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Ten Steps to Better Student Engagement

Ten Steps to Better Student Engagement
Tristan de Frondeville As a teacher, my goal was to go home at the end of each day with more energy than I had at the beginning of the day. Seriously. Now, as I travel the country coaching teachers on how to successfully use project learning, my goal remains the same. And I try to teach educators the strategies they need to achieve this goal in their own classrooms. A teacher in one of my workshops said, "When my students and I are in the flow, then I don't feel like I have to work as hard." Project-based classrooms with an active-learning environment make such in-the-flow moments more common. The good news is that the strategies for creating and managing high-quality project-learning environments are productive in any classroom, whether project learning is a central part of the curriculum or not. Create an Emotionally Safe Classroom Students who have been shamed or belittled by the teacher or another student will not effectively engage in challenging tasks. Cultivate Your Engagement Meter

Strategy List: 35 Dimensions of Critical Thought S-1 Thinking Independently Principle: Critical thinking is independent thinking, thinking for oneself. Many of our beliefs are acquired at an early age, when we have a strong tendency to form beliefs for irrational reasons (because we want to believe, because we are praised or rewarded for believing). Critical thinkers use critical skills and insights to reveal and reject beliefs that are irrational. In forming new beliefs, critical thinkers do not passively accept the beliefs of others; rather, they try to figure things out for themselves, reject unjustified authorities, and recognize the contributions of genuine authorities. If they find that a set of categories or distinctions is more appropriate than that used by another, they will use it. Independent thinkers strive to incorporate all known relevant knowledge and insight into their thought and behavior. S-2 Developing Insight Into Egocentricity or Sociocentricity S-3 Exercising Fairmindedness S-6 Developing Intellectual Courage

Dialogue Defibrillators: Jump-Start Classroom Discussions! During a 12th-grade English discussion years ago, I asked a question that nobody answered. Wanting students to do more heavy academic lifting, I decided to wait until someone spoke before saying another word. A minute crept by. The class fidgeted while I waited. Ninety tense seconds passed. Students' faces registered confusion and frustration at my brinkmanship. 8 Issues and Remedies We've all experienced whole-class discussions where students don't play along. 1. Sometimes students don't respond to a prompt because it's either too complex, ill-structured, or inaudible. To begin, I describe all the things I don't understand: Why do electrons change behaviors when they are observed? Nobody, I say, is expected to know everything. "Would you please. . . . . . state the question in a different way?" If they comprehend the question, but their answer is tentative, I suggest that they say: "Let me answer the part that I know." 2. 3. 4. Talk about and model trustworthiness in class. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Six Strategies for Differentiated Instruction in Project-Based Learning Project-based learning (PBL) naturally lends itself to differentiated instruction. By design, it is student-centered, student-driven, and gives space for teachers to meet the needs of students in a variety of ways. PBL can allow for effective differentiation in assessment as well as daily management and instruction. PBL experts will tell you this, but I often hear teachers ask for real examples, specifics to help them contextualize what it "looks like" in the classroom. We all need to try out specific ideas and strategies to get our brains working in a different context. 1. We all know that heterogeneous grouping works, but sometimes homogenous grouping can be an effective way to differentiate in a project. 2. Reflection is an essential component of PBL. 3. This is probably one of my favorites. 4. Another essential component of PBL is student voice and choice, both in terms of what students produce and how they use their time. 5. 6.

Hattie effect size list - 195 Influences Related To Achievement  John Hattie developed a way of synthesizing various influences in different meta-analyses according to their effect size (Cohen’s d). In his ground-breaking study “Visible Learning” he ranked 138 influences that are related to learning outcomes from very positive effects to very negative effects. Hattie found that the average effect size of all the interventions he studied was 0.40. Originally, Hattie studied six areas that contribute to learning: the student, the home, the school, the curricula, the teacher, and teaching and learning approaches. John Hattie updated his list of 138 effects to 150 effects in Visible Learning for Teachers (2011), and more recently to a list of 195 effects in The Applicability of Visible Learning to Higher Education (2015).

Brainstorming What this handout is about This handout discusses techniques that will help you start writing a paper and continue writing through the challenges of the revising process. Brainstorming can help you choose a topic, develop an approach to a topic, or deepen your understanding of the topic’s potential. Introduction If you consciously take advantage of your natural thinking processes by gathering your brain’s energies into a “storm,” you can transform these energies into written words or diagrams that will lead to lively, vibrant writing. Whether you are starting with too much information or not enough, brainstorming can help you to put a new writing task in motion or revive a project that hasn’t reached completion. When you’ve got nothing: You might need a storm to approach when you feel “blank” about the topic, devoid of inspiration, full of anxiety about the topic, or just too tired to craft an orderly outline. Brainstorming techniques Freewriting Break down the topic into levels Cubing

The Big List of Educational Grants and Resources Grants NEW! Fund for Teachers Grants for Self-Designed Professional Development Deadline: Applications open October 1; close January 31, 2016 Each year, Fund for Teachers offers summer fellowship grants for preK-12 teachers. Farmers Insurance Thank America's Teachers Grants Deadline: September 29, 2016 Did you receive a thank-you note though the Farmers Insurance Thank America's Teacher program? Disney Summer of Service Grants Deadline: September 30, 2016 Disney Friends for Change, through Youth Service America, is offering $500 awards to young people aged 5-18 for service learning projects. Kids In Need Foundation Teacher Grants The Kids in Need Foundation, along with a variety of partner organizations, is offering a range of grants to fund creative projects in the classroom. Roots & Shoots Mini-Grant from the Jane Goodall Institute Deadline: Sept 30; Nov 11; Jan 20; March 31 Karma for Cara Youth Microgrants Deadline: October 1, Jan. 1 and April 1 Toshiba K-5 Teacher Innovation Grants Back to Top

Step by step guide to brainstorming By Jeffrey Baumgartner Preface: Brainstorming Is Not an Effective Creativity Tool Before you read the article below, there is one thing you should know. Brainstorming is not a very good way to generate creative ideas. The article below was first written in 1997. Meanwhile, I leave the original text of the Step by Step Guide to Brainstorming below for archival purposes. The Step by Step Guide to Brainstorming Brainstorming can be an effective way to generate lots of ideas on a specific issue and then determine which idea – or ideas – is the best solution. A brainstorming session requires a facilitator, a brainstorming space and something on which to write ideas, such as a white-board a flip chart or software tool. Brainstorming works best with a varied group of people. There are numerous approaches to brainstorming, but the traditional approach is generally the most effective because it is the most energetic and openly collaborative, allowing participants to build on each others' ideas.

7 Big Hurdles In Education and Ideas For Solving Them An infographic can hardly contain enough space to tackle the big, hairy challenges of American education. But the non-profit, Digital Promise, has tried to identify some of the biggest challenges — and ideas for solutions — identified by the 46 schools in their League of Innovative Schools that are trying new techniques. They address issues like competency-based learning and personalized professional development, as well as students’ ownership of their learning. Click on the image above to see all seven challenges and their solutions. Katrina Schwartz Katrina Schwartz is a journalist based in San Francisco.

Scamper - Creativity tools from MindTools Improving Products and Services This tool can help you develop new products and services. © iStockphoto/aladin66 It can often be difficult to come up with new ideas when you're trying to develop or improve a product or service. This is where creative brainstorming techniques like SCAMPER can help. This tool helps you generate ideas for new products and services by encouraging you to think about how you could improve existing ones. We'll look at SCAMPER in this article. About the Tool SCAMPER is a mnemonic that stands for: Substitute.Combine.Adapt.Modify.Put to another use.Eliminate.Reverse. You use the tool by asking questions about existing products, using each of the seven prompts above. Alex Osborn, credited by many as the originator of brainstorming, originally came up with many of the questions used in the technique. Note: Remember that the word "products" doesn't only refer to physical goods. How to Use the Tool SCAMPER is really easy to use. First, take an existing product or service. Adapt

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