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Ten Steps to Better Student Engagement

Ten Steps to Better Student Engagement
Tristan de Frondeville As a teacher, my goal was to go home at the end of each day with more energy than I had at the beginning of the day. Seriously. Now, as I travel the country coaching teachers on how to successfully use project learning, my goal remains the same. And I try to teach educators the strategies they need to achieve this goal in their own classrooms. A teacher in one of my workshops said, "When my students and I are in the flow, then I don't feel like I have to work as hard." Project-based classrooms with an active-learning environment make such in-the-flow moments more common. The good news is that the strategies for creating and managing high-quality project-learning environments are productive in any classroom, whether project learning is a central part of the curriculum or not. Create an Emotionally Safe Classroom Students who have been shamed or belittled by the teacher or another student will not effectively engage in challenging tasks. Cultivate Your Engagement Meter

http://www.edutopia.org/project-learning-teaching-strategies

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26 Keys to Student Engagement My Joyful Jubilant Learning, colleague, David Zinger recently started an Employee Engagement alphabet. Engagement is such a hot topic in education, I thought this was a great idea for educators to follow the lead. So, here it goes: 26 Keys to Student Engagement. Authenticity: We hear it all the time, "Why do we need to know this stuff? When will I ever use this?" There is no doubt that successful learning is directly related to its relevance, purpose and authenticity. Homework: Only Review What You Need to Review - Coach G's Teaching Tips A lot of teachers think that if you assign homework, you must review it with students the following day. This makes sense in that it's important for students to correct and learn from their mistakes. But what if they didn't make any mistakes?

Dialogue Defibrillators: Jump-Start Classroom Discussions! During a 12th-grade English discussion years ago, I asked a question that nobody answered. Wanting students to do more heavy academic lifting, I decided to wait until someone spoke before saying another word. A minute crept by. The class fidgeted while I waited. Ninety tense seconds passed. Students' faces registered confusion and frustration at my brinkmanship. Strategy List: 35 Dimensions of Critical Thought S-1 Thinking Independently Principle: Critical thinking is independent thinking, thinking for oneself. Many of our beliefs are acquired at an early age, when we have a strong tendency to form beliefs for irrational reasons (because we want to believe, because we are praised or rewarded for believing). Critical thinkers use critical skills and insights to reveal and reject beliefs that are irrational.

Accommodations and Modifications Accommodations, modifications, and alternative assessments may be necessary for a special needs child to succeed while working on materials for learning. A student who cannot read nor write at grade level may be able to understand and participate in discussions about material that is read aloud and taught at the child's age-appropriate level. A child who cannot recall basic number facts may be able to do grade-appropriate problems using a calculator or working with number facts chart. A student with cerebral palsy may be able to take part in modified physical education with special equipment and carefully chosen exercises.

What <em>Is</em> Student Engagement, Anyway? (EDUCAUSE Quarterly When EDUCAUSE Quarterly asked me to be a columnist on the topic of student engagement, my first question was, “What is student engagement?” This question seems like a good point of departure for exploring the topic in this first of four columns. To answer this question, I started with the word “engagement.” Several dictionaries could not provide a definition that seemed to come close to what I think people mean when they talk about student engagement. Reflecting on One-to-One Programs More and more schools are bringing laptops, netbooks, and other mobile computing devices into the classroom. Here are some thoughts on these initiatives. 1) Common Understanding What does 1:1 mean in your school? Does it mean that each student has a mobile device at his or her fingertips, or does it mean that each student has the possibility of using a device? (Hint: One of these is not truly 1:1.)

Hattie effect size list - 195 Influences Related To Achievement  John Hattie developed a way of ranking various influences in different meta-analyses related to learning and achievement according to their effect sizes. In his ground-breaking study “Visible Learning” he ranked 138 influences that are related to learning outcomes from very positive effects to very negative effects. Hattie found that the average effect size of all the interventions he studied was 0.40. Six Strategies for Differentiated Instruction in Project-Based Learning Project-based learning (PBL) naturally lends itself to differentiated instruction. By design, it is student-centered, student-driven, and gives space for teachers to meet the needs of students in a variety of ways. PBL can allow for effective differentiation in assessment as well as daily management and instruction. PBL experts will tell you this, but I often hear teachers ask for real examples, specifics to help them contextualize what it "looks like" in the classroom. We all need to try out specific ideas and strategies to get our brains working in a different context.

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