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Amy Butler

Amy Butler

The Keisha Bag Tutorial ***The Keisha Bag Tutorial*** Large Purse, Grocery Tote, Book Bag (It was late when I put this together. Let me know if I've made any mistakes, or if you have questions!) This pattern is a Copyright of Jana Nielson , Lola...again!!! 2008. For this project you will need: *1 yard Main fabric*1 yard Accent Fabric*fusible interfacing of your choice. From Main Fabric Cut:-Outside body-2@ 14"x 15"-Sides-2 @ 5"x 15"-Bag bottom-1@ 5"x 14"-Back pocket- 2@ 10"x 14"-Handles- 2@ 6"x 22"-tabs- 2 @ 2"x 5"-inside pocket-1 @ 6.5"x 10" From Accent fabric cut:-Lining body-2 @ 14"x 15"-Lining Sides- 2@ 5"x 15"-Lining bottom-1 @ 5"x 14"-Handle accent- 2@ 2.5"x 22"-Back pocket accent- 1@ 3"x 14"-Front ties- 2@ 6"x 22" From Fusible interfacing cut:-Purse body- 4 @ 14" x 15"-Purse side- 4 @ 5" x 15"-Purse Bottom- 2 @ 5"x 14" Before you begin sewing:-Cut out all pieces. We'll start with the back pocket. Stitch across top with a 1/2" seam allowance. Press sandwich open. Now set this piece aside. That is it!!

Grosgrain How To Sew A Reversible Tote Bag With Adjustable Strap | craftpassion.com Having a reversible tote bag is like having 2 bags in one, now with the adjustable strap, you can have even more styling with it. Be it full length till your hip and sling across your chest, or shorten it till just below your armpit, inside out or outside in, style it with your mood and base on your outfit. I made this bag with one of my favorite fabrics. It is actually a lightweight upholstery material normally use as curtain or drape. The silver flower printing caught my eyes and I can’t go home without taking a few yards with me. Let’s get to the tutorial and pattern on how to sew this reversible tote bag with adjustable strap after this jump…. Difficulty: Intermediate SkillTime required: 2-4 hoursMaterial: 1. Download the pdf pattern. Fold fabric as indicate in the drawing, place and pin the tote pattern on top of the fabric. With right-side facing each other, align sewing lines, pin , sew side and base of the tote. Make a snip on the seam allowance 1″ below seam (b).

andrea creates Pleated tote (beach bag) tutorial Before we went away, I decided that a new bag for the beach was a must – something big and roomy to hold books, magazines, sunscreen, hats, and all that other good stuff. So I made this big pleated tote, and it worked perfectly. This is a picture of it in action: And here’s a little tutorial in case you want to make one for yourself – doesn’t have to be for the beach either, it could come in handy for schlepping all kinds of things around town. Here’s what you need: two pieces of your main fabric cut in shape A four pieces of the top shape (B) in a contrasting fabric two pieces of a lining fabric in shape C one piece of the long rectangle for the strap in the contrasting fabric two pieces of the top shapes (B) and one of the strap in a medium weight interfacing 1) Along the longest (22″) edge of the main fabric pieces, mark along the top at the following intervals: 3″ – 4″ – 6″ – 7″ – 9″ – 10″ – 12″ – 13″ – 15″ – 16″ – 18″ – 19″ 13) And voila, this is what it should look like.

Tallgrass Prairie Studio Tutorial: Fabric Bucket/Basket | The Stitchin' Chicken It’s been a long week! I meant to post this sooner, but other things kept getting in the way. Better late than never? Anyhow, please read through the entire tutorial before you start. This bucket/basket (I will refer to it as a bucket as we go through) is approximately 8″ wide x 6″ deep x 6″tall. Materials: Approx. 1/2 yd each – fabric for outside and fabric for liner Batting – 1/2 yd in length (please see notes at the end) Matching thread for assembly (you can use a contrasting thread for final top stitching if you choose) graph paper (or your choice of material to draw a pattern out on – see notes at the end) ruler pencil pins walking foot for machine (not required, but it makes it a lot easier to sew with the batting) First I am going to show you how to draw out a pattern. Pattern Drawn Out I start out drawing out what will be the base of the bucket first. Side Ends You need to do the same for the front panels of the bucket: Side Measurement for Front and Back Batting, lining & outside Assembly:

allsorts Hellooooo! Yes, it's long lost little me, finally getting back to my poor neglected blog. And I come bearing gifts, two freebies for you... a pair of sweet printable shabby rosy paper chains, ready to print as many times as you like and festoon your own shabby cottage... And, they just happen to be samplings of two of my new Shabby Roses digital scrapbook paper packs! It all began when I saw some vintage wallpaper designs that reminded me a bit of Cath Kidston. I only planned to make one paper set, but I kept trying out different color combinations and before I knew it there were eight of them! To get your paper chains, leave a comment (make sure you're not signed into typepad) and I will email you the zipped file. I hope you like them... let me know what you think! Cheers, Jenny

Runaround Bag Pattern In this pattern you’ll find:step-by-step instructions with full color photos and professional illustrations for making one Runaround Bagfull size print-at-home pattern piecestwo interior pocket optionsmagnetic snap optionincludes License to Sell!!! By purchasing this pattern, I also give you (the purchaser of this pattern) the rights to sell finished Runaround bags (on a home based scale). Additional information regarding the license to sell is included in the pattern. Materials needed: 3/4 yard exterior3/4 yard interior1/2" double fold bias tape (store bought or handmade)14mm magnetic snap (optional)8” zipper (optional)1 1/2 yards fusible woven interfacingthreadwater soluble pen Approx. This is an 14 page PDF pattern with full size print-at-home pattern pieces and includes detailed step-by-step instructions with professional illustrations and full color photographs.

Pink Penguin Travel Accessories: Plenty of Pockets Tote When you're on the road, doesn't it always seems to be the ordinary, everyday things you are suddenly in desperate need of: gum, nail clippers, your headphones? I get a little panicky, certain I've left behind the most obvious items... as if perhaps I'm on an arctic expedition and won't see civilization for weeks. But the opportunity for replenishment doesn't matter; I want my stuff close at hand. That's the theory behind our handsome travel tote: plenty o' pockets to stash all your stuff. There are four big outside pockets that wrap front and back plus a deep inside compartment (exactly deep enough for a magazine, I might add!) with its own generous interior pocket. We offer a full set of pattern downloads below for the tote body as well as all the pockets. We recommend using a twin needle to do the decorative stitching on this project. The finished size of the tote is approximately 12½" tall x 11½" wide with 2" deep sides and base. Contributors Storage Solutions Related Articles

Coupe Couture Lazy Girl | Blog » Simple Sewing Alterations You Can Make On Any Bag Project Lazies, Tracy Chapman, owner of Sew Thankful, had a great time creating this Miranda Day Bag for herself. Tracy made two versatile alterations to her Miranda that I want to share with you today. Miranda Day Bag pattern from Lazy Girl Designs (LGD123). Alteration: Applique Instead of Piecing After The Fact The first alteration Tracy made was the vertical black strip at the center of the bag in the picture above. Tracy simply appliqued strips of fabric over the vertical seams on the center of the front and back covers of the bag. I love Tracy’s creative addition to make the bag exactly what she wanted. Applique doesn’t always have to mean adding a flower or other design. Benefit: Don’t Unsew, Re-do, or Start Over The beauty of this alteration is that Tracy added these strips after all the piecing and quilting was done. Adding strips on top of the already sewn cover allowed Tracy to customize her project and move forward without losing any of the work she had already done. Enjoy!

Wallet-to-Tote On the Go ~ Tutorial Lorraine from ikat bag is a favorite around here… She has tons of fun tutorials on her blog and she’s joined us before with this wonderful Back to School Pencil Case tutorial. Today Lorraine shares a tutorial for a new summer essential, the On the Go Wallet-to-Tote! Construction includes three main parts: Assembling the Wallet, Assembling the Outer Bag and Making the Lining. The tote zips into a convenient wallet in this unique and handy design. From Lorraine: Hello, Everyone. These little bags have been around for as long as I can remember, and I thought they’d be a useful addition to the arsenal of summer gear I stash in my car and/or purse. I have three little girls, aged 3,4 and 6, and we’ve found that summer always takes us on adventures we hadn’t planned for– detours to farmer’s markets, dancing in the rain or treasure hunting en route to the park. We always appreciate an extra bag or two for our loot (and wet clothes)! Part One: Assemble the Wallet:You will need: Fold it up… Bags

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