library | The entire work (255 KB) | Table of Contents for this work | | All on-line databases | Etext Center Homepage |

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